How to Trip Rapid Review

Step 1: Select articles relevant to your search (remember the system is only optimised for single intervention studies)

Step 2: press

Step 3: review the result, and maybe amend the or if you know better! If we're unsure of the overall sentiment of the trial we will display the conclusion under the article title. We then require you to tell us what the correct sentiment is.

48 results for

Cyanoacrylate Eye Injury

by
...
Latest & greatest
Alerts

Export results

Use check boxes to select individual results below

SmartSearch available

Trip's SmartSearch engine has discovered connected searches & results. Click to show

1. Cyanoacrylate Eye Injury

Cyanoacrylate Eye Injury Cyanoacrylate Eye Injury Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Cyanoacrylate Eye Injury (...) Cyanoacrylate Eye Injury Aka: Cyanoacrylate Eye Injury , Superglue Eye Injury From Related Chapters II. Cause Cyanoacrylate adhesives (Superglue) to eyes and lids III. Management Lids or eyelashes are glued shut Use K-Y gel on scissors and cut eyelashes Try to mechanically remove loose glue Avoid solvent use Referral to Ophthalmology Images: Related links to external sites (from Bing) These images are a random sampling from a Bing search on the term "Cyanoacrylate Eye Injury." Click on the image (or right

2018 FP Notebook

2. Cyanoacrylate Eye Injury

Cyanoacrylate Eye Injury Cyanoacrylate Eye Injury Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Cyanoacrylate Eye Injury (...) Cyanoacrylate Eye Injury Aka: Cyanoacrylate Eye Injury , Superglue Eye Injury From Related Chapters II. Cause Cyanoacrylate adhesives (Superglue) to eyes and lids III. Management Lids or eyelashes are glued shut Use K-Y gel on scissors and cut eyelashes Try to mechanically remove loose glue Avoid solvent use Referral to Ophthalmology Images: Related links to external sites (from Bing) These images are a random sampling from a Bing search on the term "Cyanoacrylate Eye Injury." Click on the image (or right

2015 FP Notebook

3. Getting Hooked: A Simple Technique for the Treatment of Adhesive Injuries to the Eyelids. (PubMed)

. Residual glue from the eyelashes can be trimmed with blunt-tip scissors. Examination of the eyelids and ocular surface after application of the technique to open the eyelids showed successful release of adhesion sites with no additional injuries to the eye itself.A Jameson muscle hook can be used in emergency departments to safely and successfully relieve eyelid adhesions due to the inadvertent application of cyanoacrylate glue without the use of general anesthesia.Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All (...) Getting Hooked: A Simple Technique for the Treatment of Adhesive Injuries to the Eyelids. Ocular chemical injuries due to accidental exposure or application of cyanoacrylate, commonly known as "superglue," have increased over the past 30 years. However, current treatment options to relieve eyelid adhesions due to cyanoacrylate applications are difficult to successfully execute and can require sedation or general anesthesia. Here we describe a simple technique to release eyelid adhesions due

2016 Journal of Emergency Medicine

4. Experimental ophthalmic surgery employing cyanoacrylate adhesives. (PubMed)

Cornea pathology Corneal Injuries Elasticity Exophthalmos surgery Eye Diseases surgery Eye Injuries pathology surgery Female Humans Male Methods Middle Aged Orbital Neoplasms surgery Rabbits Rhabdomyosarcoma surgery Sclera pathology surgery transplantation Skin Transplantation Tissue Adhesives Transplantation, Autologous Wound Healing 1968 1 1 1968 1 1 0 1 1968 1 1 0 0 ppublish 4888960 PMC1310321 Arch Surg. 1966 Sep;93(3):428-32 5911261 Arch Surg. 1966 Sep;93(3):441-6 5911264 Am J Ophthalmol. 1966 (...) Experimental ophthalmic surgery employing cyanoacrylate adhesives. 4888960 1969 06 05 2018 11 13 0065-9533 66 1968 Transactions of the American Ophthalmological Society Trans Am Ophthalmol Soc Experimental ophthalmic surgery employing cyanoacrylate adhesives. 986-1021 Straatsma B R BR eng Journal Article United States Trans Am Ophthalmol Soc 7506106 0065-9533 0 Acrylates 0 Tissue Adhesives IM Academic Dissertations as Topic Acrylates Animals Anterior Chamber Aqueous Humor Child, Preschool

Full Text available with Trip Pro

1968 Transactions of the American Ophthalmological Society

5. Recommendations for good practice in Ultrasound: Oocyte retrieval

to pierce the vagina. - The ovary should be lined up to the most accessible position on the screen. - The transducer should be against the ovary (through the vaginal wall). Carefully insert the needle inside the follicle. - Ideally the needle should be inserted in the middle of the ovary to prevent the ovary from moving and needle to cause injury to adjacent organs. - The echogenic tip of the needle should be identified during all manoeuvres. The needle guide seen on the monitor can facilitate safer (...) open. Correction of blood glucose levels and any other infusions should be performed according to local protocols. - The patient must empty her bladder immediately prior to OPU. An empty bladder improves the image quality during transvaginal examination as it decreases the posterior enhancement (ultrasound artefact), whereas a full bladder can distort the anatomy of the uterus and ovary and may increase the risk of injuries. - Patient positioning during OPU needs to be comfortable for both patient

2019 European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology

6. Management of Brain Arteriovenous Malformations: A Scientific Statement for Healthcare Professionals From the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association

, magnified views, and multiple injections, which, together with CT studies and potential additional exposure from endovascular procedures, may lead to high doses to the head and lens of the eye. For these reasons and the highly specific angioarchitectural information (discussed below) obtained in these studies, DSA may be best performed by the members of the cerebrovascular team contemplating treatment. Angiographic features that have been associated with hemorrhage in retrospective studies comparing

2017 American Heart Association

7. Management of brain arteriovenous malformations

with bAVMs compared with patients presenting with ischemic stroke. In addition to stroke risk, DSA entails radiation exposure with potential long-term consequences. bAVM DSA studies often require high frame rates, magnified views, and multiple injections, which, together with CT studies and potential additional exposure from endovascular procedures, may lead to high doses to the head and lens of the eye. For these reasons and the highly specific angioarchitectural information (discussed below) obtained

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2017 American Academy of Neurology

8. Vascular Graft Infections, Mycotic Aneurysms, and Endovascular Infections: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association

indicates computed tomography; I&D, irrigation and débridement; and MRI, magnetic resonance imaging. It is reasonable to consider ultrasonography as the initial imaging procedure. , , Ultrasonography is used primarily, but not exclusively, in patients with extracavitary VGI. Compared with other imaging modalities, ultrasonography is less expensive, can be done quickly, including at the bedside, and does not expose patients to the potential risk of contrast-associated kidney injury. Pseudoaneurysm (...) devicesGadolinium fibrosing dermopathy in renal disease Indium-labeled WBC scan (In-scan) Sensitivity 67%–73%; specificity 87%No contrast kidney injuryUse when CT, MRI nondiagnostic Results take ≥24 hDecreased sensitivity with recent antimicrobial therapyFalse-positive result in early postoperative periodUse in combination with other imaging PET Sensitivity 78%–96%; specificity 70%–93%No contrast kidney injury Less experience than with other imagingDoes not identify specific anatomic locationExpensiveUse

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2016 American Heart Association

9. Systematic review of needs for medical devices for ageing populations

to noncommunicable diseases. The leading causes of mortality in the Western Pacific Region are represented in Table 1. Communicable, maternal, perinatal, and nutritional conditions accounted for 8% of all-cause mortality, injuries accounted for 8% of all-cause mortality, and noncommunicable diseases accounted for 82% of all-cause mortality. Only causes that account for more than 10% of all mortality are included in Table 1. Table 2 includes the major causes (10% or more) of projected DALYs for 2008 (...) Age > 60 years: total estimated DALYs Age > 60 years vs all ages: estimated DALYs (%) T otal estimated DALYs All causes of DALYs (%) All causes 496 817 257 NA 213 449 156 43 Noncommunicable diseases 376 359 807 76 191 851 690 51 Cardiovascular disease 112 302 635 23 80 421 955 72 Malignant neoplasms 74 241 072 15 40 188 854 54 Communicable diseases 65 774 588 13 9 869 564 15 Cerebrovascular disease 55 121 610 11 41 084 201 75 Injuries 54 682 868 11 11 727 900 21 NA: not applicable.7 1

2015 ASERNIP-S

10. Cenegermin (Oxervate) - neurotrophic keratitis

Eye Institute Visual Functioning Questionnaire 25 NGF Nerve growth factor NK Neurotrophic Keratitis NKCP Non-key process parameter NLT Not less than NMT Not more than OC Other concern OD Optical density Assessment report EMA/351805/2017 Page 6/104 OD600 Optical density at 600 nm p75 p75 (low affinity) neurotrophin receptor PC12 Pheochromocytoma rat cells PD Pharmacodynamics PED Persistent epithelial damage PEG Plyethylene glycol PETG Polytethylene terephthalate Ph. Eur. European Pharmacopoeia PK (...) cranial nerve, from the trigeminal nucleus to the corneal nerve endings, resulting in the development of NK. The most common causes of impaired corneal sensation are herpetic keratitis (herpes simplex and herpes zoster viral infection), intracranial space-occupying lesions, and/or neurosurgical procedures that damage the trigeminal ophthalmic branch. Other ocular causes of impairment of corneal sensitivity include chemical burns, physical injuries, corneal dystrophy, chronic use of topical medications

2017 European Medicines Agency - EPARs

12. A Clinical Study to Compare MAR-CUTIS With Dermabond Advanced

Collaborator: Syneos Health Information provided by (Responsible Party): Grünenthal GmbH Study Details Study Description Go to Brief Summary: This is a randomized, open-label, multicenter, comparator-controlled clinical study to compare MAR-CUTIS with Dermabond Advanced in closure of surgical incisions and lacerations ≤15 cm. Eligible subjects will be randomized 2:1 to MAR-CUTIS or Dermabond Advanced. Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase Wounds and Injuries Lacerations Surgical Incision Device (...) : Dermabond Advanced Dermabond Advanced adhesive is supplied sterile, in a prefilled, single-use applicator. The pen-style applicator consists of a crushable ampoule contained within a plastic applicator. The active ingredient in Dermabond Advanced is 2-Octyl Cyanoacrylate. Device: Dermabond Advanced Dermabond Advanced will be applied in 1 continuous layer onto a dry wound through painting motions, taking care not to apply adhesive between the wound edges. The wound will be held for 60 seconds to allow

2018 Clinical Trials

13. Oral Complications of Chemotherapy and Head/Neck Radiation (PDQ®): Health Professional Version

prominent contributors are direct lethal and sublethal damage to oral tissues, attenuation of immune and other protective systems, and interference with normal healing. Principal causes can be attributed to both direct stomatotoxicity and indirect stomatotoxicity. Direct toxicities are initiated via primary injury to oral tissues. Indirect toxicities are caused by nonoral toxicities that secondarily affect the oral cavity, including the following: Myelosuppression. Loss of tissue-based immune cells (...) , and bone. Loss of bone vitality occurs: Secondary to injury to osteocytes, osteoblasts, and osteoclasts. From a relative hypoxia due to reduction in vascular supply. These changes can lead to soft tissue necrosis and osteonecrosis that result in bone exposure, secondary infection, and severe pain.[ ] Oral Complications of Radiation Therapy Acute complications: - Oral mucositis. - Infection: Fungal. Bacterial. - Salivary gland dysfunction: Sialadenitis. Xerostomia. - Taste dysfunction. Chronic

2016 PDQ - NCI's Comprehensive Cancer Database

14. Needs for medical devices for older people

diseases. In the Western Pacific Region non-communicable diseases accounted for 81 per cent of estimated all-cause mortality in 2008 and 73 per cent of all projected DALYs for 2008. 6,7 Persons over the age of 60 years accounted for 80 per cent of all mortality due to non-communicable disease. The leading causes of mortality in the Western Pacific Region are represented in Table 1. Communicable, maternal, perinatal and nutritional conditions accounted for 10 per cent of all-cause mortality, injuries (...) of or compensation for an injury ? investigation, replacement, modification, or support of the anatomy or of a physiological process ? supporting or sustaining life ? control of conception ? disinfection of medical devices providing information by means of in vitro examination of specimens derived from the human body and which does not achieve its primary intended action by pharmacological, immunological or metabolic means, in or on the human body, but which may be assisted in its intended function by such means

2013 ASERNIP-S

15. CPG on Surgical Patient Safety

four hours in length), or in the case of signi? cant loss of blood (>1500 ml) during surgery. Antibiotic prophylaxis for surgery should be administered endovenously. Weak In addition to endovenous antibiotics, it is recommended that antibiotic- impregnated cement be used in the ? tting of joint prostheses. Strong Intracameral antibiotic prophylaxis is recommended in cataract surgery. Weak Intravitreous antibiotic prophylaxis is recommended at the end of surgery following eye-penetrating wounds (...) (Endophthalmitis Study Group 07) Tear duct surgery Recommended SSI Low quality (Vardy 00) Eye-penetrating wound Recommended Endophthalmitis High quality (Narang 03, Soheilian 07) 4.2.1.1.3. Facial Mandibular fractures Recommended (duration not > 24 hours) SSI High quality (Zallen 75, Abubaker 01, Andreasen 06) Oral bone grafts Recommended There was no direct comparison be- tween antiobiotic and non-antibiotic proiphylaxis High quality (Lindeboom 06) Orthognathic surgery Recommended Duration of prophylaxis

2010 GuiaSalud

16. Oral Complications of Chemotherapy and Head/Neck Radiation

, 2010. Etiopathogenesis Oral complications associated with cancer chemotherapy and radiation result from complex interactions among multiple factors. The most prominent contributors are direct lethal and sublethal damage to oral tissues, attenuation of immune and other protective systems, and interference with normal healing. Principal causes can be attributed to both direct stomatotoxicity and indirect stomatotoxicity. Direct toxicities are initiated via primary injury to oral tissues. Indirect (...) and neck radiation can also induce damage that results in permanent dysfunction of vasculature, connective tissue, salivary glands, muscle, and bone. Loss of bone vitality occurs: Secondary to injury to osteocytes, osteoblasts, and osteoclasts. From a relative hypoxia due to reduction in vascular supply. These changes can lead to soft tissue necrosis and osteonecrosis that result in bone exposure, secondary infection, and severe pain.[ ] Oral Complications of Radiation Therapy Acute complications: Oral

2012 PDQ - NCI's Comprehensive Cancer Database

17. Corneal Melt, Postoperative (Diagnosis)

melting (including post-operative corneal melting), a condition that may lead to corneal perforation (open injury), is often an indication of a systemic disease, such as rheumatoid arthritis or lupus, therefore requiring systemic treatment rather than just topical eye drop application. It is extremely important that patients be treated by an expert physician who specializes and understands the process of eye melt, which can be a presenting sign of a serious systemic disorder that can benefit (...) eye, metabolically deprived from changes in pH and glucose levels of the anterior chamber, may need the normally insignificant limbal vascular routes of nutrition to survive. If these routes are no longer functional because of massive thrombosis, then the integrity of the cornea is threatened, and sterile necrosis leading to melting syndrome may be inevitable. Gottsch and Liu propose that a natural protein triggers an immune assault on the eye that can lead to corneal melt. They discovered

2014 eMedicine.com

18. Materials for Wound Closure (Diagnosis)

is strong enough to withstand daily tensile forces and to enhance wound healing when the wound is most vulnerable. In order to fully appreciate the essentials of a wound closure, it is first important to understand the process of wound healing. Healing occurs in 4 stages—hemostasis, inflammation, proliferation, and remodeling. The hemostasis phase begins immediately after injury. While some authors consider this process part of the inflammatory stage, it should be recognized that in the process (...) of hemostasis, the formation of fibrin and degranulation of platelets sets the stage for the subsequent stages. The inflammation stage begins shortly after injury. In this stage, mobilization of the components of the immune system remove damaged tissue and bacteria from the wound. The proliferative stage is the tissue-formation stage in which reepithelialization, angiogenesis, and fibroblast proliferation and migration predominate. During the final stage, the extracellular matrix, which is composed

2014 eMedicine.com

19. Postpartum Hemorrhage (Treatment)

contraction and subsequent therapeutic maneuvers. Wearing a waterproof gown, elbow-length gloves, and eye protection is prudent during the management of PPH. Sterile technique is used. If the uterus remains atonic, commence bimanual massage. A hand is placed on the fundus, and the second hand is placed anterior to the cervix in the vagina. Prepare the perineum and vagina. The vaginal hand may be covered in povidone-iodine solution (Proviodine) or a lubricant to allow it to enter the vagina with less (...) -butyl cyanoacrylate); embolization was performed with permanent materials alone in the remaining four patients. Regular menstruation returned in the 44 patients who were followed up (for a mean 12.6-month period), and five patients were known to become pregnant. [ ] B-Lynch and Cho sutures Recent case series and case reports advocate the use of transmural uterine compression sutures to rapidly control bleeding. The initial reports described the B-Lynch technique, which involves opening the lower

2014 eMedicine.com

20. Surgical Dressings (Treatment)

to withstand daily tensile forces and to enhance wound healing when the wound is most vulnerable. In order to fully appreciate the essentials of a wound closure, it is first important to understand the process of wound healing. Healing occurs in 4 stages—hemostasis, inflammation, proliferation, and remodeling. The hemostasis phase begins immediately after injury. While some authors consider this process part of the inflammatory stage, it should be recognized that in the process of hemostasis, the formation (...) of fibrin and degranulation of platelets sets the stage for the subsequent stages. The inflammation stage begins shortly after injury. In this stage, mobilization of the components of the immune system remove damaged tissue and bacteria from the wound. The proliferative stage is the tissue-formation stage in which reepithelialization, angiogenesis, and fibroblast proliferation and migration predominate. During the final stage, the extracellular matrix, which is composed of fibronectin, hyaluronic acid

2014 eMedicine.com

To help you find the content you need quickly, you can filter your results via the categories on the right-hand side >>>>