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Contusion

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9221. What advice should we give to athletes postconcussion? Full Text available with Trip Pro

Concussion diagnosis therapy Clinical Protocols standards Humans Memory Neuropsychological Tests Referral and Consultation standards Sports Medicine standards 2002 9 28 4 0 2002 12 20 4 0 2002 9 28 4 0 ppublish 12351326 PMC1724542 Wound Repair Regen. 1999 Nov-Dec;7(6):518-27 10633012 J Head Trauma Rehabil. 1998 Apr;13(2):27-35 9575254 Am J Sports Med. 2000 Jul-Aug;28(4):499-505 10921640 Clin J Sport Med. 2001 Jul;11(3):134-43 11495317 Br J Sports Med. 2002 Feb;36(1):6-10 11867482 BMJ. 2002 Aug 24;325

2002 British Journal of Sports Medicine

9222. Problems in health management of professional boxers in Japan Full Text available with Trip Pro

. It was found that a punch that turns the head can cause serious physical damage, and it was clarified that only a simple punch, rather than accumulated damage from multiple punches, can cause cerebral concussion. Severe shock causing retrograde amnesia is very rare after a fight and disappears relatively quickly. Many additional symptoms are related to damage to the hearing organs, such as hearing difficulties, tinnitus, and vertigo, but these symptoms also resolve quickly. Many boxers experience memory

2002 British Journal of Sports Medicine

9223. The avoidability of head and neck injuries in ice hockey: an historical review Full Text available with Trip Pro

The avoidability of head and neck injuries in ice hockey: an historical review The number of minor traumatic brain injury (mTBI), cerebral concussions, is increasing and cannot be eliminated by any kind of equipment. Prevention strategies, such as the introduction of "checking from behind" rules have become effective in decreasing the number of severe spinal injuries. A new "head checking" rule should reduce mTBI in the same way in the following years. Mouthguards should be mandatory

2002 British Journal of Sports Medicine

9224. Incidence of injury in amateur rugby league sevens Full Text available with Trip Pro

40% (113.4 per 1000 playing hours) of all injuries sustained were to the lower limb (chi(2) = 5.3, df = 1, p<0.05). Contusions were the most common type of injury (113.4 per 1000 hours, 40%, chi(2) = 9.5, df = 4, p<0.05), with most (198.4 per 1000 hours, 70%, chi(2) = 31.5, df =4, p<0.001) occurring in physical collisions and tackles. An increasing injury incidence was observed over the first (99.2 per 1000 hours), second (198.4 per 1000 hours), third (347.2 per 1000 hours), and fourth (694.4 per

2002 British Journal of Sports Medicine

9225. A 16 year study of injuries to professional boxers in the state of Victoria, Australia Full Text available with Trip Pro

the Victorian Professional Boxing and Combat Sports Board.A total of 107 injuries were recorded from 427 fight participations, corresponding to an injury rate of 250.6 injuries per 1000 fight participations. The most commonly injured body region was the head/neck/face (89.8%), followed by the upper extremities (7.4%). Specifically, injuries to the eye region (45.8%) and concussion (15.9%) were the most common. About three quarters of all injuries were lacerations/open wounds or superficial. No information

2003 British Journal of Sports Medicine

9226. A 16 year study of injuries to professional kickboxers in the state of Victoria, Australia Full Text available with Trip Pro

, at an injury rate of 109.7 injuries per 1000 fight participations. The most common body region injured was the head/neck/face (52.5%), followed by the lower extremities (39.8%). Specifically, injuries to the lower leg (23.3%), the face (19.4%), and intracranial injury (17.2%) were the most common. Over 64% of the injuries were superficial bruising or lacerations.The nature of kickboxing, whereby kicking the opponent is the prime movement and the head a prime target, is reflected in the distributions

2003 British Journal of Sports Medicine

9227. Computerised neuropsychological testing Full Text available with Trip Pro

Computerised neuropsychological testing 12547735 2003 03 17 2018 11 30 0306-3674 37 1 2003 Feb British journal of sports medicine Br J Sports Med Computerised neuropsychological testing. 2-3 Collie A A CogState Ltd, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. acollie@cogstate.com Maruff P P eng Journal Article England Br J Sports Med 0432520 0306-3674 IM Brain Concussion diagnosis physiopathology therapy Diagnosis, Computer-Assisted methods Humans Neuropsychological Tests Neuropsychology Physician's Role

2003 British Journal of Sports Medicine

9228. Lacrosse stick entrapment injury to the thumb Full Text available with Trip Pro

Lacrosse stick entrapment injury to the thumb A case of injury to the left thumb following an errant stick check, and subsequent entrapment of the digit in the open sidewall of a lacrosse stick, is presented. A circumferential laceration, severe swelling, and bruising to the proximal phalanx resulted. This case report emphasises the need to limit the dimensions of openings in the sidewalls of lacrosse sticks to prevent the occurrence of this and other preventable injuries.

2003 British Journal of Sports Medicine

9229. Efficacy and tolerability of escin/diethylamine salicylate combination gels in patients with blunt injuries of the extremities. (Abstract)

: Reparil-Gel N (n = 32), Reparil-Gel (n = 31), Reparil-Sportgel (n = 32) and a placebo gel (n = 31). All patients were evaluated for efficacy (intention to treat) and tolerability. A per-protocol analysis was also carried out, in which 12 of the 126 patients were excluded due to protocol violations. The intention-to-treat and per-protocol analyses produced similar results. The patients had suffered contusions while participating in soccer, hockey, karate, tae-kwon-do, handball, American football, rugby

2001 International Journal of Sports Medicine Controlled trial quality: predicted high

9230. Escin/diethylammonium salicylate/heparin combination gels for the topical treatment of acute impact injuries: a randomised, double blind, placebo controlled, multicentre study. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Escin/diethylammonium salicylate/heparin combination gels for the topical treatment of acute impact injuries: a randomised, double blind, placebo controlled, multicentre study. To investigate the clinical efficacy and safety of escin-containing gels in the topical treatment of blunt impact injuries.Competitors in soccer, handball, or karate competitions were enrolled within two hours of sustaining a strain, sprain, or contusion and treated three times with the trial gel within a period of eight

2002 British Journal of Sports Medicine Controlled trial quality: predicted high

9231. bruising

bruising bruising - General Practice Notebook This site is intended for healthcare professionals General Practice Notebook | Medical search bruising Bruising is the extravasation of blood from the damaged vessels into the subcutaneous tissue (1). It can generally be divided into: normal - caused by unintentional or accidental trauma (2) abnormal - those with an underlying haemostatic abnormality, such as an inherited bleeding disorder or those who have been subjected to non-accidental injury (...) (NAI) Bruising is more obvious in white skinned people than in people with darker skin tones. The incidence also increases with increasing family size and during the summer months (when children play outside in lightweight clothing) (1) Elderly people are also at increased risk of bruising due to poor skin and subcutaneous tissue turgor, decreased fatty tissue, ambulatory problems relating to cognitive impairment, neurological or physical disorders, effects of medications and nutritional factors (3

2010 GP Notebook

9232. pinhead sized bruises

pinhead sized bruises pinhead sized bruises - General Practice Notebook This site is intended for healthcare professionals General Practice Notebook | Medical search pinhead sized bruises Petechiae are purpura of less than 1 cm diameter which may be caused by: thrombocytopenia platelet dysfunction small vessel disease Rarely, but not uncommonly, children can develop petechiae in a periorbital and sometimes superior vena caval distribution following bouts of vigourous coughing or vomiting. Links

2010 GP Notebook

9233. bruise

bruise bruise - General Practice Notebook This site is intended for healthcare professionals General Practice Notebook | Medical search bruise Bruising is the extravasation of blood from the damaged vessels into the subcutaneous tissue (1). It can generally be divided into: normal - caused by unintentional or accidental trauma (2) abnormal - those with an underlying haemostatic abnormality, such as an inherited bleeding disorder or those who have been subjected to non-accidental injury (NAI (...) ) Bruising is more obvious in white skinned people than in people with darker skin tones. The incidence also increases with increasing family size and during the summer months (when children play outside in lightweight clothing) (1) Elderly people are also at increased risk of bruising due to poor skin and subcutaneous tissue turgor, decreased fatty tissue, ambulatory problems relating to cognitive impairment, neurological or physical disorders, effects of medications and nutritional factors (3

2010 GP Notebook

9234. concussion

concussion This page does not exist - General Practice Notebook This site is intended for healthcare professionals | | Medical search This page does not exist The information provided herein should not be used for diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed medical practitioner should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Copyright 2016 Oxbridge Solutions Ltd®. Any distribution or duplication of the information contained herein is strictly

2010 GP Notebook

9235. contusion injury to the eye

contusion injury to the eye contusion injury to the eye - General Practice Notebook This site is intended for healthcare professionals General Practice Notebook | Medical search contusion injury to the eye Blunt trauma to the eye is often caused during recreation; the two typical examples are of a squash ball and a champagne cork. Possible types of lesions of the eye include: black eye subconjunctival haemorrhage corneal abrasion iris - hypaema lens dislocations retinal injury optic nerve

2010 GP Notebook

9236. Sports concussion: management and predictors of outcome. (Abstract)

Sports concussion: management and predictors of outcome. Interest in sports concussion has grown widely in the last two decades among laypersons and medical professionals. Significant contributions of evidence-based research have led to a better understanding of this multifaceted, but still often elusive, injury. This information has transformed all aspects of concussion management, from on-field evaluation through return-to-play guidelines. The aim of this article is to highlight important (...) research regarding predictors of outcome and treatment protocols. This research has been the basis of the paradigm shift from traditional concussion grading scales to individualized care. Today, concussion management requires a patient-centered approach with individualized assessment, including risk factor analysis, neurocognitive testing, and a thorough symptom evaluation.

2009 Current Sports Medicine Reports

9237. The management of sports-related concussion: current status and future trends. (Abstract)

The management of sports-related concussion: current status and future trends. This article provides a review of current trends in the management of sports-related concussion. An evidence-based approach to concussion management is presented with a specific focus on return-to-play issues. The use of neuropsychological testing and other diagnostic tools is presented and reviewed.

2009 Clinics in Sports Medicine

9238. Differential emotional responses of varsity athletes to concussion and musculoskeletal injuries. (Abstract)

Differential emotional responses of varsity athletes to concussion and musculoskeletal injuries. To determine if athletes with concussion and those with minor musculoskeletal injuries experienced differential emotional response to injury.A prospective longitudinal cohort study.University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada.Thirty-four injured athletes from Canadian Interuniversity Sport (CIS) and 19 healthy, physically active undergraduate students participated in the study.All participants completed (...) the Profile of Mood States (POMS; short version) on 3 nonconsecutive days during a 2-week period after a baseline test.Emotional responses were assessed using the POMS. The 7 main outcome measures assessed by POMS were tension, depression, anger, vigor, fatigue, confusion, and total mood disturbance.After injury, concussion produced an emotional profile characterized by significantly elevated fatigue and decreased vigor. In contrast, athletes with musculoskeletal injuries displayed a significant increase

2009 Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine

9239. Understanding of sport concussion by the parents of young rugby players: a pilot study. (Abstract)

Understanding of sport concussion by the parents of young rugby players: a pilot study. Establish the knowledge and beliefs of the parents of high school rugby players about concussion.Descriptive cross-sectional intercept style face-to-face pilot survey.The survey was conducted during high school rugby games.Two hundred parents of male high school rugby players who were attending their teenagers' games.Exploratory analysis of the closed- and open-ended questionnaire. Concussion signs (...) and symptoms were subsequently mapped onto the framework of the Sport Concussion Assessment Tool.Most parents (83%; 165 of 198) reported that they were able to recognize a concussion in their teenager and provide a list of well-accepted signs and symptoms. Nearly all (96%; 188 of 196) were aware of the risks of continuing to play while concussed, and approximately half (51%; 99 of 196) were aware of return-to-play guidelines/recommendations after a concussion.Parents of male high school rugby players

2009 Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine

9240. The relationship of athlete-reported concussion symptoms and objective measures of neurocognitive function and postural control. Full Text available with Trip Pro

The relationship of athlete-reported concussion symptoms and objective measures of neurocognitive function and postural control. Concussed athlete evaluations often include symptoms, balance, and neurocognitive assessments. We sought to identify the relationship between subjective symptom reports and objective clinical measures.A retrospective assessment.A research laboratory.Concussed collegiate-level athletes (N = 32, 19.7 years) evaluated pre- and postinjury (less than 48 hours).Each athlete (...) completed an inventory of concussion-related symptoms, the NeuroCom Sensory Organization Test (SOT), and ImPACT neurocognitive assessment. Spearman correlations between balance symptoms and SOT scores and cognitive symptoms and ImPACT scores were completed.Symptoms related to balance and cognitive deficits, SOT composite balance and visual, vestibular, and somatosensory ratios, and ImPACT output scores.Significant Spearman correlations were noted between reports of "dizziness" and the SOT composite

2009 Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine

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