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Contusion

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9181. Child abuse and neglect presentations to a pediatric emergency department. (Abstract)

and the father in 21% of cases. Bruises were the most frequent injury reported, seen in 25% of cases. The mean age of the patients was 6.4 years old. They averaged 4.6 previous PED visits. The majority of patients lived near the hospital. Sixty-nine percent of the patients presented for care between the hours of 5 PM and 9 AM. Most of the patients claimed their primary physician was located in a clinic near their home (44%). Only 12.7% were unsure of their primary physician. Significantly more victims (89

2002 Journal of Emergency Medicine

9182. The Ras inhibitor S-trans, trans-farnesylthiosalicylic acid exerts long-lasting neuroprotection in a mouse closed head injury model. Full Text available with Trip Pro

here by investigating the effect of the Ras inhibitor S-trans, trans-farnesylthiosalicylic acid (FTS) in a mouse model of closed head injury (CHI). Mice subjected to CHI were treated systemically 1 h later with FTS (5 mg/kg) or vehicle. After 1 h, Ras-GTP in the contused hemisphere showed a significant (3.8-fold) increase, which was strongly inhibited by FTS (82% inhibition) or by the NMDA-receptor antagonist MK-801 (53%). Both drugs also decreased active (phosphorylated) extracellular signal (...) -regulated kinase. FTS prevented the CHI-induced reduction in NMDAR binding in cortical, striatal, and hippocampal regions, measured by [3H]-MK-801 autoradiography, and decreased lesion size by 50%. It also reduced CHI-induced neurologic deficits, indicated by the highly significant (P < 0.0001) 60% increase in extent of recovery. Thus, FTS provided long-term neuroprotection after CHI, rescuing NMDAR binding in the contused hemisphere and profoundly reducing neurologic deficits. These findings suggest

2003 Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism

9183. Responses of posttraumatic pericontusional cerebral blood flow and blood volume to an increase in cerebral perfusion pressure. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Responses of posttraumatic pericontusional cerebral blood flow and blood volume to an increase in cerebral perfusion pressure. In and around traumatic contusions, cerebral blood flow (CBF) is often near or below the threshold for ischemia. Increasing cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) in patients with head injuries may improve CBF in these regions. However, the pericontusional response to this intervention has not been studied. Using positron emission tomography (PET), we have quantified (...) the response to an increase in CPP in and around contusions in 18 contusions in 18 patients. Regional CBF and cerebral blood volume (CBV) were measured with PET at CPPs of 70 and 90 mmHg using norepinephrine to control CPP. Based upon computed tomography, regions of interest (ROIs) were placed as two concentric ellipsoids, each of 1-cm width, around the core of the contusions. Measurements were compared with a control ROI in tissue with normal anatomic appearance. Baseline CBF and CBV increased

2003 Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism

9184. Serious winter sport injuries in children and adolescents requiring hospitalization. (Abstract)

% and snowboarders 26% of injuries; 3% of injuries were snowmobile-or luge-related. Leading mechanisms of injury were ground level falls (50%), crashes into trees, (18%), and falls from ski lift (13%). Approximately 26% of the patients met criteria for trauma-team activation. Leading diagnoses were head injury (20%), femur fracture (18%), and concussion (11%). Five patients required admission to the intensive care unit. The median injury severity score (ISS) was 7; 8% of patients had an ISS score > 15

2003 American Journal of Emergency Medicine

9185. Spreading the word on sports concussion: citation analysis of summary and agreement, position and consensus statements on sports concussion. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Spreading the word on sports concussion: citation analysis of summary and agreement, position and consensus statements on sports concussion. the growing concern over concussion in sports has led to the publication of five major summary and agreement, position and consensus statements since 2000. The dissemination of information from these statements is largely unknown and difficult to quantify, but their impact on the research community can be quantified by analysing the number of citations (...) to these key publications. The purpose of this review is to report the number and pattern of citations to the key published statements on sports concussion.Web of Science, Scopus and PubMed were searched from 2000 to mid-December 2009 using two different search strategies. The first strategy used the search terms 'concussion' and 'first author' of the statement article, while the second used the 'title' of the target article as the key search term.the publications resulting from the three 'Concussion

2010 British Journal of Sports Medicine

9186. Examining Sport Concussion Assessment Tool ratings for male and female youth hockey players with and without a history of concussion. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Examining Sport Concussion Assessment Tool ratings for male and female youth hockey players with and without a history of concussion. Concussion is one of the most commonly occurring injuries in sport today. The Sport Concussion Assessment Tool (SCAT) is a commonly used paper neurocognitive tool. To date, little is known about SCAT baseline normative values in youth athletes.The purpose of this study was to determine normative values on the SCAT for male and female youth hockey players.This (...) is a secondary data analysis of pooled data from three prospective cohort studies examining the risk of injury in paediatric ice hockey players aged 9-17 years. A preseason baseline demographic and injury history questionnaire was completed by each player.A total of 4193 players completed SCATs at baseline and were included in the analysis. 781 players (18.6%) reported a previous history of concussion. Fatigue and low energy followed by headache were the most commonly reported symptoms in all players

2010 British Journal of Sports Medicine

9187. Skiing injuries: a study from a Danish community. Full Text available with Trip Pro

) and contusions (19). Injuries requiring hospitalization were common. None of these resulted in permanent major disability.

1990 British Journal of Sports Medicine

9188. Football injuries in Oslo: a one-year study. Full Text available with Trip Pro

matches, 695 players were injured giving an incidence of 34.5 injuries/10,000 player matches. The injuries occurred all year with a peak in June. Sprains accounted for 41% of the injuries, 23% were contusions and 19% fractures. Most injuries (59%) affected the legs. Hospital admission was required for three females and 57 males. The football injuries required 1966 consultations and necessitated that 349 patients had to stay away from work for a total of 6137 days.

1984 British Journal of Sports Medicine

9189. Injuries in orienteering. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Injuries in orienteering. In a one-year prospective study of 42 elite orienteers, 73 recent injuries (1.7 per runner per year) were found. Acute injuries totalled 52% and 48% were due to overuse. Ankle sprains made up 37% of acute injuries while the remaining were mainly contusions caused by falls or bumps against branches or rocks. Medial shin pain, Achilles peritendinitis, peroneal tenosynovitis and iliotibial band friction syndrome were the most frequent overuse injuries. All overuse

1986 British Journal of Sports Medicine

9190. What's in a name? Full Text available with Trip Pro

What's in a name? 11579052 2001 12 04 2008 11 20 0306-3674 35 5 2001 Oct British journal of sports medicine Br J Sports Med What's in a name? 285-6 McCrory P P eng Editorial England Br J Sports Med 0432520 0306-3674 IM Brain Concussion classification diagnosis Glasgow Coma Scale Humans Terminology as Topic 2001 10 2 10 0 2002 1 5 10 1 2001 10 2 10 0 ppublish 11579052 PMC1724378

2001 British Journal of Sports Medicine

9191. The kick with the stick Full Text available with Trip Pro

suffered a microscooter accident. There were five head injuries: three facial lacerations, one fractured mandible, and one cerebral concussion. One patient showed clinical signs of a cervical whiplash injury without radiological findings. There were also two cases of finger laceration and two of muscular contusions of the lower extremities.Although only a small proportion of the trauma cases were the result of riding microscooters, a system of injury surveillance should be started. Furthermore

2001 British Journal of Sports Medicine

9192. Ice hockey injuries: a 4-year prospective study of a Swedish élite ice hockey team. Full Text available with Trip Pro

practice was 2.6 per 1000 player-practice hours and 74.1 per 1000 player-game hours. Nuisance injuries (without any later absence) and minor injuries (absence < 1 week) constituted the vast majority (95.2%) and only 4.8% (18 cases) were classified as moderate or major injuries (absence > 1 week). Of the injuries 85% were caused by trauma and 15% by overuse. Injuries were most often localized to the lower limb (37.8%) and head/face (31.4%). The commonest injuries were contusions, lacerations/wounds

1993 British Journal of Sports Medicine

9193. Orofacial injuries and the use of mouthguards by the 1984 Great Britain Rugby League touring team. Full Text available with Trip Pro

, a reduction in the risk of fracture of the mandible, and a reduction in the concussion force from a blow to the mandible (Clegg, 1969; Upson, 1982; Davies et al, 1977). Of the 28 players interviewed, only 7 (25%) wore mouthguards, the commonest reason for not using a mouthguard being difficulty with breathing, a finding in common with other similar surveys (Davies et al, 1977). In view of the fact that 17 (60.7%) had sustained oral injuries - dental and jaw injuries, intra-oral and circumoral lacerations

1985 British Journal of Sports Medicine

9194. Rugby football injuries, 1980-1983. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Rugby football injuries, 1980-1983. The injuries sustained by the boys at one English public school have been recorded and analysed by age, experience, position, phase, duration of the game and of the season. Few injuries have been serious. Detailed reference is made to concussion, injuries from collapsed scrums and injuries of the cervical spine. The paper emphasises that the tackle leads to most injuries. This paper presents the Rugby football injuries sustained by the boarders of Rugby (...) figures with those recorded in the Accident and Emergency Department of Christchurch Hospital during the 1979 New Zealand Rugby football season (Inglis and Stewart, 1981); Table XIV records information on three aspects of Rugby football that have occasioned much recent concern, viz:--Time off playing after concussion, injuries caused by collapsed scrums and neck injuries.

1985 British Journal of Sports Medicine

9195. Orofacial injuries and mouthguards: a study of the 1984 Wallabies. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Orofacial injuries and mouthguards: a study of the 1984 Wallabies. As mouthguards provide protection of the teeth, jaws, adjacent soft tissues and also protect the brain against concussion following impacts to the mandible, the use of mouthguards in contact sports is strongly recommended. It is therefore essential to gauge regularly the use of mouthguards in the various contact sports at all levels of competition. Of the 30 members of the 1984 Australian Rugby Union Touring Team (the Wallabies

1985 British Journal of Sports Medicine

9196. Outcome of sports injuries treated in a casualty department. Full Text available with Trip Pro

injuries. Injuries to the lower extremity predominated. At follow-up, ligamentous injuries of the lower extremity were the major cause of discomfort. Further, in the group of patients with persistent discomfort 36% had suffered a fracture or a dislocation, 13% a contusion and 10% a wound. The mean period of sports incapacity after a sustained injury was 3 weeks. In track and field events the injury seldom disturbed training for more than one week, but in soccer, indoor ball games, skiing and skating

1985 British Journal of Sports Medicine

9197. The epidemiology of ice hockey injuries. Full Text available with Trip Pro

The epidemiology of ice hockey injuries. As part of the injury profylaxes in Denmark a questionnaire investigation was undertaken in 14 randomly chosen ice hockey teams--out of 266 players, 210 answered (79%). The injury incidence per player per 1000 hours was 4.7, i.e. 1.5 in training and 38.0 in match. Half of the injuries were localised to the head (28%) and lower extremities (27%), 19% to the upper extremities and 7% to the back. Of these 48% were contusions. Knee and elbow injuries were

1986 British Journal of Sports Medicine

9198. Sports injuries survey on university students in Hong Kong. Full Text available with Trip Pro

and the commonest ones were abrasion (37%), contusion (21%), cramp (20%), sprains (9%), and strains (7%). Of the injuries 80% recovered in less than 10 days and 50% of them were self-treated. However, a significant group of more severe injuries was recorded: fracture, concussion and heat stroke which demanded special medical attention and longer period for recovery. The pattern of treatment was also unique in that traditional Chinese methods of treatment were sought more frequently than special orthopaedic

1984 British Journal of Sports Medicine

9199. Soccer injuries of youth. Full Text available with Trip Pro

were injured more often than boys. There were 81% of all injuries localised to the lower extremity, especially the ankle and foot. Contusion was the most frequent diagnosis, amounting to a third of all injuries. Blisters and exoriations amounted to nearly a fifth, 4% of the injuries were fractures, especially in the upper extremity; overuse injuries were seen only in 5.2% of the cases. Based on examination of the injury pattern in these children, injuries of youth seem to be relatively rare

1985 British Journal of Sports Medicine

9200. Injuries in sailboard enthusiasts. Full Text available with Trip Pro

boardsailing, but only 15 per cent reported significant injuries. The most common reported injuries included lacerations, jellyfish stings, abrasions, muscle strain, sunburn, contusions, and blisters. A small number of athletes reported ligament sprain, ear infection, knee injury, eye injury, and splinters. The large majority of injuries reported are preventable by wearing protective gear, applying sunscreen, avoiding overpowering winds, and selecting safe sailing areas. Four per cent of water-sport

1988 British Journal of Sports Medicine

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