How to Trip Rapid Review

Step 1: Select articles relevant to your search (remember the system is only optimised for single intervention studies)

Step 2: press

Step 3: review the result, and maybe amend the or if you know better! If we're unsure of the overall sentiment of the trial we will display the conclusion under the article title. We then require you to tell us what the correct sentiment is.

665 results for

Corneal Reflex

by
...
Latest & greatest
Alerts

Export results

Use check boxes to select individual results below

SmartSearch available

Trip's SmartSearch engine has discovered connected searches & results. Click to show

81. Wearing a patch after a scratch to the eye probably makes no difference to healing

in the results suggest we can’t be certain if future trials might overturn these findings. Given that the clinical outcomes were similar, doctors treating corneal abrasion may want to incorporate patient preference and symptom relief into their decision-making. It is worth noting that there may be other reasons to patch an eye. Sometimes they are used following analgesic eye drops for example, when the blink reflex may be compromised. Citation and Funding Lim CH, Turner A, Lim BX. Cochrane Database Syst Rev (...) Wearing a patch after a scratch to the eye probably makes no difference to healing Wearing a patch after a scratch to the eye probably makes no difference to healing Discover Portal Discover Portal Wearing a patch after a scratch to the eye probably makes no difference to healing Published on 21 December 2016 doi: After a scratch or minor damage to the outer layer of the eye (corneal abrasion), wearing an eye patch is unlikely to reduce pain at 24 hours and might not lead to quicker healing

2019 NIHR Dissemination Centre

82. CRACKCast E071 – Ophthalmology Part B

and oxidizing material needs removal Need eye shielding Need IV ceftazidime Need topical erythromycin 3) List 4 options for treatment of corneal abrasions Mechanical Corneal Abrasions FB sensation, photophobia, decreased VA Pain relief with topical anesthetics diagnose the problem as corneal injury Watch for a positive Seidel’s sign – which suggests a corneal perforation Treatment Full lid eversion and examination! Contact lenses shouldn’t be worn until the abrasion is healed (3-5 days) Eye patches aren’t (...) needed! Cycloplegic prn g. Tropicamide Topical antibiotics – probably only needed for people who wear contact lenses Pseudomonal coverage if contact lens wearer (tobramycin 0.5% 1-2 drops q 4hrs) Topical analgesics: Ketorolac 0.5% QID Diclofenac 0.1% QID Tetanus immunization only needed for any “tetanus-prone” injury with dirt and organic matter NO cases of tetanus have been documented from simple corneal abrasions Symptoms should resolve by 24-72 hrs Corneal Foreign Bodies High risk features

2017 CandiEM

83. CRACKCast E071 – Ophthalmology Part A

need topical anesthetics Irrigate until pH is NORMAL Remove particulate matter from the fornices After irrigation Cycloplegic 5% erythromycin ointment QID Pain management Check IOP Severity of injury judged by corneal cloudiness Long term: scarring, symblepharon, glaucoma, cataracts Irritants, solvents, detergent, super glue, mace exposures are treated just like chemical burns Superglue: only need referral if eyelids are inverted and lashes scratching the eyeball 2) What is the treatment of UV (...) , Treatment: Warm compresses Topical ophthalmic antibiotics ***usually self-limiting without abx but they can lead to improved remission rates Trimethoprim/polymyxin; ciprofloxacin; erythromycin x 7 days AVOID steroids Culture only in cases of treatment failure Complications Corneal ulcers Keratitis Corneal perforation Key diagnoses not to miss: Neisseria Gonorrhoeae: Rapidly progressive pain and copious discharge (17-16B) Need IV abx Irrigation Topical abx Treat for chlamydia as well Viral causes: #1

2017 CandiEM

84. Final recommendation statement: vision in children ages 6 months to 5 years: screening.

in primary care settings. Visual acuity tests screen for visual deficits associated with amblyopia and refractive error. Ocular alignment tests screen for strabismus. Steroacuity tests assess depth perception. For children younger than 3 years, screening may include the fixation and follow test (for visual acuity), the red reflex test (for media opacity), and the corneal light reflex test (for strabismus). Instrument-based vision screening (i.e., with autorefractors and photoscreeners) may be used (...) in very young children, including infants. Autorefractors are computerized instruments that detect refractive errors; photoscreeners detect amblyopia risk factors (ocular alignment and media opacity) and refractive errors. Vision screening in children older than 3 years may include the red reflex test, the cover-uncover test (for strabismus), the corneal light reflex test, visual acuity tests (e.g., Snellen, Lea Symbols [Lea-Test], and HOTV [Precision Vision] charts), autorefractors and photoscreeners

2017 National Guideline Clearinghouse (partial archive)

85. Hepatitis C Screening

be screened for the hepatitis C virus. Table 1. Screening for hepatitis C virus Consider providing a patient information handout on HCV screening, which is also available as the SmartPhrase .AVSHEPCSCREENING. Eligible population Test 1,2 Frequency All adults born during 1945–1965 Hep C screening test with reflex to Hep C RNA quantitative test One time Adults and adolescents of any age with risk factors: • Current and past injection drug use. This includes patients who injected only once or many years ago (...) • Receipt of clotting-factor concentrates before 1987 • Receipt of blood transfusion or solid organ transplant before July 1992 • Receipt of long-term hemodialysis treatment • Known exposure to HCV (e.g., by accidental needle stick). See Infection Control accidental exposure policy on the staff intranet • HIV infection • Being born to an HCV antibody–positive mother Hep C screening test with reflex to Hep C RNA quantitative test One time or, if patient has ongoing risks for HCV exposure, screening

2016 Kaiser Permanente Clinical Guidelines

86. Point-of-care devices for detecting diabetic polyneuropathy

in Greece. In this study the Neuropad was compared to the neuropathic disability score, which comprises of history and examination of multiple modalities including ankle reflexes, sensation, pin-prick and temperature. The prevalence of DPN in this study population would be significantly greater than in the general population seen in primary care. However given that this device would likely only be used in patients diagnosed with diabetes in primary care, then the prevalence may be more similar (...) motor nerve action potential, PMNCV – peroneal motor nerve conduction velocity, IENFD – intraepidermal nerve fibre density, CNFD – corneal nerve fibre density, CNBD – corneal nerve branch density, CNFL – corneal nerve fibre length, DB-HRV – deep breathing heart rate variability, WPT – warm perception thresholds NC – Stat DPN Check In a study of 72 consecutive patients with diabetes from a diabetes and neuropathy outpatient clinic, patients were evaluated concurrently with conventional nerve

2016 NIHR DEC Oxford

87. Vision in Children Ages 6 Months to 5 Years: Screening

in primary care settings ( ). Visual acuity tests screen for visual deficits associated with amblyopia and refractive error. Ocular alignment tests screen for strabismus. Steroacuity tests assess depth perception. , For children younger than 3 years, screening may include the fixation and follow test (for visual acuity), the red reflex test (for media opacity), and the corneal light reflex test (for strabismus). , Instrument-based vision screening (ie, with autorefractors and photoscreeners) may be used (...) in very young children, including infants. Autorefractors are computerized instruments that detect refractive errors; photoscreeners detect amblyopia risk factors (ocular alignment and media opacity) and refractive errors. , Vision screening in children older than 3 years may include the red reflex test, the cover-uncover test (for strabismus), the corneal light reflex test, visual acuity tests (eg, Snellen, Lea Symbols [Lea-Test], and HOTV [Precision Vision] charts), autorefractors and photoscreeners

2017 U.S. Preventive Services Task Force

88. Eye Care in the Intensive Care Unit

of the vulnerable patient 4 3 Identifying disease of the eye 6 Exposure keratopathy and corneal abrasion 6 Chemosis 8 Microbial infections 8 4 Rare eye conditions in ICU 10 Red eye in a septic patient: possible endogenous endophthalmitis 10 Other problems 11 5 Delivering treatment to the eye when it is prescribed 11 Red eye in ICU patient 12 6. Systemic fungal infection and the eye for intensivists 14 7. Tips for ophthalmologists seeing patients in ICU 14 8. Authors 16 9. References 17 2017/PROF/350 3 1 Summary (...) ) or treatments (e.g. the drying effects of gas flows from CPAP or oxygen masks). In particular muscle relaxants reduce the tonic contraction of the orbicularis muscle around the eye which normally keeps the lids closed, and sedation reduces blink rate and impairs (and can eliminate) the blink reflex. Whatever the cause, those unable to close the eye for themselves, or in whom blinking rates are substantially reduced, are at increased risk of damage to the front of the eye, and this risk is higher in those

2017 Intensive Care Society

89. Post-Resuscitation Therapy in Adult Advanced Life Support

that multiple modalities of testing (clinical exam, neurophysiological measures, imaging, or blood markers) be used to estimate prognosis instead of relying on single tests or findings. 25. ANZCOR recommends using bilaterally absent pupillary light reflexes (PLRs) or the combined absence of both pupillary and corneal reflexes at least 72 hours after ROSC to predict poor outcome in patients who are comatose after resuscitation from cardiac arrest and who are treated with TTM. 26. ANZCOR suggests against (...) of clinical criteria alone before 72 hours after ROSC to estimate prognosis. 38. ANZCOR suggests that multiple modalities of testing (clinical exam, neurophysiological measures, imaging, or blood markers) be used to estimate prognosis instead of relying on single tests or findings. 39. ANZCOR recommends using the absence of PLR (or the combined absence of both pupillary and corneal reflexes) at 72 hours or greater from ROSC to predict poor outcome in patients who are comatose after resuscitation from

2016 Australian Resuscitation Council

90. Wearing a patch after a scratch to the eye probably makes no difference to healing

in the results suggest we can’t be certain if future trials might overturn these findings. Given that the clinical outcomes were similar, doctors treating corneal abrasion may want to incorporate patient preference and symptom relief into their decision-making. It is worth noting that there may be other reasons to patch an eye. Sometimes they are used following analgesic eye drops for example, when the blink reflex may be compromised. Citation and Funding Lim CH, Turner A, Lim BX. Cochrane Database Syst Rev (...) Wearing a patch after a scratch to the eye probably makes no difference to healing Wearing a patch after a scratch to the eye probably makes no difference to healing Discover Portal Discover Portal Wearing a patch after a scratch to the eye probably makes no difference to healing Published on 21 December 2016 doi: After a scratch or minor damage to the outer layer of the eye (corneal abrasion), wearing an eye patch is unlikely to reduce pain at 24 hours and might not lead to quicker healing

2018 NIHR Dissemination Centre

94. Legal and Ethical Issues related to Resuscitation

, severe cerebral disability). The earliest time to prognosticate an unfavourable neurological outcome is 72 hours after ROSC, but longer if sedative or paralytic drugs confound the situation. 9 Among predictive factors are the clinical observations of persistent coma, bilateral absent pupillary or corneal reflexes, absent motor and extensor response to pain, presence of myoclonus, absent N20 wave in somato-sensory evoked potentials, high serum values of neurological biomarkers, a marked reduction

2015 Australian Resuscitation Council

95. Quantitative measurement of horizontal strabismus with digital photography. (PubMed)

to the light reflex (RD) and corneal diameter (CD). The RD/CD ratio of each gaze angle was recorded. To estimate the eyes' gaze angle, an equation to determine the best-fit line for the gaze angle data according to each RD/CD ratio was created. In a second clinical analysis, this equation was applied to photographs of real strabismus patients (n = 72), and the results were compared with measurements taken by a double-masked strabismus specialist. Separately, an equation was created to calculate the imaging

2019 JAAPOS - Journal of the American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus

96. Decentration following femtosecond laser small incision lenticule extraction (SMILE) in eyes with high astigmatism and its impact on visual quality. (PubMed)

, China.. Patients with myopic astigmatism < 1.5D served as controls (low astigmatism group, LA). Decentration was measured using a Scheimpflug camera with a difference map of the tangential curvature at 12 months postoperatively. Also the associations between decentration from the coaxial sighted corneal light reflex (CSCLR) and the visual outcomes, correction efficacy of astigmatism, wavefront aberrations and objective scatter index (OSI) were analyzed.No significant differences were observed

2019 BMC Ophthalmology

97. UV crosslinking with riboflavin in keratoconus

), stromal thinning and corneal scars as the consequence of spontaneous corneal hydrops [4,13]. Furthermore, distorted reflex images of a placido disc or a keratometer lead to a diagnosis. Corneal computer topography can also be used for specific diagnosis; in this procedure, computer-monitored measurement of the corneal surface and structure is performed and the protrusion is displayed as a 3- dimensional coloured image [1,3,4]. So far there is no causally targeted treatment for keratoconus. The limited (...) UV crosslinking with riboflavin in keratoconus 1 Translation of Chapters 1 to 6 of the final report UV-Vernetzung mit Riboflavin bei Keratokonus (Version 1.0; Status: 7 October 2016). Please note: This translation is provided as a service by IQWiG to English-language readers. However, solely the German original text is absolutely authoritative and legally binding. Extract UV cross-linking with riboflavin in keratoconus 1 IQWiG Reports – N15-05 Extract of final report N15-05 Version 1.1 Corneal

2017 Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Healthcare (IQWiG)

98. Vyndaqel (tafamidis meglumine)

thyroid stimulating hormone decreased; blood thyroid stimulating hormone increased; blood thyroid stimulating hormone; thyroid releasing hormone challenge test abnormal; and thyroid releasing hormone challenge test. 12) Events in the MedDRA SMQ “lacrimal disorders” and PTs: dry eye; lacrimation decreased; lacrimal disorder; keratomalacia; xerophthalmia; vitamin A deficiency; vitamin A deficiency related corneal disorder; vitamin A deficiency eye disorder; vitamin A deficiency related conjunctival (...) disorder; night blindness; corneal deposits; corneal leukoma; corneal lesion; corneal degeneration; and dry skin. 13 ) Events in the MedDRA SMQ “hyperglycaemia/new onset diabetes mellitus”, HLGT “diabetic complications”, and HLTs “hyperglycaemic conditions NEC”, “diabetes mellitus (incl subtypes)”, and “carbohydrate tolerance analyses (incl diabetes)” (excluding “decreased” PTs under the HLT “carbohydrate tolerance analyses (incl diabetes)”). 16 3.(ii) Summary of pharmacokinetic studies 3.(ii

2013 Pharmaceuticals and Medical Devices Agency, Japan

99. Vestibular neuronitis

), the eyes stay fixed on the examiner. If the eyes are dragged off target by the head turn, a corrective abnormal movement (saccade) occurs as the eyes move back to fix on the examiner. Repeat several times to the same or opposite side, randomly and unpredictably, until satisfied as to the consistent presence or absence of the corrective saccade. A corrective saccade represents a positive test (disrupted vestibulo-ocular reflex) and implies moderate to severe loss of function of the horizontal semi (...) test demonstrates the presence or absence of the vestibulo-ocular reflex and therefore can be used to assess peripheral vestibular function [ ; ; ] . Vestibular neuronitis is a clinical diagnosis In review articles, experts advise that the diagnosis of vestibular neuronitis is usually made on clinical grounds, without the need for further investigation [ ; ; ]. Differential diagnosis What else might it be? Other causes of vertigo include: Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo. For more information

2017 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

100. Vertigo

and unpredictably, until satisfied as to the consistent presence or absence of the corrective saccade. A corrective saccade represents a positive test (disrupted vestibulo-ocular reflex) and implies moderate to severe loss of function of the horizontal semi-circular canal on the side to which the test is positive. Alternate cover test Alternate cover test Use the alternate cover test to examine for skew deviation. Ask the person to look at the examiner's nose, then alternately cover their right eye and left eye (...) test are also widely mentioned and recommended in the literature as part of the HINTS test (Head Impulse test for vestibulo-ocular reflex function, Nystagmus assessment, and Test of Skew deviation) — a group of oculomotor tests designed to improve bedside detection of stroke in people with acute vestibular syndrome [ ; ; ; ; ; ]. In a prospective cross-sectional study of 101 people with acute vestibular syndrome (vertigo, nystagmus, nausea/vomiting, intolerance of head movement, and gait

2017 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

To help you find the content you need quickly, you can filter your results via the categories on the right-hand side >>>>