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Cranial Nerve 10

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101. Idiopathic recurrent facial palsy: Facial nerve decompression via middle cranial fossa approach. (Abstract)

Idiopathic recurrent facial palsy: Facial nerve decompression via middle cranial fossa approach. To introduce our experience of preventing further episodes of idiopathic recurrent facial palsy by facial nerve decompression via middle cranial fossa approach.Twelve cases (surgery group) who had idiopathic recurrent facial palsy underwent facial nerve decompression via middle cranial fossa approach, and 6 cases (control group) who declined surgery accepted conservative treatment. Further episodes (...) decompression via middle cranial fossa approach was able to prevent further episodes of idiopathic recurrent facial palsy, and surgical decompression seemed to achieve better outcomes of facial nerve than conservative treatment.Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

2016 American Journal of Otolaryngology

102. Comparison of probabilistic and deterministic fiber tracking of cranial nerves. Full Text available with Trip Pro

toward significance in probabilistic tracking (p = 0.06). In the clinical cases, the probabilistic method visualized 7 of 10 attempted CNs accurately, compared with 3 correct depictions with deterministic tracking. CONCLUSIONS High angular resolution DTI scans are preferable for the DTI-based depiction of the cranial nerves. Probabilistic tracking with a gradual PICo threshold increase is more effective for this task than the previously described deterministic tracking with a gradual FA threshold (...) Comparison of probabilistic and deterministic fiber tracking of cranial nerves. OBJECTIVE The depiction of cranial nerves (CNs) using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is of great interest in skull base tumor surgery and DTI used with deterministic tracking methods has been reported previously. However, there are still no good methods usable for the elimination of noise from the resulting depictions. The authors have hypothesized that probabilistic tracking could lead to more accurate results

2016 Journal of Neurosurgery

103. Carotid artery and lower cranial nerve exposure with increasing surgical complexity to the parapharyngeal space. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Carotid artery and lower cranial nerve exposure with increasing surgical complexity to the parapharyngeal space. To investigate the extent of carotid artery exposure attained, including the identification of the external carotid branches and lower cranial nerves in five sequential external approaches to the parapharyngeal space, and to provide an anatomical algorithm.Anatomical study.Six latex-injected adult cadaver heads were dissected in five consecutive approaches: transcervical approach (...) with submandibular gland removal, posterior extension of the transcervical approach, transcervical approach with parotidectomy, parotidectomy with lateral mandibulotomy, and parotidectomy with mandibulectomy. The degree of carotid artery exposure attained, external carotid branches, and lower cranial nerves visualized was documented.The transcervical approach exposed 1.5 cm (Standard Deviation (SD) 0.5) of internal carotid artery (ICA) and 1.25 cm (SD 0.25) of external carotid artery (ECA). The superior thyroid

2016 Laryngoscope

104. Resolution of intractable retching following mobilization of a dolichoectatic vertebral artery: case report of a unique brainstem-cranial nerve compression syndrome. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Resolution of intractable retching following mobilization of a dolichoectatic vertebral artery: case report of a unique brainstem-cranial nerve compression syndrome. The authors present the case of a 53-year-old man who was referred with disabling retching provoked by left arm abduction. At the time of his initial evaluation, a cervical MRI study was available for review and revealed an anatomical variation of the ipsilateral juxtamedullary vertebrobasilar junction. After brain imaging revealed (...) contact of the medulla by a dolichoectatic vertebral artery at the dorsal root entry zone of the glossopharyngeal and vagus nerves, the patient was successfully treated by microvascular decompression of the brainstem and cranial nerves. This case demonstrates how a dolichoectatic vertebral artery-a common anatomical variation that typically has no clinical consequence-should be considered in cases of cranial nerve dysfunction.

2016 Journal of Neurosurgery

105. Perpetuation of errors in illustrations of cranial nerve anatomy. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Perpetuation of errors in illustrations of cranial nerve anatomy. For more than 230 years, anatomical illustrations have faithfully reproduced the German medical student Thomas Soemmerring's cranial nerve (CN) arrangement. Virtually all contemporary atlases show the abducens, facial, and vestibulocochlear nerves (CNs VI-VIII) all emerging from the pontomedullary groove, as originally depicted by Soemmerring in 1778. Direct observation at microsurgery of the cerebellopontine angle reveals

2016 Journal of Neurosurgery

106. Cranial nerve injury is associated with dual antiplatelet therapy use and cervical hematoma after carotid endarterectomy. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Cranial nerve injury is associated with dual antiplatelet therapy use and cervical hematoma after carotid endarterectomy. To determine predictors of cranial nerve injury (CNI) after carotid endarterectomy (CEA).Consecutive CEAs performed over a 5-year period were enrolled in this study. Outcomes analyzed included 30-day major adverse event rate (composite of stroke, death, and myocardial infarction), death, stroke, disabling stroke, myocardial infarction, cervical hematoma and CNI rate (...) ). CNI rate at discharge was 2.3% (n = 29). Two patients (9%) had more than one cranial nerve affected. The marginal mandibular branch of the facial nerve was most frequently involved (n = 16; 52%), followed by the hypoglossal (n = 9; 29%), the vagus (n = 4; 13%), and the spinal accessory nerve (n = 2; 6%). Horner's syndrome, consistent with an injury to the cervical sympathetic chain, occurred in 13 patients (1%) who had a true cranial nerve affected as well. The vast majority (94%) of these CNIs

2016 Journal of Vascular Surgery

107. Sumatriptan improves postoperative quality of recovery and reduces postcraniotomy headache after cranial nerve decompression. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Sumatriptan improves postoperative quality of recovery and reduces postcraniotomy headache after cranial nerve decompression. Microvascular decompression (MVD) is a surgical treatment for cranial nerve disorders via a small craniotomy. The postoperative pain of this procedure can be classified as surgical site somatic pain and postcraniotomy headache similar in nature to a migraine, including its association with photophobia, nausea, and vomiting. This headache can be difficult to treat and can

2016 British Journal of Anaesthesia Controlled trial quality: predicted high

108. Lyme Disease Presenting with Multiple Cranial Nerve Deficits: Report of a Case Full Text available with Trip Pro

Lyme Disease Presenting with Multiple Cranial Nerve Deficits: Report of a Case Lyme disease is a tick-transmitted multisystem inflammatory disease caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi. With more than 25,000 CDC reported cases annually, it has become the most common vector-borne disease in the United States. We report a case of 38-year-old man with Lyme disease presenting with simultaneous palsy of 3rd, 5th, 7th, 9th, and 10th cranial nerves.

2016 Case Reports in Emergency Medicine

109. A pediatric case of pituitary macroadenoma presenting with pituitary apoplexy and cranial nerve involvement: case report Full Text available with Trip Pro

A pediatric case of pituitary macroadenoma presenting with pituitary apoplexy and cranial nerve involvement: case report Pituitary adenomas usually arise from the anterior lobe of the pituitary gland and are manifested with hormonal disorders or mass effect. Mass effect usually occurs in nonfunctional tumors. Pituitary adenomas may be manifested with visual field defects or rarely in the form of total oculomotor palsy. Visual field defect is most frequently in the form of bitemporal hemianopsia (...) and limited outward gaze in the left eye following trauma and who was found to have pituitary macroadenoma causing compression of the optic chiasma and optic nerve on the left side on cranial and pituitary magnetic resonance imaging.

2016 Turkish Archives of Pediatrics/Türk Pediatri Arşivi

110. Low-Dose Gamma Knife Radiosurgery for Vestibular Schwannomas: Tumor Control and Cranial Nerve Function Preservation After 11 Gy Full Text available with Trip Pro

Low-Dose Gamma Knife Radiosurgery for Vestibular Schwannomas: Tumor Control and Cranial Nerve Function Preservation After 11 Gy This study aims to report tumor control rates and cranial nerve function after low dose (11.0 Gy) Gamma knife radiosurgery (GKRS) in patients with vestibular schwannomas.A retrospective chart review was performed on 30 consecutive patients with vestibular schwannomas treated from March 2004 to August 2010 with GKRS at the Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center (...) . Serviceable hearing, defined as Gardner-Robertson score of I-II, was preserved in 50% of patients. On univariate and multivariate analyses, only higher mean and maximum dose to the cochlea significantly decreased the proportion of patients with serviceable hearing.Vestibular schwannomas can be treated with low doses (11.0 Gy) of GKRS with good tumor control and cranial nerve preservation.

2016 Journal of neurological surgery. Part B, Skull base

111. Insertion of intra-oral electrodes for cranial nerve monitoring using a Crowe–Davis retractor Full Text available with Trip Pro

Insertion of intra-oral electrodes for cranial nerve monitoring using a Crowe–Davis retractor Acoustic neuroma resection is an example of a neurosurgical procedure where the brainstem and multiple cranial nerves are at risk for injury. Electrode placement for monitoring of the glossopharyngeal and hypoglossal nerves during acoustic neuroma resection can be challenging. The purpose of this report is to illustrate the use of a device for intra-oral electrode placement for intraoperative (...) monitoring of the glossopharyngeal and hypoglossal nerves. A 60-year-old male presented for acoustic neuroma resection. Under general anesthesia, a Crowe-Davis retractor was used to open the mouth, providing access to the posterior pharynx. For glossopharyngeal monitoring, two bent subdermal needle electrodes were inserted just lateral to the uvula. Two additional electrodes were inserted on the lateral tongue to monitor the hypoglossal nerve. Cranial nerves monitoring was conducted utilizing both free

2016 Journal of clinical monitoring and computing

112. Fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition (FIESTA) MRI to investigate cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) within dural reflections of posterior fossa cranial nerves Full Text available with Trip Pro

Fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition (FIESTA) MRI to investigate cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) within dural reflections of posterior fossa cranial nerves There is no consensus approach to covering skull base meningeal reflections-and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) therein-of the posterior fossa cranial nerves (CNs VII-XII) when planning radiotherapy (RT) for medulloblastoma and ependymoma. We sought to determine whether MRI and specifically fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition

2016 The British journal of radiology

113. Reappearance of Cranial Nerve Dysfunction Symptoms Caused by New Artery Compression More than 20 Years after Initially Successful Microvascular Decompression: Report of Two Cases Full Text available with Trip Pro

Reappearance of Cranial Nerve Dysfunction Symptoms Caused by New Artery Compression More than 20 Years after Initially Successful Microvascular Decompression: Report of Two Cases Reappearance of symptoms of cranial nerve dysfunction is not uncommon after successful microvascular decompression (MVD). The purpose of this study was to report two quite unusual cases of recurrent and newly developed hemifacial spasm (HFS) caused by a new conflicting artery more than 20 years after the first (...) successful surgery. In Case 1, the first MVD was performed for HFS caused by the posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) when the patient was 38 years old. After 26 symptom-free years, HFS recurred on the same side of the face due to compression by the newly developed offending AICA. In Case 2, the patient was first operated on for trigeminal neuralgia by transposition of the AICA at 49 years old, but 20 symptom-free years after the first MVD, a new offending PICA compressed the facial nerve

2016 Neurologia medico-chirurgica

114. Isolated fourth cranial nerve palsy due to pituitary macroadenoma Full Text available with Trip Pro

Isolated fourth cranial nerve palsy due to pituitary macroadenoma 28050074 2018 11 13 0377-1237 72 Suppl 1 2016 Dec Medical journal, Armed Forces India Med J Armed Forces India Isolated fourth cranial nerve palsy due to pituitary macroadenoma. S67-S69 10.1016/j.mjafi.2016.01.008 Muthukrishnan J J Associate Professor, Department of Internal Medicine, Armed Forces Medical College, Pune 411040, India. Bharadwaj Khushboo K Resident, Department of Internal Medicine, Armed Forces Medical College (...) , Pune 411040, India. Singh Yashpal Y Senior Adviser (Medicine), Army Hospital (R&R), New Delhi 110010, India. eng Journal Article 2016 03 29 India Med J Armed Forces India 7602492 0377-1237 Fourth cranial nerve Macroadenoma Superior oblique palsy 2015 06 24 2016 01 21 2017 1 5 6 0 2017 1 5 6 0 2017 1 5 6 1 ppublish 28050074 10.1016/j.mjafi.2016.01.008 S0377-1237(16)00034-4 PMC5192200 Am J Ophthalmol. 1999 Feb;127(2):235-6 10030582 Am J Ophthalmol. 1999 Feb;127(2):236-7 10030583 Ophthalmology. 2013

2016 Medical journal, Armed Forces India

115. Unusual Spread of Renal Cell Carcinoma to the Clivus with Cranial Nerve Deficit Full Text available with Trip Pro

Unusual Spread of Renal Cell Carcinoma to the Clivus with Cranial Nerve Deficit Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has unusual presentation affecting elderly males with a smoking history. The incidence of RCC varies while the incidence of spread of RCC to the clivus is rare. The typicality of RCC presentation includes hematuria, flank pain, and a palpable flank mass; however, RCC can also present with clival metastasis. The unique path of the abducens nerve in the clivus makes it susceptible to damage (...) in metastasis. We report a case of a 54-year-old African American female that was evaluated for back pain, weakness, numbness, and tingling of bilateral lower extremities and subsequently disconjugate gaze and diplopia. Brain MRI confirmed metastasis to the clivus. She was started on radiotherapy and was planned for chemotherapy and transfer to a nursing home. When a patient presents with sudden unusual cranial nerve pathology, the possibility of metastatic RCC should be sought.

2016 Case reports in neurological medicine

116. Isolated Cranial Nerve-III Palsy Secondary to Perimesencephalic Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Full Text available with Trip Pro

Isolated Cranial Nerve-III Palsy Secondary to Perimesencephalic Subarachnoid Hemorrhage We describe isolated cranial nerve-III palsy as a rare clinical finding in a patient with perimesencephalic subarachnoid hemorrhage. In this unusual case, the patient presented with complete cranial nerve-III palsy including ptosis and pupillary involvement. Initial studies revealed subarachnoid hemorrhage in the perimesencephalic, prepontine, and interpeduncular cisterns. Angiographic studies were negative (...) for an intracranial aneurysm. The patient's neurological deficits improved with no residual deficits on follow-up several months after initial presentation. Our case report supports the notion that patients with perimesencephalic subarachnoid hemorrhage have an excellent prognosis. Our report further adds a case of isolated cranial nerve-III palsy as a rare initial presentation of this type of bleeding, adding to the limited body of the literature.

2016 Case reports in neurological medicine

117. Testing cranial nerve VII: It is all in the wording Full Text available with Trip Pro

Testing cranial nerve VII: It is all in the wording During our practice of clinical neurological examination we frequently observed that patients, upon testing of cranial nerve VII, when instructed to "wrinkle their forehead" (to evaluate the innervation of the M. frontalis), seem to falsely "frown" (i.e. innervate the corrugator supercilii). Here, we set out to prospectively evaluate prevalence and characteristics of this phenomenon. Using a semi-structured questionnaire, we show

2016 eNeurologicalSci

118. Increased Operative Time for Benign Cranial Nerve Tumor Resection Correlates with Increased Morbidity Postoperatively Full Text available with Trip Pro

Increased Operative Time for Benign Cranial Nerve Tumor Resection Correlates with Increased Morbidity Postoperatively Operative time, previously identified as a risk factor for postoperative morbidity, is examined in patients undergoing benign cranial nerve tumor resection.This retrospective cohort analysis included patients enrolled in the ACS-NSQIP registry from 2007 through 2013 with a diagnosis of a benign cranial nerve neoplasm.Primary outcomes included postoperative morbidity (...) complication (OR 4.26, 95% CI 2.08-8.72), return to the operating room (OR 2.65, 95% CI 1.23-5.67), and increased length of stay(1.6 days, 95% CI 0.94-2.23 days). Each additional minute of operative time was associated with an increased odds of overall complication (OR 1.004, 95% CI 1.002-1.006) and increased length of stay (0.006 days, 95% CI 0.004-0.008).Increased operative time in patients undergoing surgical resection of a benign cranial nerve neoplasm was associated with an increased rate

2016 Journal of neurological surgery. Part B, Skull base

119. Bilateral Cranial IX and X Nerve Palsies After Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Full Text available with Trip Pro

Bilateral Cranial IX and X Nerve Palsies After Mild Traumatic Brain Injury We report a 57-year-old man with bilateral cranial nerve IX and X palsies who presented with severe dysphagia. After a mild head injury, the patient complained of difficult swallowing. Physical examination revealed normal tongue motion and no uvular deviation. Cervical X-ray findings were negative, but a brain computed tomography revealed a skull fracture involving bilateral jugular foramen. Laryngoscopy indicated

2016 Annals of rehabilitation medicine

120. Isolated neurosarcoidosis presenting with multiple cranial nerve palsies Full Text available with Trip Pro

Isolated neurosarcoidosis presenting with multiple cranial nerve palsies As an extremely rare subtype of sarcoidosis that develops exclusively in the nervous system, isolated neurosarcoidosis is difficult to diagnose. In addition, its exact clinical features are not known.A 61-year-old man presented with right ear hearing loss, diplopia, and fever. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging revealed mass lesions in the right cerebellum and left side body of the lateral ventricle

2016 Surgical neurology international

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