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Coronoid Process Fracture

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161. Mandibular Fractures

fractured sites are the body of the mandible, condyle, angle, symphysis, ramus and the coronoid process. The cause of the injury may be road traffic accidents, assault, falls, industrial injuries or sports injuries but the relative number of each varies considerably between countries and areas. Under the age of 25, dental trauma accounts for more lost teeth than caries or gum disease. [ ] In terms of violence, young males are most at risk with alcohol an aggravating factor. Women and children are much (...) Mandibular Fractures Mandibular Fractures. Common Mandibular Fractures | Patient TOPICS Try our Symptom Checker TREATMENT RESOURCES Try our Symptom Checker PROFESSIONAL Upgrade to Patient Pro / / Search Mandibular Fractures and Dislocations Authored by , Reviewed by | Last edited 10 Jun 2016 | Certified by This article is for Medical Professionals Professional Reference articles are designed for health professionals to use. They are written by UK doctors and based on research evidence, UK

2008 Mentor

162. Elbow Injuries and Fractures

), and . The mechanism of injury There are a variety of possible injuries because of the presence of three bones and the range of mechanisms of injury. Mechanism of injury in elbow fractures and dislocation Radial head and neck fractures Fall on to an outstretched hand Olecranon fractures Elderly - indirect trauma by pull of triceps and brachioradialis Children - direct blow to elbow Fractures of the coronoid process Fall on to an extended elbow as for elbow dislocation Fractures of the distal humerus Fall (...) stable, gentle supination and pronation exercises are appropriate, using a sling or removable posterior splint for comfort. Flexion and extension exercises after two weeks. Fractures of the coronoid process Mechanism of injury The mechanism of injury is as for elbow dislocation and such fractures are associated with elbow dislocation in about 40% of cases Clinical features Patients present with tenderness over the antecubital fossa and swelling about the elbow. Check strength of the radial pulse

2008 Mentor

163. Zygomatic Arch and Orbital Fractures

for the masseter muscle and protects the temporalis muscle and the coronoid process. Fractures The most common orbital injury is a 'blowout' fracture, usually involving the orbital floor ± the medial wall. The malar complex is also commonly fractured in isolation by a blow to that area. The bones are either fractured or dislocated. The strong central part of the bone usually remains intact and the force is transmitted to the three buttresses, individually or simultaneously (a 'tripod' fracture) resulting (...) views are facial, occipitomental and submento-vertical. Interpretation may be difficult - systematically check for: [ ] The orbital outline - the droplet sign shows soft tissue prolapsing into the maxillary sinus in an orbital floor fracture. The sinus outline - any opacification or fluid level in the maxillary sinus is suggestive of a fracture. An 'elephant's trunk' - follow the zygomatic line laterally and the maxillary line medially. The coronoid processes which should be equidistant from

2008 Mentor

164. The anteromedial facet of the coronoid process of the ulna. (Abstract)

The anteromedial facet of the coronoid process of the ulna. Fracture of the anteromedial facet of the coronoid process has been recognized as an important type of coronoid fracture. We performed a quantitative analysis of 21 3-dimensional computed tomography scans to evaluate the degree to which the anteromedial facet protrudes as a distinct process separate from the proximal ulnar metaphysis. The distance between the center axis of the trochlear notch and the most medial edge (...) of the anteromedial facet averaged 12.5 mm (range, 8.7-20.1 mm). The part of the maximum anteromedial facet width that was supported by the proximal ulnar metaphysis and diaphysis averaged 5.4 mm (range, 1.7-11.5 mm). On average, 58% of the anteromedial facet (range, 26%-82%) was unsupported by the proximal ulnar metaphysis and diaphysis. It is not surprising that this relatively vulnerable protrusion from the anteromedial facet of the coronoid is frequently a separate fracture fragment in complex traumatic elbow

2007 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery

165. Anatomy of the coronoid process. (Abstract)

Anatomy of the coronoid process. Coronoid injuries are classified according to the size of the coronoid fracture. The purpose of this study was to provide a detailed anatomic description of the coronoid process, with specific focus on the coronoid height, the coronoid width, and the olecranon-coronoid angle.Thirty-five cadaveric arms were dissected. All soft tissue was removed and the ulna was disarticulated from the humerus, radius, and the carpal bones. A 3-dimensional digitizing system (...) and the distal insertion of the brachialis muscle, measured 15 mm and was 43% of the ulnar height. The olecranon-coronoid angle ranged between 33 degrees and 38 degrees .For lateral radiographic classification of coronoid fractures, coronoid height is best defined by the trough of the trochlear notch and the slope change of the distal coronoid process. For anatomic studies, coronoid height is best defined by the transverse groove of the sigmoid notch at the guiding ridge and the distal insertion

2006 Journal of Hand Surgery - American

166. Ulnar coronoid process anatomy: possible implications for elbow instability. (Abstract)

Ulnar coronoid process anatomy: possible implications for elbow instability. Ulnar coronoid process fractures are relatively uncommon injuries usually occurring with elbow dislocations and contributing to elbow instability. Recent evidence suggests coronoid tip fractures have a role in the instability. We sought to quantify the capsular and brachialis attachments of the ulnar coronoid process to better understand why instability occurs. We prepared eight fresh-frozen cadaveric specimens (...) to ascertain the specific attachment locations. After dissection, we isolated and resected the proximal ulna, including the coronoid process and its soft tissue attachments. We then embedded, sectioned, and stained the specimens. The average distance from the tip of the coronoid to the proximal capsule was 2.36 +/- 0.39 mm. The average distance from the tip of the coronoid to the proximal brachialis insertion was 10.13 +/- 1.6 mm. Most coronoid tip fractures included disruption of the anterior capsule

2006 Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research

167. Coronoid fracture patterns. (Abstract)

classification systems.The following strong associations were confirmed by this study: large fractures of the coronoid process with anterior and posterior olecranon fracture-dislocations, small transverse fractures with terrible-triad injuries, and anteromedial facet fractures with varus posteromedial rotational instability pattern injuries. An awareness of these associations and their exceptions may help guide the optimal management of these injuries.Therapeutic, Level IV. (...) Coronoid fracture patterns. It has been suggested that specific types of coronoid fractures are associated strongly with specific patterns of traumatic elbow instability. This hypothesis was tested in a review of a large consecutive series of patients with a fracture of the coronoid as part of a fracture-dislocation of the elbow.One surgeon repaired 67 coronoid fractures as part of a fracture-dislocation of the elbow over a 7-year period. Each coronoid fracture was characterized on the basis

2006 Journal of Hand Surgery - American

168. Use of osteochondral bone graft in coronoid fractures. (Abstract)

Use of osteochondral bone graft in coronoid fractures. Results of the treatment of the deficient coronoid and chronic elbow instability have not been reported. The purpose of this study was to analyze the results of structural bone graft for reconstruction of the coronoid process. Structural bone graft was used to reconstruct the coronoid process of 6 patients. All injuries were of the terrible triad: fracture of the coronoid, radial head fracture, and collateral ligament disruption. All cases (...) excellent, 2 good, 1 fair, and 2 poor results. Structural bone graft may be a useful option for a deficient coronoid process and an unstable elbow, but the outcome is unpredictable.

2005 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery

169. Coronoid fracture height in terrible-triad injuries. (Abstract)

of the coronoid process of the ulna and the coronoid fracture fragment were measured on computed tomography scans of 13 patients with terrible-triad-pattern elbow injuries. Two observers performed the measurements with excellent intraobserver and interobserver reliability.The total height of the coronoid process of the ulna averaged 19 mm. The average height of the coronoid fracture fragment was 7 mm. This corresponds to an average of 35% of the total height of the coronoid process.The transverse coronoid (...) Coronoid fracture height in terrible-triad injuries. The coronoid fractures that occur in the terrible-triad pattern of traumatic elbow instability (posterior dislocation with fractures of the radial head and coronoid) usually are small transverse fragments. Attempts to classify these fragments according to height as suggested by Regan and Morrey have been inconsistent and contentious. The purpose of this study was to quantify coronoid fracture height in terrible-triad injuries.The height

2006 Journal of Hand Surgery - American

170. Standard surgical protocol to treat elbow dislocations with radial head and coronoid fractures. (Abstract)

functional outcome.We retrospectively reviewed the results of this treatment performed, at two university-affiliated teaching hospitals, in thirty-six consecutive patients (thirty-six elbows) with an elbow dislocation and an associated fracture of both the radial head and the coronoid process. Our surgical protocol included fixation or replacement of the radial head, fixation of the coronoid fracture if possible, repair of associated capsular and lateral ligamentous injuries, and in selected cases repair (...) Standard surgical protocol to treat elbow dislocations with radial head and coronoid fractures. The results of elbow dislocations with associated radial head and coronoid fractures are often poor because of recurrent instability and stiffness from prolonged immobilization. We managed these injuries with a standard surgical protocol, postulating that early intervention, stable fixation, and repair would provide sufficient stability to allow motion at seven to ten days postoperatively and enhance

2004 The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery. American Volume

171. Standard surgical protocol to treat elbow dislocations with radial head and coronoid fractures. Surgical technique. (Abstract)

postoperatively and enhance functional outcome.We retrospectively reviewed the results of this treatment performed, at two university-affiliated teaching hospitals, in thirty-six consecutive patients (thirty-six elbows) with an elbow dislocation and an associated fracture of both the radial head and the coronoid process. Our surgical protocol included fixation or replacement of the radial head, fixation of the coronoid fracture if possible, repair of associated capsular and lateral ligamentous injuries (...) Standard surgical protocol to treat elbow dislocations with radial head and coronoid fractures. Surgical technique. The results of elbow dislocations with associated radial head and coronoid fractures are often poor because of recurrent instability and stiffness from prolonged immobilization. We managed these injuries with a standard surgical protocol, postulating that early intervention, stable fixation, and repair would provide sufficient stability to allow motion at seven to ten days

2005 The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery. American Volume

172. Functional outcome after operative treatment of eight type III coronoid process fractures. (Abstract)

Functional outcome after operative treatment of eight type III coronoid process fractures. There have been few reports about surgical outcomes of coronoid process fractures. Eight cases of clinical results of type III coronoid process fractures were reviewed.Eight patients with coronoid type III fracture were retrospectively reviewed. All were men with an average age of 33 years. There were three isolated fractures, two elbow dislocations, two radial head and neck fractures, and one medial (...) for the treatment of type III coronoid process fractures. Any associated injuries to the elbow and fracture comminution were considered as important prognostic factors.

2005 Journal of Trauma

173. Medial oblique compression fracture of the coronoid process of the ulna. (Abstract)

Medial oblique compression fracture of the coronoid process of the ulna. The most widely recognized coronoid fractures have been described as occurring in the coronal plane according to the amount of process detached from the ulna. Over the last few years, we have recognized that the coronoid fracture is a much more complex injury than originally thought. This report calls attention to an oblique, medial compression fracture of the coronoid, a fracture so subtle as to be missed by routine (...) assessment but sometimes associated with joint subluxation or dislocation. The currently accepted classification system based on a simple fracture pattern in the coronal plane may be too simplistic to characterize fractures of the coronoid fully.

2005 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery

174. Fractures of the coronoid process of the ulna. (Abstract)

Fractures of the coronoid process of the ulna. The coronoid process is critical to elbow stability and is vulnerable during injury. Traumatic elbow injures are relatively uncommon, so it is important for surgeons to be mindful of the importance of specialized treatment of the coronoid for optimal elbow function. Optimal coronoid fracture fixation is determined by fracture morphology, which can usually be predicted based on the overall pattern of injury. There is evidence that improved (...) understanding of coronoid fractures and their management is improving the results of treatment.

2006 Journal of Hand Surgery - American

175. Fracture of the anteromedial facet of the coronoid process. Surgical technique. (Abstract)

Fracture of the anteromedial facet of the coronoid process. Surgical technique. Fracture of the anteromedial facet of the coronoid was recently recognized as a distinct type of coronoid fracture resulting from a varus posteromedial rotational injury force. Very few reports are available to help guide the management of these injuries.Eighteen patients with a fracture of the anteromedial facet of the coronoid process were treated over a six-year period. Twelve patients were treated for the acute (...) fracture, and six were managed after initial treatment elsewhere. All but three patients (two with concomitant fracture of the olecranon and one with a second fracture at the base of the coronoid) had avulsion of the origin of the lateral collateral ligament complex from the lateral epicondyle. The initial treatment was operative in fifteen patients and nonoperative in three. The coronoid fracture was secured with a plate applied to the medial surface of the coronoid in nine patients, a screw in one

2007 The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery. American Volume

176. Fracture of the anteromedial facet of the coronoid process. (Abstract)

Fracture of the anteromedial facet of the coronoid process. Fracture of the anteromedial facet of the coronoid was recently recognized as a distinct type of coronoid fracture resulting from a varus posteromedial rotational injury force. Very few reports are available to help guide the management of these injuries.Eighteen patients with a fracture of the anteromedial facet of the coronoid process were treated over a six-year period. Twelve patients were treated for the acute fracture, and six (...) were managed after initial treatment elsewhere. All but three patients (two with concomitant fracture of the olecranon and one with a second fracture at the base of the coronoid) had avulsion of the origin of the lateral collateral ligament complex from the lateral epicondyle. The initial treatment was operative in fifteen patients and nonoperative in three. The coronoid fracture was secured with a plate applied to the medial surface of the coronoid in nine patients, a screw in one patient

2006 The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery. American Volume

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