How to Trip Rapid Review

Step 1: Select articles relevant to your search (remember the system is only optimised for single intervention studies)

Step 2: press

Step 3: review the result, and maybe amend the or if you know better! If we're unsure of the overall sentiment of the trial we will display the conclusion under the article title. We then require you to tell us what the correct sentiment is.

4,430 results for

Congenital Heart Disease Imaging in Adults

by
...
Alerts

Export results

Use check boxes to select individual results below

SmartSearch available

Trip's SmartSearch engine has discovered connected searches & results. Click to show

161. Lonsurf (trifluridine / tipiracil) - adult patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC)

Lonsurf (trifluridine / tipiracil) - adult patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) 30 Churchill Place ? Canary Wharf ? London E14 5EU ? United Kingdom An agency of the European Union Telephone +44 (0)20 3660 6000 Facsimile +44 (0)20 3660 5520 Send a question via our website www.ema.europa.eu/contact 25 February 2016 EMA/CHMP/287846/2016 Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use (CHMP) Assessment report Lonsurf International non-proprietary name: trifluridine / tipiracil Procedure (...) study report CTCAE: Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events CV: Coefficient of variation CYP: Cytochrome P450 DCR: Disease control rate DNA: Deoxyribonucleic acid DPD: Dihydropyridine dehydrogenase DR: Duration of response EC: European Commission ECG: Electrocardiogram ECOG: Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group eCRF: Electronic case report form EGFR: Epidermal growth factor receptor EMA: European medicines agency EP: European Pharmacopoeia EU: European Union EMA/CHMP/287846/2016 Page 5/106 FAS

2016 European Medicines Agency - EPARs

162. ACR/SIR/SPR Practice Parameter for Specifications and Performance of Image-Guided Percutaneous Drainage/Aspiration of Abscesses and Fluid Collections (PDAFC)

, and treatment of disease. The variety and complexity of human conditions make it impossible to always reach the most appropriate diagnosis or to predict with certainty a particular response to treatment. Therefore, it should be recognized that adherence to the guidance in this document will not assure an accurate diagnosis or a successful outcome. All that should be expected is that the practitioner will follow a reasonable course of action based on current knowledge, available resources, and the needs (...) of the benefits, alternatives, and risks of the procedures. The physician must have a thorough understanding of imaging anatomy (including congenital and developmental variants), the imaging equipment to be used during the procedures, radiation safety considerations, and physiologic monitoring equipment. The physician must also have access to adequate supplies and personnel to perform the procedure safely. PDAFC procedures must be performed by a physician who has the following qualifications. The physician’s

2018 Society of Interventional Radiology

163. Optimal Use of Ionizing Radiation in Cardiovascular Imaging

with regard to childhood and teenage radiation exposure that tissue weighting factors do not take into account the increased sensitivity of the tissue of the pediatric population. Thus, for children and adolescents, a given radiation exposure confers a greater risk than the same exposure would confer to an adult population. In addition, children who do not have life threatening disorders have a long life expectancy, which provides a longer period for radiation-induced illness to present (13). 4.2 (...) Optimal Use of Ionizing Radiation in Cardiovascular Imaging EXPERT CONSENSUS DOCUMENT 2018 ACC/HRS/NASCI/SCAI/SCCT Expert Consensus Document on Optimal Use of Ionizing Radiation in Cardiovascular Imaging: Best Practices for Safety and Effectiveness A Report of the American College of Cardiology Task Force on Expert Consensus Decision Pathways Developed in Collaboration With Mended Hearts Writing Committee Members John W. Hirshfeld, JR, MD, FACC, FSCAI, Chair Victor A. Ferrari, MD, FACC, Co

2018 American College of Cardiology

164. Appropriate Use Criteria: Imaging of the Head & Neck

. These include: ¾ Oncologic imaging – Considerations include the type of malignancy and the point along the care continuum at which imaging is requested ¾ Conditions which span multiple anatomic regions – Examples include certain gastrointestinal indications or congenital spinal anomalies Repeated Imaging In general, repeated imaging of the same anatomic area should be limited to evaluation following an intervention, or when there is a change in clinical status such that imaging is required to determine next (...) the guidelines for specific imaging exams is a determination that the following are true with respect to the imaging request: ? A clinical evaluation has been performed prior to the imaging request (which should include a complete history and physical exam and review of results from relevant laboratory studies, prior imaging and supplementary testing) to identify suspected or established diseases or conditions. ? For suspected diseases or conditions: ? Based on the clinical evaluation, there is a reasonable

2018 AIM Specialty Health

165. Appropriate Use Criteria: Imaging of the Chest

-52.e75. 26. Ghaye B, Szapiro D, Dacher JN, et al. Percutaneous ablation for atrial fibrillation: the role of cross-sectional imaging. Radiographics. 2003;23:S19-S33. 27. Gilkeson RC, Ciancibello L, Zahka K. Multidetector CT evaluation of congenital heart disease in pediatric and adult patients. AJR Am J Roentgenol. 2003;180(4):973-980. 28. Hansell DM, Bankier AA, MacMahon H, McLoud TC, Müller NL, Remy J. Fleischner Society: glossary of terms for thoracic imaging. Radiology. 2008;246(3):697-722 (...) , depending on the specific clinical indication. Technology Considerations ? In the majority of clinical situations, chest radiographs should be performed prior to advanced imaging with CT, preferably within 30 days of the chest CT exam request. ? CT chest is not appropriate for cardiac and coronary artery imaging. Please see guidelines for cardiac CT and CCTA. ? When the purpose of the study is imaging of the heart, including the coronary arteries, do not request both a chest CT and a dedicated cardiac

2018 AIM Specialty Health

166. Appropriate Use Criteria: Imaging of the Abdomen & Pelvis

. These include: ¾ Oncologic imaging – Considerations include the type of malignancy and the point along the care continuum at which imaging is requested ¾ Conditions which span multiple anatomic regions – Examples include certain gastrointestinal indications or congenital spinal anomalies Repeated Imaging In general, repeated imaging of the same anatomic area should be limited to evaluation following an intervention, or when there is a change in clinical status such that imaging is required to determine next (...) the guidelines for specific imaging exams is a determination that the following are true with respect to the imaging request: ? A clinical evaluation has been performed prior to the imaging request (which should include a complete history and physical exam and review of results from relevant laboratory studies, prior imaging and supplementary testing) to identify suspected or established diseases or conditions. ? For suspected diseases or conditions: ? Based on the clinical evaluation, there is a reasonable

2018 AIM Specialty Health

167. The 2016 International Society for Heart Lung Transplantation listing criteria for heart transplantation: A 10-year update

, published in 2006. 1 Subsequently, the ISHLT commissioned a focused update to concentrate on evolving areas of importance, not fully addressed previously. These include congenital heart disease (CHD), restrictive cardiomyopathy, and infectious diseases. In addition, we undertook a review of all 2006 guidelines to update those where new information was evident or evolution in practice demanded signi?cant changes. Section I (general considerations): A review and revision of the 2006 guideline All (...) of diagnostic right-heart catheterization Right heart catheterization (RHC) should be performed on all candidates in preparation for listing for cardiac transplantation and annually until transplantation (Class 1, Level of Evidence: C). Right heart catheterization (RHC) should be performed on all adult candidates in preparation for listing for cardiac transplantation and periodically until transplantation (Class 1, Level of Evidence: C). Periodic RHC is not advocated for routine surveillance in children

2016 International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation

168. Heart Failure Full Text available with Trip Pro

. Strong FOR Low Invasive coronary angiography should be considered in patients with heart failure associated with refractory angina, resuscitated cardiac arrest, sustained ventricular arrhythmias, or with evidence of ischaemic heart disease on other investigations, or an intermediate-to-high pretest probability for coronary artery disease, to determine the need for coronary revascularisation. Strong FOR Low Either computed tomography (CT) coronary angiography or cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR (...) receptor neprilysin inhibitor; AV, atrioventricular; BNP, B-type natriuretic peptide; BP, blood pressure; bpm, beats per minute; CABG, coronary artery bypass graft; CMR, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging; CRT, cardiac resynchronisation therapy; CT, computed tomography; ECG, electrocardiogram; DCM, dilated cardiomyopathy; GRADE, Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation; HFrEF, heart failure with reduced ejection fraction; ICD, implantable cardioverter defibrillator; LGE, late

2018 Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand

169. Evaluation and Management of Right-Sided Heart Failure

, is associated with poor clinical outcomes independently of the underlying mechanism of disease: across the spectrum of left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction (EF) in patients with acute and chronic heart failure (HF), after cardiac surgery, acute myocardial infarction (MI), congenital heart disease (CHD), and PH. To distinguish right-sided HF (RHF) from structural RVD, we define RHF as a clinical syndrome with signs and symptoms of HF resulting from RVD. RHF is caused by the inability of the RV to support (...) of right-sided heart failure (RHF) include, among others, primary cardiomyopathies with right ventricular (RV) involvement, RV ischemia and infarction, volume loading caused by cardiac lesions associated with congenital heart disease and valvular pathologies, and pressure loading resulting from pulmonic stenosis or pulmonary hypertension from a variety of causes, including left-sided heart disease. Progressive RV dysfunction in these disease states is associated with increased morbidity and mortality

2018 International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation

170. AIM Clinical Appropriateness Guidelines for Diagnostic Coronary Angiography

such as SCORE or Framingham); OR ? Congenital heart disease with suspected coexistent CAD and either of the following ? To exclude coexistent atheromatous CAD in patients undergoing surgical repair of congenital heart disease who have moderate or high risk of CAD (SCORE); OR ? To evaluate patients with suspected congenital anomalous coronary artery abnormalitiesDiagnostic Coronary Angiography | Copyright © 2018. AIM Specialty Health. All Rights Reserved. 7 References 1. American College of Cardiology (...) al. ACC/AHA Guidelines for coronary angiography: A report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on practice guidelines (Committee on Coronary Angiography). Developed in collaboration with the Society for Cardiac Angiography and Interventions. J Am Coll Cardiol. 1999; 33(6):1756-1824. 10. Shaw LJ, Peterson ED, Shaw LK, et al. Use of a prognostic treadmill score in identifying diagnostic coronary disease subgroups. Circulation. 1998; 98(16):1622–30. 11. Warnes

2018 AIM Specialty Health

171. ACC/AHA/HRS Guideline on the Evaluation and Management of Patients With Bradycardia and Cardiac Conduction Delay

. Evaluation of Conduction Disorders 86 7.5. Management of Conduction Disorders (With 1:1 Atrioventricular Conduction) 92 8. Special Populations 95 8.1. Perioperative Management 95 8.1.1. Patients at Risk for Bradycardia During Noncardiac Surgery or Procedures 95 8.1.2. Postoperative Bradycardia and Conduction Disorders After Cardiac Surgery 96 8.2. Bradycardia Management for Adult Congenital Heart Disease 107 8.3. Management of Bradycardia in Patients With an Acute MI 109 8.4. Neurologic Disorders 111 (...) ) Expert consensus statement on the diagnosis and treatment of postural tachycardia syndrome, inappropriate sinus tachycardia, and vasovagal syncope HRS 2015 (S1.4-20) Expert consensus statement on the recognition and management of arrhythmias in adult congenital heart disease PACES/HRS 2014 (S1.4-21) Expert consensus statement on the use of implantable cardioverter-defibrillator therapy in patients who are not included or not well represented in clinical trials HRS/ACC/AHA 2014 (S1.4-22) Expert

2018 American College of Cardiology

172. Interdisciplinary Models for Research and Clinical Endeavors in Genomic Medicine: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association

to cardiovascular medicine—cardiac repolarization, blood lipid levels, and coronary artery disease—were reported in 2006 and 2007 and were followed in the ensuing years by the reporting of GWASs for numerous cardiovascular traits and diseases. Two considerations have made it imperative to recruit large study populations, often numbering >100 000 individuals, to perform these GWASs. First, common DNA variants by their nature typically make only small contributions to clinical phenotypes; that is, they have small (...) to a large degree, comparable to rare variants responsible for mendelian disorders (several-fold increase in risk). For example, a genomic risk score comprising 50 DNA variants associated with coronary artery disease separated individuals in the top quintile versus those in the bottom quintile of the score by 1.91-fold difference in risk of incident coronary events. Furthermore, DNA variants identified by GWASs tend to lie in noncoding regions of the genome, making it less clear which genes

2018 American Heart Association

173. Interventions to Improve the Labour Market Situation of Adults with Physical and/or Sensory Disabilities in Low? and Middle?Income Countries: A Systematic Review Full Text available with Trip Pro

and structures, often identified as symptoms or signs of health conditions (i.e., diseases, injuries, and disorders). 2 As such, the terms ‘impairment’ and ‘health condition’ are often used interchangeably (a practice adopted in this review). The following additional definitions and restrictions also apply. Definitions . Physical impairment is defined as problems with the structure, development, or function of the bones, muscles, joints, and/or central nervous system. Physical characteristics may include (...) of participants with the following types of health condition/physical impairments were eligible for the review: communicable diseases (e.g., leprosy); metabolism disorders (e.g., diabetes); respiratory conditions (e.g., asthma); neurological impairments (e.g., multiple sclerosis, epilepsy, those associated with brain injury); musculoskeletal conditions (e.g., arthritis, amputations); cardiovascular diseases; and body disfigurements (e.g., burn injuries). For sensory impairments, eligibility for the review

2015 Campbell Collaboration

174. The Australian guideline for prevention, diagnosis and management of acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease

susceptibility to ARF. 3 ARF is a condition seen predominantly in children aged 5–14 years, although recurrent episodes may continue well into the fourth decade of life. Because RHD represents the cumulative heart damage of previous ARF episodes, the prevalence of RHD peaks in the third and fourth decades of life. 3 Therefore, although ARF is a disease with roots in childhood, its effects are felt throughout adulthood, especially in the young adult years when people might otherwise be at their most (...) ) Australian Indigenous Doctors’ Association (AIDA) Australasian Society for Infectious Diseases (ASID) Council of Remote Area Nurses (CRANA) Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand (CSANZ) Internal Medicine Society of Australia and New Zealand (IMSANZ) National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO) National Heart Foundation of Australia Public Health Association of Australia (PHAA) Royal Australian College of General Practitioners (RACGP) Society of Obstetric Medicine

2012 Clinical Practice Guidelines Portal

175. A Guide to Utilization of the Microbiology Laboratory for Diagnosis of Infectious Diseases: 2018 Update by the Infectious Diseases Society of America and the American Society for Microbiology Full Text available with Trip Pro

laboratory in infectious disease diagnosis calls for a close, positive working relationship between the physician/advanced practice provider and the microbiologists who provide enormous value to the healthcare team. This document, developed by experts in laboratory and adult and pediatric clinical medicine, provides information on which tests are valuable and in which contexts, and on tests that add little or no value for diagnostic decisions. This document presents a system-based approach rather than (...) and collecting specimens for analysis for a disease process. It is very easy to access critical information about a specific body site just by consulting the table of contents. Within each chapter, there is a table describing the specimen needs regarding a variety of etiologic agents that one may suspect as causing the illness. The test methods in the tables are listed in priority order according to the recommendations of the authors and reviewers. When room temperature is specified for a certain time period

2018 Infectious Diseases Society of America

176. Cardiovascular management in pregnancy: congenital heart disease. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Cardiovascular management in pregnancy: congenital heart disease. The population of adults with CHD continues to expand,and thus the number of women with CHD who contemplate pregnancy or become pregnant is also growing. Mothers with low-risk defects can be managed by general cardiologist,whereas those with more complex defects should be managed by or with the assistance of ACHD cardiologists. It is important to acknowledge that all patients with CHD may have unique anatomy or physiology (...) , despite their classification as having a simple, moderate, or complex defect. As such, clinicians evaluating these patients should have adequate knowledge and expertise when assessing patient's risk for pregnancy,when performing imaging or hemodynamic studies, and when managing these patients during pregnancy. The American Board of Medical Specialties has recently recognized ACHD as a subspecialty of cardiovascular disease to treat the specialized needs of these patients in adulthood. ACHD experts can

2014 Circulation

177. White Matter Microstructure and Cognition in Adolescents with Congenital Heart Disease. Full Text available with Trip Pro

White Matter Microstructure and Cognition in Adolescents with Congenital Heart Disease. To describe the relationship between altered white matter microstructure and neurodevelopment in children with dextro-transposition of the great arteries (d-TGA).We report correlations between regional white matter microstructure as measured by fractional anisotropy (FA) and cognitive outcome in a homogeneous group of adolescents with d-TGA. Subjects with d-TGA (n = 49) and controls (n = 29) underwent (...) diffusion tensor imaging and neurocognitive testing. In the group with d-TGA, we correlated neurocognitive scores with FA in 14 composite regions of interest in which subjects with d-TGA had lower FA than controls.Among the patients with d-TGA, mathematics achievement correlated with left parietal FA (r = 0.39; P = .006), inattention/hyperactivity symptoms correlated with right precentral FA (r = -0.39; P = .006) and left parietal FA (r = -0.30; P = .04), executive function correlated with right

2014 Journal of Pediatrics

178. Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment (PDQ®): Health Professional Version

disease after mantlefield irradiation for Hodgkin's disease in long-term follow-up. Radiother Oncol 51 (1): 35-42, 1999. [ ] Hancock SL, Tucker MA, Hoppe RT: Factors affecting late mortality from heart disease after treatment of Hodgkin's disease. JAMA 270 (16): 1949-55, 1993. [ ] Heidenreich PA, Schnittger I, Strauss HW, et al.: Screening for coronary artery disease after mediastinal irradiation for Hodgkin's disease. J Clin Oncol 25 (1): 43-9, 2007. [ ] Dabaja B, Cox JD, Buchholz TA: Radiation (...) therapy can still be used safely in combined modality approaches in patients with Hodgkin's lymphoma. J Clin Oncol 25 (1): 3-5, 2007. [ ] Swerdlow AJ, Higgins CD, Smith P, et al.: Myocardial infarction mortality risk after treatment for Hodgkin disease: a collaborative British cohort study. J Natl Cancer Inst 99 (3): 206-14, 2007. [ ] van Nimwegen FA, Schaapveld M, Cutter DJ, et al.: Radiation Dose-Response Relationship for Risk of Coronary Heart Disease in Survivors of Hodgkin Lymphoma. J Clin Oncol

2018 PDQ - NCI's Comprehensive Cancer Database

179. Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment (PDQ®): Health Professional Version

of cardiovascular disease after treatment for aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Blood 107 (7): 2912-9, 2006. [ ] Darrington DL, Vose JM, Anderson JR, et al.: Incidence and characterization of secondary myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myelogenous leukemia following high-dose chemoradiotherapy and autologous stem-cell transplantation for lymphoid malignancies. J Clin Oncol 12 (12): 2527-34, 1994. [ ] Stone RM, Neuberg D, Soiffer R, et al.: Myelodysplastic syndrome as a late complication following autologous (...) : PDQ modification of REAL classification of lymphoproliferative diseases Plasma cell disorders. (Refer to the PDQ summary on for more information.) Bone. Extramedullary. Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance. Plasmacytoma. Multiple myeloma. Amyloidosis. HL. (Refer to the PDQ summary on for more information.) Nodular sclerosis HL. Lymphocyte-rich classical HL. Mixed-cellularity HL. Lymphocyte-depleted HL. Indolent lymphoma/leukemia. Follicular lymphoma (follicular small-cleaved cell

2018 PDQ - NCI's Comprehensive Cancer Database

180. Multimodality Imaging in an Adult Patient with Scimitar Syndrome Full Text available with Trip Pro

Multimodality Imaging in an Adult Patient with Scimitar Syndrome The "Scimitar syndrome" is a rare congenital anomaly characterized by combination of partial or complete pulmonary venous return from the right lung to the inferior vena cava either above or below the diaphragm together with hypoplasia of the right lung and sometimes systemic arterial supply to the right lung. In this case, multimodality imaging findings such as the vein draining into the inferior vena cava, the presence (...) of hypertrophied and dilated right ventricle, the absence of other cardiac abnormalities, displacement of the heart without malrotation and the mediastinum to the right, normal bronchial and vascular continuity in the whole lung, absence of pulmonary sequestration and systemic collaterals, normal perfusion and systolic functions of the left ventricle were reported.

2014 Molecular Imaging and Radionuclide Therapy

To help you find the content you need quickly, you can filter your results via the categories on the right-hand side >>>>