How to Trip Rapid Review

Step 1: Select articles relevant to your search (remember the system is only optimised for single intervention studies)

Step 2: press

Step 3: review the result, and maybe amend the or if you know better! If we're unsure of the overall sentiment of the trial we will display the conclusion under the article title. We then require you to tell us what the correct sentiment is.

9,495 results for

Contusion

by
...
Latest & greatest
Alerts

Export results

Use check boxes to select individual results below

SmartSearch available

Trip's SmartSearch engine has discovered connected searches & results. Click to show

9201. Snowblading injuries in Eastern Canada Full Text available with Trip Pro

with traumatic injury related to their sport were included. A concussion was defined as any loss of consciousness, amnesia, confusion, disorientation, vertigo, or headache that resulted from injury. The ski patroller reported helmet use on the accident report at the time of injury.Snowbladers present with a unique pattern of injury compared with skiers and snowboarders. The incidence of leg, knee, and ankle/foot injuries were 20.5%, 25.6%, and 10.3% respectively. Concussions represented 11% of all injuries (...) . There was no increase in other injury, including neck injury, related to helmet use.Unique injury patterns in snowbladers warrant reconsideration of equipment design. Concussion is a common injury on the ski slope. Although the effects of helmet use on concussion rate are inconclusive based on this study, helmet use did not increase the rate of neck injury, even when adjusted for age.

2003 British Journal of Sports Medicine

9202. Injuries in professional footballers. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Injuries in professional footballers. The incidence of injuries in footballers is described. Nearly half of footballer's injuries involve the knee, with vertical tearing of the meniscus being common; surgical intervention may be required. Approximately one third of injuries involve the ankle, and will often require immobilisation. Other injuries include muscle damage, spondylosis of L4 or L5, concussion, and dislocations. The importance of prompt and correct treatment of injuries is emphasised.

1981 British Journal of Sports Medicine

9203. Association football injuries to the brain. A preliminary report. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Association football injuries to the brain. A preliminary report. In 1975 the authors sent a questionnaire to all players in the Norwegian First Division League Clubs to record the incidence of head injuries due to heading. The conclusion of the questionnaire is that there seems to be a low percentage of serious head injuries. None of the players had been operated on for epi- or subdural hematoma or other brain damage and only a few have had concussion due to heading. In sixty per cent

1981 British Journal of Sports Medicine

9204. Waterbike injuries. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Waterbike injuries. Jet skiing is a rapidly growing sport. The craft incorporate safety features and the manufacturers issue detailed safety instructions. Racing is conducted with adequate attention to clothing, safety and insurance. However, casual use is widespread and is sometimes irresponsible. Serious injuries to riders are uncommon: dental and knee injuries are described. A case of renal contusion and a head injury were caused by other riders and two potentially fatal injuries illustrate

1991 British Journal of Sports Medicine

9206. Injury rates during the 1988 US Olympic Team Trials for taekwondo. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Injury rates during the 1988 US Olympic Team Trials for taekwondo. Injury rates were recorded during the 1988 US Olympic Team Trials for taekwondo involving 48 men and 48 women. The injury rate for men (12.74/100 athlete-exposures) was about 40 per cent higher than the rate for women (9.01/100 athlete-exposures). The foot and the head were the most frequently injured body parts. Contusions were the predominant type of injury, and concussions were recorded for both men and women. A large

1989 British Journal of Sports Medicine

9207. Injury surveillance in a rugby tournament. Full Text available with Trip Pro

. The most serious injury was a concussion and the majority of the injuries affected soft tissues. Anatomically, the lower limbs suffered most injuries (46.8%), followed by the head (21.3%), trunk (17.0%), and upper limbs (12.8%). Slightly more injuries occurred in the defensive half of the field of play (53.2%) than in the offensive half (46.8%). More injuries occurred in the second half (61.7%) than in the first half (38.3%).Protective equipment should be introduced to minimise the number

1996 British Journal of Sports Medicine

9208. Head injuries in sport. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Head injuries in sport. Injuries to the head and neck are the most frequent catastrophic sports injury, and head injuries are the most common direct athletic cause of death. Although direct compressive forces may injure the brain, neural tissue is particularly susceptible to injury from shearing stresses, which are most likely to occur when rotational forces are applied to the head. The most common athletic head injury is concussion, which may very widely in severity. Intracranial haemorrhage

1996 British Journal of Sports Medicine

9209. Paediatric sports injuries in Hong Kong: a seven year survey. Full Text available with Trip Pro

and field, with sprinting and middle distance running accounting for 42 injuries, and 28 children were injured while cycling. Most of the injuries (85%) were classified as non-serious, but 15% of children presented with a total of 21 fractures, two joint dislocations, five concussions, and seven torn knee ligaments.Children sports participation in Hong Kong, although not at high level and not as widespread as in the West, accounts for significant morbidity. These injuries should be carefully monitored

1996 British Journal of Sports Medicine

9210. Sports injuries in women: a one-year prospective follow-up study at an outpatient sports clinic. Full Text available with Trip Pro

differed from those of men. In women acute dislocations, contusions, and fractures were significantly less common in men, while women had more frequent stress-related sports injuries. In both sexes the most common sites of trouble were knee, ankle, and lower back, but in women as opposed to men, the metatarsal area, the toes, and the sole were among the ten most usual sites of the injury. Fourteen women (4%) and 49 men (6%) required operative treatment of the injury. The knee was the most common site

1987 British Journal of Sports Medicine

9211. Not everything that jerks is epilepsy. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Not everything that jerks is epilepsy. 9298547 1997 10 21 2018 11 13 0306-3674 31 3 1997 Sep British journal of sports medicine Br J Sports Med Not everything that jerks is epilepsy. 173 Chadwick D D Department of Neurological Science, Walton Centre for Neurology & Neurosurgery, Liverpool. eng Journal Article England Br J Sports Med 0432520 0306-3674 IM S Athletic Injuries complications Brain Concussion complications Epilepsy diagnosis Female Head Injuries, Closed complications Humans Male

1997 British Journal of Sports Medicine

9212. Study of aeroball injuries. Full Text available with Trip Pro

on the incidence of ankle injury was recorded.The lower limb received most injuries (90%), followed by the upper limb (6%), then the face (3%) and cervical spine (1%). The most common category of injuries was sprains (83%), followed by fractures (8%), contusions (5%), and dislocations (4%). The most common site of injury was the ankle (73%). It is during doubles play that injury is most likely to occur. Since the introduction of ankle supports, there has been a gradual decline in the incidence of ankle injury

1997 British Journal of Sports Medicine

9213. A prospective epidemiological study of injuries in four English professional football clubs Full Text available with Trip Pro

) injuries in competition in the 15 minute periods at the end of each half. Strains (41%), sprains (20%), and contusions (20%) represented the major types of injury. The thigh (23%), the ankle (17%), knee (14%), and lower leg (13%) represented the major locations of injury, with significantly (p < 0.01) more injuries to the dominant body side. Reinjury counted for 22% of all injuries. Only 12% of all injuries were caused by a breach of the rules of football, although player to player contact was involved

1999 British Journal of Sports Medicine

9214. Injuries in whitewater kayaking Full Text available with Trip Pro

severity.Of the 392 kayaking respondents included in the final analysis, 219 suffered 282 distinct injury events. The number of days spent kayaking per season was the only independent predictor of injury. The overwhelming majority of injuries occurred while the kayaker was still in the boat (87%). Striking an object was the most common mechanism of injury (44%), followed by traumatic stress and overuse (25% each). The most common types of injury were abrasion (25%), tendinitis (25%), contusion (22

2001 British Journal of Sports Medicine

9215. The medicolegal aspects of automatism in mild head injury Full Text available with Trip Pro

The medicolegal aspects of automatism in mild head injury 11579055 2001 12 04 2018 11 13 0306-3674 35 5 2001 Oct British journal of sports medicine Br J Sports Med The medicolegal aspects of automatism in mild head injury. 288-90 McCrory P P Neurologist & Sports Physician, 31 Grosvenor Parade, Balwyn Victoria 3103, Australia. pmccrory@compuserve.com eng Journal Article Review England Br J Sports Med 0432520 0306-3674 IM Amnesia etiology Australia Automatism diagnosis etiology Brain Concussion

2001 British Journal of Sports Medicine

9216. Computerised cognitive assessment of athletes with sports related head injury Full Text available with Trip Pro

Computerised cognitive assessment of athletes with sports related head injury Professional and amateur participants in many sports are at risk of brain injury caused by impact with other players or objects. In many cases, mild cognitive deficits may persist after the common neurological signs of brain injury have passed. In recent years, the athlete's cognitive status after concussion has been measured with conventional "paper and pencil" neuropsychological tests. However, such tests

2001 British Journal of Sports Medicine

9217. Skateboarding injuries of today Full Text available with Trip Pro

to the University Hospital of Umeå. This is the only hospital in the area, serving a population of 135 000.Three of the 139 injured were pedestrians hit by a skateboard rider; the rest were riders. The age range was 7-47 years (mean 16). The severity of the injuries was minor (AIS 1) to moderate (AIS 2); fractures were classified as moderate. The annual number of injuries increased during the study period. Fractures were found in 29% of the casualties, and four children had concussion. The most common fractures

2001 British Journal of Sports Medicine

9218. Ethics, molecular biology, and sports medicine Full Text available with Trip Pro

Ethics, molecular biology, and sports medicine 11375868 2001 08 02 2008 11 20 0306-3674 35 3 2001 Jun British journal of sports medicine Br J Sports Med Ethics, molecular biology, and sports medicine. 142-3 eng Editorial England Br J Sports Med 0432520 0306-3674 0 CACNA1A protein, human 0 Calcium Channels E IM Brain Concussion complications Brain Edema etiology genetics Brain Injuries genetics Calcium Channels genetics Ethics, Medical Humans Publishing Sports Medicine trends 129287 VF 9.5.1

2001 British Journal of Sports Medicine

9219. Effectiveness of headgear in a pilot study of under 15 rugby union football Full Text available with Trip Pro

Effectiveness of headgear in a pilot study of under 15 rugby union football To determine whether protective headgear reduced the incidence of concussion in a pilot study of under 15 rugby union.Sixteen under 15 rugby union teams were recruited from three interschool competitions in metropolitan Sydney and the adjacent country region. A prospective study was undertaken over a single competitive season. The study had two arms: a headgear arm and a control arm. Headgear wearing rates and injury (...) data were reported to the investigators and verified using spot checks.A total of 294 players participated in the study. There were 1179 player exposures with headgear and 357 without headgear. In the study time frame, there were nine incidences of concussion; seven of the players involved wore headgear and two did not. There was no significant difference between concussion rates between the two study arms.Although there is some controversy about the desirability of wearing protective headgear

2001 British Journal of Sports Medicine

9220. Impact energy attenuation performance of football headgear Full Text available with Trip Pro

against impacts of greater severity. Repeated tests using a drop height of 0.3 m showed that some helmets exhibit a "memory" effect, whereby impact performance is reduced by up to 50% with repeated impacts.Laboratory tests indicate that current commercially available football headgear performance will not reduce the likelihood of concussion. The absence of internationally recognised standards for soft headgear designed to ameliorate concussion is a major deficiency in sports injury prevention.

2000 British Journal of Sports Medicine

To help you find the content you need quickly, you can filter your results via the categories on the right-hand side >>>>