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Cranial Nerve 10

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221. Radiation-induced lower cranial nerve palsy in patients with head and neck carcinoma Full Text available with Trip Pro

Radiation-induced lower cranial nerve palsy in patients with head and neck carcinoma Radiation-induced cranial nerve palsy (RICNP) is a severe long-term complication in patients with head and neck cancer following high-dose radiation therapy (RT). We present the case report of a patient with bilateral RICNP of the hypoglossal and vagus cranial nerves (XII/X) following postoperative RT in the era prior to the introduction of intensity-modulated RT (IMRT), and an analysis of our IMRT patient (...) cohort at risk including the case of a XII RICNP. A total of 201 patients whose glosso-pharyngeal (IX), X and XII cranial nerves had been exposed to >65 Gy definitive IMRT in our institution between January, 2002 and December, 2012 with or without systemic therapy, were retrospectively identified. A total of 151 patients out of 201 fulfilling the following criteria were included in the analysis: Locoregionally controlled disease, with a follow-up (FU) of >24 months and >65 Gy exposure of the nerves

2015 Molecular and clinical oncology

222. Disorders of the lower cranial nerves Full Text available with Trip Pro

Disorders of the lower cranial nerves Lesions of the lower cranial nerves (LCN) are due to numerous causes, which need to be differentiated to optimize management and outcome. This review aims at summarizing and discussing diseases affecting LCN. Review of publications dealing with disorders of the LCN in humans. Affection of multiple LCN is much more frequent than the affection of a single LCN. LCN may be affected solely or together with more proximal cranial nerves, with central nervous

2015 Journal of neurosciences in rural practice

223. Long-Lasting Cranial Nerve III Palsy as a Presenting Feature of Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy Full Text available with Trip Pro

Long-Lasting Cranial Nerve III Palsy as a Presenting Feature of Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy We describe a patient with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) in which an adduction deficit and ptosis in the left eye presented several years before the polyneuropathy. A 52-year-old man presented with a 14-year history of unremitting diplopia, adduction deficit, and ptosis in the left eye. At the age of 45 a mild bilateral foot drop and impaired sensation (...) nerve palsy. A diagnostic workup for CIDP should therefore be performed in those patients in which an isolated and unremitting cranial nerve palsy cannot be explained by common causes.

2015 Case reports in medicine

224. Occipital condyle fracture and lower cranial nerve palsy after blunt head trauma – a literature review and case report Full Text available with Trip Pro

Occipital condyle fracture and lower cranial nerve palsy after blunt head trauma – a literature review and case report Lower cranial nerve (IX-XII) palsy is a rare condition with numerous causes, usually non-traumatic. In the literature it has been described only a few times after trauma, mostly accompanied by a fracture of the occipital condyle. Although these types of fractures have rarely been reported one could suspect they have been under-diagnosed. During the past decade they have been (...) seen more frequently, most probably due to increased use of CT- and MRI-scanning. The purpose of this review is to increase the awareness of complications following injuries in the craniocervical region.We based this article on a retrospective review of the medical record of a 24-year old woman admitted to our trauma center after being involved in a car accident and a review of the literature on occipital condyle fractures associated with lower cranial nerve palsy.The multitraumatized patient had

2015 Journal of trauma management & outcomes

225. Risk factors for cranial nerve injury after carotid endarterectomy. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Risk factors for cranial nerve injury after carotid endarterectomy. Although numerous studies have described the incidence of postoperative cranial nerve injury (CNI) after carotid endarterectomy (CEA), there have been few attempts to identify risk factors for this complication.The 2012 CEA-targeted American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database was used to determine the incidence of CNI after CEA. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed

2015 Journal of Vascular Surgery

226. Incidence, outcomes, and effect on quality of life of cranial nerve injury in the Carotid Revascularization Endarterectomy versus Stenting Trial. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Incidence, outcomes, and effect on quality of life of cranial nerve injury in the Carotid Revascularization Endarterectomy versus Stenting Trial. Cranial nerve injury (CNI) is the most common neurologic complication of carotid endarterectomy (CEA) and can cause significant chronic disability. Data from prior randomized trials are limited and provide no health-related quality of life (HRQOL) outcomes specific to CNI. Incidence of CNIs and their outcomes for patients in the Carotid (...) in 53 patients (4.6%). Cranial nerves injured were VII (30.2%), XII (24.5%), and IX/X (41.5%), and 3.8% had Horner syndrome. CNI occurred in 52 of 1040 patients (5.0%) receiving general anesthesia and in one of 111 patients (0.9%) operated on under local anesthesia (P = .05). No other predictive baseline or procedural factors were identified. Deficits resolved in 18 patients (34%) at 1 month and in 42 of 52 patients (80.8%) by 1 year. One patient died before the 1-year follow-up visit. The HRQOL

2015 Journal of vascular surgery Controlled trial quality: uncertain

227. Extraocular cranial nerve palsies in children. (Abstract)

Extraocular cranial nerve palsies in children. Visual disturbances resulting from acute nerve paralysis of the muscles controlling eye movements can be challenging to evaluate in the pediatric population. Children may not be capable of describing symptoms or providing an adequate history. Therefore, it is important to have an understanding of the anatomical course of the extraocular cranial nerves and clinical manifestations of their dysfunction. We report 2 cases of extraocular cranial nerve

2015 Pediatric Emergency Care

228. Management of acute cranial nerve 3, 4 and 6 palsies: role of neuroimaging. (Abstract)

Management of acute cranial nerve 3, 4 and 6 palsies: role of neuroimaging. This article will discuss the management of isolated, acute cranial nerve 3,4 and 6 palsies with special focus on the role of neuroimaging in older adults based on recently published data.Acute cranial nerve palsies affecting the third, fourth or sixth cranial nerves in isolation or in combination with other neurological signs and symptoms can be due to a variety of causes such as ischemia, inflammation, infection (...) and compression of the ocular motor nerves. Although neuroimaging is generally recommended in all individuals presenting with ocular motor nerve palsies that occur in association with other neurological signs and symptoms, the indications for neuroimaging in older individuals (age > 50 years) who present with acute isolated ocular motor nerve palsies are less clear and controversial. Past and recent studies have attempted to address this question. A recent prospective study found that overall 16.5% of adult

2015 Current Opinion in Ophthalmology

229. Migraine and Risk of Ocular Motor Cranial Nerve Palsies: A Nationwide Cohort Study. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Migraine and Risk of Ocular Motor Cranial Nerve Palsies: A Nationwide Cohort Study. To determine whether migraine is associated with an increased risk of developing ocular motor cranial nerve palsies (OMCNP).Nationwide retrospective cohort study.Medical records of patients with migraine who were entered in the National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD) between 2005 and 2009 were retrieved from the NHIRD in Taiwan. Two cohorts were selected: patients with migraine (n = 138 907 (...) ) and propensity score-matched controls (n = 138 907).Cohorts were followed until the end of 2010, death, or occurrence of cranial nerve (CN)3, CN4, or CN6 palsies. A Cox proportional hazards regression model was used to calculate the hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs), which were used to compare to the risk of developing CN3, CN4, and CN6 palsy between cohorts.After a mean follow-up period of 3.1 years (range, 1-6 years), the migraine cohort exhibited a greater risk of developing

2015 Ophthalmology

230. Cranial Nerve VI Palsy After Dural-Arachnoid Puncture. (Abstract)

Cranial Nerve VI Palsy After Dural-Arachnoid Puncture. In this article, we provide a literature review of cranial nerve (CN) VI injury after dural-arachnoid puncture. CN VI injury is rare and ranges in severity from diplopia to complete lateral rectus palsy with deviated gaze. The proposed mechanism of injury is cerebrospinal fluid leakage causing intracranial hypotension and downward displacement of the brainstem. This results in traction on CN VI leading to stretch and neural demyelination

2015 Anesthesia and Analgesia

231. Nerve Block for the Treatment of Headaches and Cranial Neuralgias - A Practical Approach. (Abstract)

Nerve Block for the Treatment of Headaches and Cranial Neuralgias - A Practical Approach. Several studies have presented evidence that blocking peripheral nerves is effective for the treatment of some headaches and cranial neuralgias, resulting in reduction of the frequency, intensity, and duration of pain.In this article we describe the role of nerve block in the treatment of headaches and cranial neuralgias, and the experience of a tertiary headache center regarding this issue. We also report (...) the anatomical landmarks, techniques, materials used, contraindications, and side effects of peripheral nerve block, as well as the mechanisms of action of lidocaine and dexamethasone.The nerve block can be used in primary (migraine, cluster headache, and nummular headache) and secondary headaches (cervicogenic headache and headache attributed to craniotomy), as well in cranial neuralgias (trigeminal neuropathies, glossopharyngeal and occipital neuralgias). In some of them this procedure is necessary

2015 Headache

232. An inferior alveolar intraneural cyst: a case example and an anatomical explanation to support the articular theory within cranial nerves. Full Text available with Trip Pro

An inferior alveolar intraneural cyst: a case example and an anatomical explanation to support the articular theory within cranial nerves. The authors describe the case of an intraneural ganglion cyst involving a cranial nerve (V3), which was found to have a joint connection in support of an articular origin within the cranial nerves. An inferior alveolar intraneural cyst was incidentally discovered on a plain radiograph prior to edentulation. It was resected from within the mandibular canal (...) with no joint connection perceived at surgery. Histologically, the cyst was confirmed to be an intraneural ganglion cyst. Reinterpretation of the preoperative CT scan showed the cyst arising from the temporomandibular joint. This case is consistent with the articular (synovial) theory of intraneural ganglion cysts. An anatomical explanation and potential joint connection are provided for this case as well as several other cases of intraneural cysts in the literature, and thus unifying cranial nerve

2015 Journal of Neurosurgery

233. Total Transcanal Endoscopic Facial Nerve Decompression for Traumatic Facial Nerve Palsy Full Text available with Trip Pro

Total Transcanal Endoscopic Facial Nerve Decompression for Traumatic Facial Nerve Palsy A few approaches can be used to decompress traumatic facial nerve paralysis including the middle cranial fossa approach or transmastoid approach depending on the site of injury. In some specific situation of treating traumatic facial nerve palsy whose injured site was confined from the geniculate ganglion to the second genu, transcanal endoscopic approach for facial nerve decompression can be used. We (...) performed two cases of total endoscopic transcanal facial nerve decompression in patients with traumatic facial nerve palsy. After a six month follow-up, both patients showed improvement in facial function by 2 grades according to House-Brackmann grade system. In terms of treatment outcomes, total transcanal endoscopic facial nerve decompression for traumatic facial nerve palsy is an alternative for lesions limited to the tympanic segment I, and has an advantages of being minimally invasive

2018 Yonsei medical journal

234. Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor of the C2 Nerve Root: Case Report Full Text available with Trip Pro

Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor of the C2 Nerve Root: Case Report Here we present the case of a 36-year-old man who was found to have a symptomatic malignant neural sheath tumor growing from the C2 nerve root following a period of progressively worsening headaches. The patient was successfully treated with surgical resection resulting in resolution of cranial nerve deficits. Though uncommon, malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor must be considered in the differential diagnosis (...) of tumors involving the cervical nerve roots and carotid space.

2017 Journal of neurological surgery reports

235. Delayed Trochlear Nerve Palsy Following Traumatic Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: Usefulness of High-Resolution Three Dimensional Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Unusual Course of the Nerve Full Text available with Trip Pro

Delayed Trochlear Nerve Palsy Following Traumatic Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: Usefulness of High-Resolution Three Dimensional Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Unusual Course of the Nerve Cranial nerve palsies are relatively common after trauma, but trochlear nerve palsy is relatively uncommon. Although traumatic trochlear nerve palsy is easy to diagnose clinically because of extraocular movement disturbances, radiologic evaluations of this condition are difficult to perform because of the nerve's (...) small size. Here, we report the case of a patient with delayed traumatic trochlear nerve palsy associated with a traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and the related radiological findings, as obtained with high-resolution three-dimensional (3D) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). A 63-year-old woman was brought to the emergency room after a minor head trauma. Neurologic examinations did not reveal any focal neurologic deficits. Brain computed tomography showed a traumatic SAH at the left ambient

2018 Korean Journal of Neurotrauma

236. Ultrasound Greater Occipital Nerve Block at C2 Level Compared to Landmark-based Greater Occipital Nerve Block

around the nerve at the level of the superior nuchal line. Outcome Measures Go to Primary Outcome Measures : Change in Numeric Rating Scale (NRS) Pain Score [ Time Frame: baseline, 4 weeks ] Pain intensity will be assessed using a NRS marked from 0-10 with fixed intervals, with 0=no pain, and 10=worst pain. Secondary Outcome Measures : Change in number of patients with medication overuse [ Time Frame: baseline, 4 weeks ] The subjects will be provided a headache journal to record the number of days (...) Ultrasound Greater Occipital Nerve Block at C2 Level Compared to Landmark-based Greater Occipital Nerve Block Ultrasound Greater Occipital Nerve Block at C2 Level Compared to Landmark-based Greater Occipital Nerve Block - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies

2018 Clinical Trials

237. Atypical Schwannoma: A 10-year experience. Full Text available with Trip Pro

data of the cohort were recorded. Findings on pathology were evaluated. Initial treatment and post-operative course was recorded. Main outcome measures were clinical presentation, including cranial nerve deficits at the time of presentation, complication and recurrence rates.At presentation, a somewhat accelerated course of cranial nerve deficit was noted among patients with atypical schwannoma as compared to benign schwannoma. In the immediate post-operative period, there were no differences noted (...) Atypical Schwannoma: A 10-year experience. The goal of this study was to describe the clinical presentation associated with atypical schwannoma of the cerebellopontine angle, characterize the pathologic findings and describe the long-term outcome.The study design was retrospective case review of patients with the histopathologic diagnosis of atypical and benign schwannoma of the cerebellopontine angle diagnosed at the study institution over a 10-year period.Tertiary referral center.Demographic

2020 American Journal of Otolaryngology

238. A Prospective 10-Year Observational Study of Reduction of Radiation Therapy Clinical Target Volume and Dose in Early-Stage Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma. (Abstract)

IMRT. With a median follow-up of 15.2 years (range, 2.1-18.1 years), only 1 patient had local failure. Ten-year local recurrence-free survival, regional recurrence-free survival, distant metastasis-free survival, and overall survival were 90.3%, 88.3%, 90.3%, and 91.2%, respectively. Among late IMRT-related adverse events, we recorded 2 patients with G1 cranial nerve injury, 3 patients with G3 hearing loss, and 3 patients with G3 subcutaneous fibrosis. No patients had temporal lobe necrosis, brain (...) A Prospective 10-Year Observational Study of Reduction of Radiation Therapy Clinical Target Volume and Dose in Early-Stage Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma. Current guideline recommends a uniform method of delineation of subclinical disease within the primary clinical target volume (CTVp) for all stages of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). We performed a prospective observational study to investigate the outcomes with a reduced CTVp and radiation dose for early-stage NPC.Patients with newly diagnosed

2020 Biology and Physics

239. Modified Candy-Package technique vs Cerclage technique for refixation of the lesser trochanteric fragment in pertrochanteric femoral fractures. A biomechanical comparison of 10 specimens. (Abstract)

Modified Candy-Package technique vs Cerclage technique for refixation of the lesser trochanteric fragment in pertrochanteric femoral fractures. A biomechanical comparison of 10 specimens. Separation of the lesser trochanteric fragment in pertrochanteric 3-part fractures leads to a significant weakening of the medial cortical wall. Because of the attachment of the Iliopsoas muscle to this structure, the lesser trochanteric fragment tends to cranial dislocation along this muscle's action

2020 Injury

240. Surgical outcomes in patients with endoscopic versus transcranial approach for skull base malignancies: a 10-year institutional experience. (Abstract)

Surgical outcomes in patients with endoscopic versus transcranial approach for skull base malignancies: a 10-year institutional experience. Object: The authors performed an extensive comparison between patients treated with open versus an endoscopic approach for skull base malignancy with emphasis on surgical outcomes.Methods: A single-institution retrospective review of 60 patients who underwent surgery for skull base malignancy between 2009 and 2018 was performed. Disease features, surgical (...) %), and 43.3%, 13.3%, and 10.0% for the open resection cohort, respectively. There were no statistical differences in gross total resection, surgical-associated cranial neuropathy, or ability to achieve negative margins between the groups (p > 0.1, all comparisons). Patients who underwent endoscopic resection had shorter surgeries (320.3 ± 158.5 minutes vs. 495.3 ± 187.6 minutes (p = 0.0003), less intraoperative blood loss (282.2 ± 333.6 ml vs. 696.7 ± 500.2 ml (p < 0.0001), and shorter length of stay (3.5

2020 British Journal of Neurosurgery

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