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2,249 results for

Cranial Nerve 6 Palsy

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1. Sixth cranial nerve palsy and ipsilateral trigeminal neuralgia caused by vertebrobasilar dolichoectasia Full Text available with Trip Pro

Sixth cranial nerve palsy and ipsilateral trigeminal neuralgia caused by vertebrobasilar dolichoectasia To report an unusual case of vertebrobasilar dolichoectasia causing both trigeminal neuralgia and ipsilateral sixth cranial nerve palsy.A patient had undergone surgical decompression of trigeminal neuralgia caused by dolichoectatic vertebral and basilar arteries years before presenting with ipsilateral sixth nerve palsy. Brain MRI showed deviant vertebrobasilar arteries that presumably now (...) compressed the sixth cranial nerve. The unaffected left sixth cranial nerve was visible on MRI, but the affected right sixth cranial nerve was not. The central spinal fluid space in Dorello's canal on the affected side was relatively ample, suggesting atrophy of the affected sixth cranial nerve. On follow-up examination one year after presentation, the patient's diplopia was palliated with spectacle prism.This is the tenth reported case of dolichoectasia causing sixth cranial nerve palsy, but only

2018 American journal of ophthalmology case reports

2. Severe localised granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Wegener's granulomatosis) manifesting with extensive cranial nerve palsies and cranial diabetes insipidus: a case report and literature review. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Severe localised granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Wegener's granulomatosis) manifesting with extensive cranial nerve palsies and cranial diabetes insipidus: a case report and literature review. Granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA, formerly Wegener's granulomatosis) is a multisystem vasculitis of small- to medium-sized blood vessels. Cranial involvement can result in cranial nerve palsies and, rarely, pituitary infiltration.We describe the case of a 32 year-old woman with limited but severe (...) GPA manifesting as progressive cranial nerve palsies and pituitary dysfunction. Our patient initially presented with localised ENT involvement, but despite treatment with methotrexate, she deteriorated. Granulomatous inflammatory tissue around the skull base resulted in cavernous sinus syndrome, facial nerve palsy, palsies of cranial nerves IX-XII (Collet-Sicard syndrome), and the rare complication of cranial diabetes insipidus due to pituitary infiltration. The glossopharyngeal, vagus

2018 BMC Neurology

3. Ocular motor cranial nerve palsy and increased risk of stroke in the general population. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Ocular motor cranial nerve palsy and increased risk of stroke in the general population. To determine whether ocular motor cranial nerve (CN) palsy raises the risk of subsequent stroke in the general population.We investigated the association between ocular motor CN palsy and occurrence of stroke using the National Health Insurance Service-National Sample Cohort database from 2002 to 2013. We included individuals aged ≥ 20 years on January 1st, 2004, and excluded those having any paralytic (...) strabismus, disorders in binocular movement, diplopia and any cerebrovascular diseases before entering the cohort. Incident ocular motor CN palsy was identified by diagnostic codes for third, fourth, and sixth nerve palsies. To determine the effect of incident ocular motor CN palsy on the occurrence of subsequent stroke, we used time-varying covariate Cox regression models. Model 1 included only incident third, fourth, and sixth nerve palsies as a time-varying covariate. Model 2 included Model 1

2018 PLoS ONE

4. Ocular cranial nerve palsies secondary to sphenoid sinusitis Full Text available with Trip Pro

Ocular cranial nerve palsies secondary to sphenoid sinusitis The clinical presentation of sphenoid sinusitis can be highly variable. Rarely, sphenoid sinusitis may present with cranial nerve complications due to the proximity of these structures to the sphenoid sinus.A case series from Rabin Medical Center and all cases of cranial nerves palsies secondary to sphenoid sinusitis that have been reported in the literature were reviewed.Seventeen patients were identified. The abducent nerve (...) was the most common cranial nerve affected (76%), followed by the oculomotor nerve (18%). One patient had combined oculomotor, trochlear and abducent palsies. The most common pathology was isolated purulent sphenoid sinusitis in 64% followed by allergic fungal sinusitis (AFS) in 18%, and fungal infection in 18%. 94% had an acute presentation. The majority (85%) received a combined intravenous antibiotics and surgical treatment. The remainder received conservative treatment alone. Complete recovery

2017 World journal of otorhinolaryngology - head and neck surgery

5. Assessment of cranial nerve mononeuropathy

to the cerebral peduncles. In the subarachnoid space the third nerve passes between the superior cerebellar and posterior cerebral arteries. The nerve then enters the lateral wall of the cavernous sinus and divides into a superior and inferior branch as it enters the orbit through the superior orbital fissure. Brazis PW. Isolated palsies of cranial nerves III, IV, and VI. Semin Neurol. 2009;29:14-28. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19214929?tool=bestpractice.com The trochlear nucleus is located (...) the superior orbital fissure to innervate the superior oblique muscle. Brazis PW. Isolated palsies of cranial nerves III, IV, and VI. Semin Neurol. 2009;29:14-28. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19214929?tool=bestpractice.com The abducens nucleus contains motor neurons for the lateral rectus and interneurons travelling through the medial longitudinal fasciculus to the contralateral third nerve nucleus (to allow simultaneous movement of the contralateral medial rectus muscle). The nerve fascicles leave

2018 BMJ Best Practice

6. Macroprolactinoma causing VI, X, XII cranial nerve palsies nearly 30 years after initial treatment Full Text available with Trip Pro

Macroprolactinoma causing VI, X, XII cranial nerve palsies nearly 30 years after initial treatment A 48-year-old man was diagnosed with a large macroprolactinoma in 1982 treated with surgery, adjuvant radiotherapy and bromocriptine. Normal prolactin was achieved in 2005 but in 2009 it started rising. Pituitary MRIs in 2009, 2012, 2014 and 2015 were reported as showing empty pituitary fossa. Prolactin continued to increase (despite increasing bromocriptine dose). Trialling cabergoline had (...) no effect (prolactin 191,380 mU/L). In January 2016, he presented with right facial weakness and CT head was reported as showing no acute intracranial abnormality. In late 2016, he was referred to ENT with hoarse voice; left hypoglossal and recurrent laryngeal nerve palsies were found. At this point, prolactin was 534,176 mU/L. Just before further endocrine review, he had a fall and CT head showed a basal skull mass invading the left petrous temporal bone. Pituitary MRI revealed a large enhancing mass

2018 Endocrinology, diabetes & metabolism case reports

7. Multiple cranial nerve palsies in immunodeficiency subtype of Burkitt lymphoma Full Text available with Trip Pro

Multiple cranial nerve palsies in immunodeficiency subtype of Burkitt lymphoma Burkitt lymphoma is a late complication of HIV, and bilateral cranial nerve palsies are extremely rare in patients with AIDS. A twenty year old Caucasian male with known congenital HIV who had been non-adherent with anti-retroviral therapy presented with multiple cranial nerve palsies and was eventually diagnosed with Burkitt lymphoma. Before chemotherapy, he was started on radiation therapy to the brain, meninges (...) , and base of skull with the intent of improving cranial nerve palsies and preventing further neurological sequelae since the cranial nerve palsies were dense and there was concern that intrathecal chemotherapy would have less penetration than radiation. He eventually died due to overall disease burden. We hereby present what we believe is the first reported case of Burkitt lymphoma presenting with bilateral facial, vestibulocochlear, left abducens, and mandibular nerve palsies. Recognition of different

2018 Journal of community hospital internal medicine perspectives

8. Ruptured posterior cerebral artery aneurysm presenting with a contralateral cranial nerve III palsy: A case report Full Text available with Trip Pro

Ruptured posterior cerebral artery aneurysm presenting with a contralateral cranial nerve III palsy: A case report Posterior cerebral artery aneurysms can frequently present with an ipsilateral cranial nerve III palsy.We report the first case of a posterior cerebral artery aneurysm associated with a contralateral cranial nerve III palsy. A 64-year-old male presented with acute subarachnoid hemorrhage, Hunt and Hess grade 3, and a left-sided fixed and dilated pupil. Computed tomography scan

2018 Surgical neurology international

9. Multiple Cranial Nerve Palsy Concomitant with Leptomeningeal Involvement in Multiple Myeloma: A Case Report and Review of Literature Full Text available with Trip Pro

Multiple Cranial Nerve Palsy Concomitant with Leptomeningeal Involvement in Multiple Myeloma: A Case Report and Review of Literature Neurologic symptoms are quite common in multiple myeloma, but direct invasion of central nervous system is extremely rare. Leptomeningeal multiple myeloma, as a rare neurological manifestation of multiple myeloma, presents with impairment of consciousness, cranial nerve palsies and convulsions. Here, we describe a 52-year- old male patient, known case of multiple

2018 International journal of hematology-oncology and stem cell research

10. Clinical Course and Prognostic Factors of Acquired Third, Fourth, and Sixth Cranial Nerve Palsy in Korean Patients Full Text available with Trip Pro

Clinical Course and Prognostic Factors of Acquired Third, Fourth, and Sixth Cranial Nerve Palsy in Korean Patients This study aimed to evaluate the clinical course and prognostic factors of acquired third, fourth, and sixth cranial nerve (CN) palsy grouped according to etiology.This study involved a retrospective review of the medical records of 153 patients who were diagnosed with acquired paralytic strabismus from January 2004 to July 2015. Outcomes, recovery rates, and time to recovery were (...) investigated according to the affected CN: CN3, CN4, and CN6 palsies. The patients were classified into four groups based on etiology: idiopathic, traumatic, neoplastic, and vascular.The mean age of the patients was 59.8 ± 14.5 years and the mean follow-up period was 10.8 months. Out of the 153 patients, 63 (41.2%) had CN3 palsy, 35 (22.9%) had CN4 palsy, and 55 (35.9%) had CN6 palsy. The most common causes were vascular related (54.9%), followed by idiopathic (28.1%), trauma (8.5%), and neoplasm (5.88

2018 Korean journal of ophthalmology : KJO

11. Multiple Cranial-Nerve Palsies: An Unusual Culprit Full Text available with Trip Pro

Multiple Cranial-Nerve Palsies: An Unusual Culprit 29629534 2018 11 14 1738-6586 14 2 2018 Apr Journal of clinical neurology (Seoul, Korea) J Clin Neurol Multiple Cranial-Nerve Palsies: An Unusual Culprit. 257-258 10.3988/jcn.2018.14.2.257 Shashikala Turlapati Padmavathi TP Department of Neurology, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research (PGIMER), Chandigarh, India. Mehta Sahil S Department of Neurology, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research (PGIMER (...) 1 ppublish 29629534 14.257 10.3988/jcn.2018.14.2.257 PMC5897215 Orphanet J Rare Dis. 2014 Dec 20;9:198 25527201 Muscle Nerve. 2017 Jul;56(1):E3-E4 28093782 Curr Rheumatol Rep. 2016 Jun;18(6):31 27097818 Br J Radiol. 2016;89(1057 ):20150695 26529231 Curr Rheumatol Rep. 2016 Jan;18(1):3 26711694 Case Rep Neurol. 2016 Oct 31;8(3):211-217 27920712

2018 Journal of clinical neurology (Seoul, Korea)

12. Cranial nerve palsies due to incidental durotomy in lumbar Spine surgery: a case report. (Abstract)

Cranial nerve palsies due to incidental durotomy in lumbar Spine surgery: a case report. We present a 65-year old man who underwent a partial laminectomy at L4. During surgery an incidental durotomy (ID) appeared. Postoperatively he developed cranial nerve palsies. Subsequent to surgical closure of the ID, symptoms completely resolved within three months.

2018 British Journal of Neurosurgery

13. CRACKCast E105 – Brain and Cranial Nerve Disorders

= Carbamazapine 100mg PO BID. Other options: Phenytoin Baclofen Valproate sodium Lamotrigine Gabapentin Levetiracetam Disposition: Neurology with +/- Neurosurgery or ENT consult if surgical decompression is required [4] Facial nerve paralysis: List 6 differential diagnoses for facial (CN VII) paralysis Bell’s palsy Ramsey Hunt syndrome (herpes zoster oticus) Lyme disease (neuroborreliosis) Bacterial infections of the middle ear, mastoid, or external auditory canal Guillain-Barré syndrome HIV infection Tumor (...) CRACKCast E105 – Brain and Cranial Nerve Disorders CRACKCast E105 - Brain and Cranial Nerve Disorders - CanadiEM CRACKCast E105 – Brain and Cranial Nerve Disorders In by Chris Lipp August 31, 2017 This episode of CRACKCast covers Rosen’s Chapter 105, Brain and Cranial Nerve Disorders. These can be the weird and wonderful in the ED, but subtle hints can clue us in that further investigation is needed for our patients. Having a high suspicion for these diagnoses can help you make an appropriate

2017 CandiEM

14. ANCA-Negative Granulomatosis with Polyangiitis Presenting with Hypertrophic Cranial Pachymeningitis, Abducens Nerve Palsy, and Stenosis of the Internal Carotid Artery Full Text available with Trip Pro

ANCA-Negative Granulomatosis with Polyangiitis Presenting with Hypertrophic Cranial Pachymeningitis, Abducens Nerve Palsy, and Stenosis of the Internal Carotid Artery We report a rare case of granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA) presenting with hypertrophic cranial pachymeningitis (HCP), abducens nerve palsy, and stenosis of the internal carotid artery (ICA). A 59-year-old Japanese man presented with a year history of nasal obstruction and a 2-month history of slight headache

2017 Case reports in otolaryngology

15. Disseminated Cryptococcosis with Severe Increased Intracranial Pressure Complicated with Cranial Nerve Palsy in a Child. (Abstract)

Disseminated Cryptococcosis with Severe Increased Intracranial Pressure Complicated with Cranial Nerve Palsy in a Child. Cryptococcosis is less common in children than in adults but remains an important cause of pneumonia and meningoencephalitis in both immunocompromised and immunocompetent patients. Intracranial hypertension commonly complicates cryptococcal meningitis and may cause significant visual and neurologic morbidity and mortality. Early and aggressive management of intracranial (...) hypertension in accordance with established guidelines reduces the risk of long-term complications and death. In this case report, we present a 12-year-old girl with cryptococcal meningitis, pneumonitis and dermatitis complicated with cranial nerve palsy and loss of vision. She was successfully treated with serial cerebrospinal fluid drainage, antifungal and interferon gamma therapy.

2017 Pediatric Infectious Dsease Journal

16. Neurological Imaging in Acquired Cranial Nerve Palsy: Ophthalmologists vs. Neurologists. (Abstract)

Neurological Imaging in Acquired Cranial Nerve Palsy: Ophthalmologists vs. Neurologists. Cranial nerve palsies often require neurological imaging by MRI. Guidelines on whether or not to utilize MRI have been absent or lack clarity. In daily practice, both neurologists and ophthalmologists treat patients with cranial nerve palsy and determine whether neuro-imaging is required. There appear to be differences in policy with respect to neuro-imaging. The question, which will be answered (...) in this study, is the following: to what extent do differences in policy exist between ophthalmologists and neurologists regarding imaging by MRI of patients with acquired ocular cranial nerve palsy?PubMed database was searched for literature on acquired cranial nerve palsy and MRI scanning performed by ophthalmologists and neurologists. Case series published between 2000 and 2015 were included. The first author screened the literature on eligibility, profession of the authors, and conducted data

2017 Strabismus

17. Stroke risk among adult patients with third, fourth or sixth cranial nerve palsy: a Nationwide Cohort Study. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Stroke risk among adult patients with third, fourth or sixth cranial nerve palsy: a Nationwide Cohort Study. This study sought to determine whether isolated third, fourth and sixth cranial nerve palsies (NPs) are associated with increased short- and long-term risk of a subsequent stroke.This was a nationwide retrospective propensity score-matched cohort study. A cohort of patients with NP (n = 466) and a randomly selected, propensity-matched control cohort (n = 2281) were extracted from (...) ; the increased risk was both time- and cranial nerve-dependent.© 2017 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

2017 Acta ophthalmologica

18. A case of idiopathic hypertrophic pachymeningitis presenting with chronic headache and multiple cranial nerve palsies: A case report. Full Text available with Trip Pro

A case of idiopathic hypertrophic pachymeningitis presenting with chronic headache and multiple cranial nerve palsies: A case report. Idiopathic hypertrophic pachymeningitis (IHP) is a rare condition, characterized by a chronic fibrosing inflammatory process usually involving either the intracranial or spinal dura mater, but rarely both. Here, we report a rare case of IHP affecting both the intracranial and spinal dura mater. We also discussed the diagnosis, management, and outcome of IHP.We (...) reviewed the case of a 60-year-old woman presenting with chronic headache, multiple cranial nerve palsies and gait disturbance. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of her head revealed thickened and contrast-enhanced dura in the craniocervical region as well as obstructive hydrocephalus and cerebellar tonsillar herniation. The patient had a suboccipital craniectomy and posterior decompression through C1 plus a total laminectomy. The dura was partially resected to the extent of the bony decompression

2017 Medicine

19. Third Cranial Nerve Palsy after a Chikungunya Virus Infection. (Abstract)

Third Cranial Nerve Palsy after a Chikungunya Virus Infection. Chikungunya fever is a disease caused by a virus from the same family as dengue and Zika. It is endemic in several parts of the world and has recently spread to Latin America. We report the case of a patient, aged 58 years, from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, who in 2013 developed an acute bilateral third cranial nerve palsy sparing the pupil. After extensive investigation, it was diagnosed as caused by chikungunya infection. The patient

2017 Strabismus

20. Incidence and Etiology of Presumed Fourth Cranial Nerve Palsy: A Population-based Study. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Incidence and Etiology of Presumed Fourth Cranial Nerve Palsy: A Population-based Study. To determine the incidence of isolated, presumed fourth nerve palsy in a defined population, and to report the frequency of each cause.Retrospective, population-based case series.A population-based database was used to identify all cases of isolated fourth nerve palsy in Olmsted County, Minnesota, USA diagnosed over a 15-year period (January 1, 1978 to December 31, 1992). The most likely etiology (...) was determined by review of the entire medical record by 2 ophthalmologists. A priori definitions were applied for assigning cause. The incidence of fourth nerve palsy and the frequency of each etiology were calculated. Decade of life at presentation was recorded.Seventy-three patients (74 episodes, 70 [95%] unilateral) were identified. Mean age at presentation was 41.8 (range 3.3-81.6) years. The age- and sex-adjusted annual incidence rate was 5.73 per 100 000 per year (95% confidence interval [CI] 4.31

2017 American Journal of Ophthalmology

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