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Cranial Nerve 10

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141. Incidence, outcomes, and effect on quality of life of cranial nerve injury in the Carotid Revascularization Endarterectomy versus Stenting Trial. (PubMed)

Incidence, outcomes, and effect on quality of life of cranial nerve injury in the Carotid Revascularization Endarterectomy versus Stenting Trial. Cranial nerve injury (CNI) is the most common neurologic complication of carotid endarterectomy (CEA) and can cause significant chronic disability. Data from prior randomized trials are limited and provide no health-related quality of life (HRQOL) outcomes specific to CNI. Incidence of CNIs and their outcomes for patients in the Carotid (...) in 53 patients (4.6%). Cranial nerves injured were VII (30.2%), XII (24.5%), and IX/X (41.5%), and 3.8% had Horner syndrome. CNI occurred in 52 of 1040 patients (5.0%) receiving general anesthesia and in one of 111 patients (0.9%) operated on under local anesthesia (P = .05). No other predictive baseline or procedural factors were identified. Deficits resolved in 18 patients (34%) at 1 month and in 42 of 52 patients (80.8%) by 1 year. One patient died before the 1-year follow-up visit. The HRQOL

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2015 Journal of Vascular Surgery

142. Management of acute cranial nerve 3, 4 and 6 palsies: role of neuroimaging. (PubMed)

Management of acute cranial nerve 3, 4 and 6 palsies: role of neuroimaging. This article will discuss the management of isolated, acute cranial nerve 3,4 and 6 palsies with special focus on the role of neuroimaging in older adults based on recently published data.Acute cranial nerve palsies affecting the third, fourth or sixth cranial nerves in isolation or in combination with other neurological signs and symptoms can be due to a variety of causes such as ischemia, inflammation, infection (...) and compression of the ocular motor nerves. Although neuroimaging is generally recommended in all individuals presenting with ocular motor nerve palsies that occur in association with other neurological signs and symptoms, the indications for neuroimaging in older individuals (age > 50 years) who present with acute isolated ocular motor nerve palsies are less clear and controversial. Past and recent studies have attempted to address this question. A recent prospective study found that overall 16.5% of adult

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2015 Current Opinion in Ophthalmology

143. Migraine and Risk of Ocular Motor Cranial Nerve Palsies: A Nationwide Cohort Study. (PubMed)

Migraine and Risk of Ocular Motor Cranial Nerve Palsies: A Nationwide Cohort Study. To determine whether migraine is associated with an increased risk of developing ocular motor cranial nerve palsies (OMCNP).Nationwide retrospective cohort study.Medical records of patients with migraine who were entered in the National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD) between 2005 and 2009 were retrieved from the NHIRD in Taiwan. Two cohorts were selected: patients with migraine (n = 138 907 (...) ) and propensity score-matched controls (n = 138 907).Cohorts were followed until the end of 2010, death, or occurrence of cranial nerve (CN)3, CN4, or CN6 palsies. A Cox proportional hazards regression model was used to calculate the hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs), which were used to compare to the risk of developing CN3, CN4, and CN6 palsy between cohorts.After a mean follow-up period of 3.1 years (range, 1-6 years), the migraine cohort exhibited a greater risk of developing

2015 Ophthalmology

144. Clinical applications for diffusion MRI and tractography of cranial nerves within the posterior fossa: a systematic review

Clinical applications for diffusion MRI and tractography of cranial nerves within the posterior fossa: a systematic review Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external websites. Email salutation (e.g. "Dr Smith" or "Joanne") for correspondence (...) , language, journal. ">Data to be extracted: other as well as a to meta-analysis of pre-clinical studies are available. Example: A meta‐analysis will be performed for all outcome measures reported in 10 or more articles. For subgroup analysis a minimum of 8 studies per subgroup is required. If meta‐analysis is not possible, data will be reported through a descriptive summary. ">Planned approach Example: number of metastases: standardized mean difference; incidence of metastasis: risk ratio. ">Effect

2018 PROSPERO

145. Multimodal navigated skull base tumor resection using image-based vascular and cranial nerve segmentation: A prospective pilot study (PubMed)

Multimodal navigated skull base tumor resection using image-based vascular and cranial nerve segmentation: A prospective pilot study Skull base tumors frequently encase or invade adjacent normal neurovascular structures. For this reason, optimal tumor resection with incomplete knowledge of patient anatomy remains a challenge.To determine the accuracy and utility of image-based preoperative segmentation in skull base tumor resections, we performed a prospective study. Ten patients with skull (...) by manual placement of the navigation probe, and errors of localization were measured.Strong correspondence between image-based segmentation and microscopic view was found at the surface of the tumor and tumor-normal brain interfaces in all cases. The accuracy of the measurements was 0.45 ± 0.21 mm (mean ± standard deviation). This information reassured the surgeon and prevented vascular injury intraoperatively. Preoperative segmentation of the related cranial nerves was possible in 80% of cases

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2015 Surgical neurology international

146. Image findings of cranial nerve pathology on [18F]-2- deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography with computerized tomography (PET/CT): a pictorial essay (PubMed)

Image findings of cranial nerve pathology on [18F]-2- deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography with computerized tomography (PET/CT): a pictorial essay This article aims to increase awareness about the utility of (18)F -FDG-PET/CT in the evaluation of cranial nerve (CN) pathology. We discuss the clinical implication of detecting perineural tumor spread, emphasize the primary and secondary (18)F -FDG-PET/CT findings of CN pathology, and illustrate the individual (18)F -FDG-PET/CT CN

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2015 Cancer Imaging

147. Long-Lasting Cranial Nerve III Palsy as a Presenting Feature of Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy (PubMed)

Long-Lasting Cranial Nerve III Palsy as a Presenting Feature of Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy We describe a patient with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) in which an adduction deficit and ptosis in the left eye presented several years before the polyneuropathy. A 52-year-old man presented with a 14-year history of unremitting diplopia, adduction deficit, and ptosis in the left eye. At the age of 45 a mild bilateral foot drop and impaired sensation (...) nerve palsy. A diagnostic workup for CIDP should therefore be performed in those patients in which an isolated and unremitting cranial nerve palsy cannot be explained by common causes.

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2015 Case reports in medicine

148. Occipital condyle fracture and lower cranial nerve palsy after blunt head trauma – a literature review and case report (PubMed)

Occipital condyle fracture and lower cranial nerve palsy after blunt head trauma – a literature review and case report Lower cranial nerve (IX-XII) palsy is a rare condition with numerous causes, usually non-traumatic. In the literature it has been described only a few times after trauma, mostly accompanied by a fracture of the occipital condyle. Although these types of fractures have rarely been reported one could suspect they have been under-diagnosed. During the past decade they have been (...) seen more frequently, most probably due to increased use of CT- and MRI-scanning. The purpose of this review is to increase the awareness of complications following injuries in the craniocervical region.We based this article on a retrospective review of the medical record of a 24-year old woman admitted to our trauma center after being involved in a car accident and a review of the literature on occipital condyle fractures associated with lower cranial nerve palsy.The multitraumatized patient had

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2015 Journal of trauma management & outcomes

149. Radiation-induced lower cranial nerve palsy in patients with head and neck carcinoma (PubMed)

Radiation-induced lower cranial nerve palsy in patients with head and neck carcinoma Radiation-induced cranial nerve palsy (RICNP) is a severe long-term complication in patients with head and neck cancer following high-dose radiation therapy (RT). We present the case report of a patient with bilateral RICNP of the hypoglossal and vagus cranial nerves (XII/X) following postoperative RT in the era prior to the introduction of intensity-modulated RT (IMRT), and an analysis of our IMRT patient (...) cohort at risk including the case of a XII RICNP. A total of 201 patients whose glosso-pharyngeal (IX), X and XII cranial nerves had been exposed to >65 Gy definitive IMRT in our institution between January, 2002 and December, 2012 with or without systemic therapy, were retrospectively identified. A total of 151 patients out of 201 fulfilling the following criteria were included in the analysis: Locoregionally controlled disease, with a follow-up (FU) of >24 months and >65 Gy exposure of the nerves

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2015 Molecular and clinical oncology

150. Nerve Block for the Treatment of Headaches and Cranial Neuralgias - A Practical Approach. (PubMed)

Nerve Block for the Treatment of Headaches and Cranial Neuralgias - A Practical Approach. Several studies have presented evidence that blocking peripheral nerves is effective for the treatment of some headaches and cranial neuralgias, resulting in reduction of the frequency, intensity, and duration of pain.In this article we describe the role of nerve block in the treatment of headaches and cranial neuralgias, and the experience of a tertiary headache center regarding this issue. We also report (...) the anatomical landmarks, techniques, materials used, contraindications, and side effects of peripheral nerve block, as well as the mechanisms of action of lidocaine and dexamethasone.The nerve block can be used in primary (migraine, cluster headache, and nummular headache) and secondary headaches (cervicogenic headache and headache attributed to craniotomy), as well in cranial neuralgias (trigeminal neuropathies, glossopharyngeal and occipital neuralgias). In some of them this procedure is necessary

2015 Headache

151. An inferior alveolar intraneural cyst: a case example and an anatomical explanation to support the articular theory within cranial nerves. (PubMed)

An inferior alveolar intraneural cyst: a case example and an anatomical explanation to support the articular theory within cranial nerves. The authors describe the case of an intraneural ganglion cyst involving a cranial nerve (V3), which was found to have a joint connection in support of an articular origin within the cranial nerves. An inferior alveolar intraneural cyst was incidentally discovered on a plain radiograph prior to edentulation. It was resected from within the mandibular canal (...) with no joint connection perceived at surgery. Histologically, the cyst was confirmed to be an intraneural ganglion cyst. Reinterpretation of the preoperative CT scan showed the cyst arising from the temporomandibular joint. This case is consistent with the articular (synovial) theory of intraneural ganglion cysts. An anatomical explanation and potential joint connection are provided for this case as well as several other cases of intraneural cysts in the literature, and thus unifying cranial nerve

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2015 Journal of Neurosurgery

152. Cranial Nerve VI Palsy After Dural-Arachnoid Puncture. (PubMed)

Cranial Nerve VI Palsy After Dural-Arachnoid Puncture. In this article, we provide a literature review of cranial nerve (CN) VI injury after dural-arachnoid puncture. CN VI injury is rare and ranges in severity from diplopia to complete lateral rectus palsy with deviated gaze. The proposed mechanism of injury is cerebrospinal fluid leakage causing intracranial hypotension and downward displacement of the brainstem. This results in traction on CN VI leading to stretch and neural demyelination

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2015 Anesthesia and Analgesia

153. Disorders of the lower cranial nerves (PubMed)

Disorders of the lower cranial nerves Lesions of the lower cranial nerves (LCN) are due to numerous causes, which need to be differentiated to optimize management and outcome. This review aims at summarizing and discussing diseases affecting LCN. Review of publications dealing with disorders of the LCN in humans. Affection of multiple LCN is much more frequent than the affection of a single LCN. LCN may be affected solely or together with more proximal cranial nerves, with central nervous

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2015 Journal of neurosciences in rural practice

154. Risk factors for cranial nerve injury after carotid endarterectomy. (PubMed)

Risk factors for cranial nerve injury after carotid endarterectomy. Although numerous studies have described the incidence of postoperative cranial nerve injury (CNI) after carotid endarterectomy (CEA), there have been few attempts to identify risk factors for this complication.The 2012 CEA-targeted American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database was used to determine the incidence of CNI after CEA. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed

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2015 Journal of Vascular Surgery

155. Cranial nerve injuries with supraglottic airway devices: a systematic review of published case reports and series. (PubMed)

Cranial nerve injuries with supraglottic airway devices: a systematic review of published case reports and series. Cranial nerve injuries are unusual complications of supraglottic airway use. Branches of the trigeminal, glossopharyngeal, vagus and the hypoglossal nerve may all be injured. We performed a systematic review of published case reports and case series of cranial nerve injury from the use of supraglottic airway devices. Lingual nerve injury was the most commonly reported (22 patients (...) the diverse presentation of cranial nerve injuries helps to distinguish them from other complications and assists in their management. © 2014 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

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2015 Anaesthesia

156. Incidence, outcomes, and effect on quality of life of cranial nerve injury in the Carotid Revascularization Endarterectomy versus Stenting Trial. (PubMed)

Incidence, outcomes, and effect on quality of life of cranial nerve injury in the Carotid Revascularization Endarterectomy versus Stenting Trial. Cranial nerve injury (CNI) is the most common neurologic complication of carotid endarterectomy (CEA) and can cause significant chronic disability. Data from prior randomized trials are limited and provide no health-related quality of life (HRQOL) outcomes specific to CNI. Incidence of CNIs and their outcomes for patients in the Carotid (...) in 53 patients (4.6%). Cranial nerves injured were VII (30.2%), XII (24.5%), and IX/X (41.5%), and 3.8% had Horner syndrome. CNI occurred in 52 of 1040 patients (5.0%) receiving general anesthesia and in one of 111 patients (0.9%) operated on under local anesthesia (P = .05). No other predictive baseline or procedural factors were identified. Deficits resolved in 18 patients (34%) at 1 month and in 42 of 52 patients (80.8%) by 1 year. One patient died before the 1-year follow-up visit. The HRQOL

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2015 Journal of vascular surgery

157. Extraocular cranial nerve palsies in children. (PubMed)

Extraocular cranial nerve palsies in children. Visual disturbances resulting from acute nerve paralysis of the muscles controlling eye movements can be challenging to evaluate in the pediatric population. Children may not be capable of describing symptoms or providing an adequate history. Therefore, it is important to have an understanding of the anatomical course of the extraocular cranial nerves and clinical manifestations of their dysfunction. We report 2 cases of extraocular cranial nerve

2015 Pediatric Emergency Care

158. Treatment Design and Rationale for a Randomized Trial of Prophylactic Cranial Irradiation With or Without Hippocampal Avoidance for SCLC: PREMER Trial on Behalf of the Oncologic Group for the Study of Lung Cancer/Spanish Radiation Oncology Group-Radiation (PubMed)

Treatment Design and Rationale for a Randomized Trial of Prophylactic Cranial Irradiation With or Without Hippocampal Avoidance for SCLC: PREMER Trial on Behalf of the Oncologic Group for the Study of Lung Cancer/Spanish Radiation Oncology Group-Radiation Prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) is part of the usual treatment in most patients with small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) and response after treatment of the primary tumor. Clinical evidence suggests that radiation dose received (...) %) and a significance level of 5% (α = 5%), with a maximum loss to follow-up of 10%.This study is an important step in introducing a new therapeutic approach to patients with SCLC candidates for PCI.Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

2018 Clinical lung cancer

159. Cranial electrotherapy stimulation affects mood state but not levels of peripheral neurotrophic factors or hypothalamic- pituitary-adrenal axis regulation. (PubMed)

Cranial electrotherapy stimulation affects mood state but not levels of peripheral neurotrophic factors or hypothalamic- pituitary-adrenal axis regulation. Cranial electrotherapy stimulation (CES) is reported to aid in relieving symptoms of depression and anxiety, though the mechanism underlying this effect remains unclear. Therefore, the present study aimed to evaluate changes in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis response and levels of neurotrophic factors, as well as changes (...) in mood state, in patients undergoing CES therapy. Fifty healthy postmenopausal women were randomly assigned to either a Sham CES group (n = 25) or an Active CES group (n = 25). CES treatment was conducted in 20-minute sessions, three times per week for 8 weeks, using a micro current cranial electrotherapy stimulator. Blood samples were collected prior to and following the 8-week treatment period for measurement of cortisol, adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF

2018 Technology and health care : official journal of the European Society for Engineering and Medicine

160. A novel tibial tuberosity advancement technique with cranial implant fixation (TTA CF): a pilot study in sheep (PubMed)

of osteotomy gap.Tibial tuberosity advancement with cranial implant fixation was performed in four sheep. Complete radiographic and clinical follow up was recorded. All four sheep had a complete osteotomy line healing at a mean of 10 weeks postoperative (range 8-12 weeks). None of the animals had osteotomy gap healing grades of poor. Minor complication included the minimally cracked Maquet hole on the postoperative radiographs, without displacement of the tibial crest which occurred in 2 sheep. Major (...) A novel tibial tuberosity advancement technique with cranial implant fixation (TTA CF): a pilot study in sheep Cranial cruciate ligament rupture is the most frequent orthopedic disorder in human and animals. An array of surgical techniques have been described to stabilize the stifle joint in dogs, including intraarticular stabilization, extraarticular stabilization, and tibial osteotomy techniques. Tibial plateau leveling osteotomy and tibial tuberosity advancement with a lot of modifications

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2018 BMC veterinary research

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