How to Trip Rapid Review

Step 1: Select articles relevant to your search (remember the system is only optimised for single intervention studies)

Step 2: press

Step 3: review the result, and maybe amend the or if you know better! If we're unsure of the overall sentiment of the trial we will display the conclusion under the article title. We then require you to tell us what the correct sentiment is.

3,769 results for

Congenital Heart Disease Imaging in Adults

by
...
Alerts

Export results

Use check boxes to select individual results below

SmartSearch available

Trip's SmartSearch engine has discovered connected searches & results. Click to show

161. Catheter Interventions in Congenital Heart Disease Without Regular Catheterization Laboratory Equipment: The Chain of Hope Experience in Rwanda. (PubMed)

Catheter Interventions in Congenital Heart Disease Without Regular Catheterization Laboratory Equipment: The Chain of Hope Experience in Rwanda. This report describes the feasibility and safety of cardiac catheterization in a developing country without access to a regular cardiac catheterization laboratory. The equipment used for imaging consisted of a monoplane conventional C-arm X-ray system and a portable ultrasound machine using the usual guidewires and catheters for cardiovascular access (...) . In this study, 30 patients, including 17 children younger than 2 years and 2 adults, underwent catheterization of the following cardiac anomalies: patent ductus arteriosus (20 patients) and pulmonary valve stenosis (9 patients, including 2 patients with critical stenosis and 3 patients with a secundum atrial septal defect). Except for two cases requiring surgery, the patients were treated successfully without complications. They all were discharged from hospital, usually the day after cardiac

2012 Pediatric Cardiology

162. Myocardial Perfusion and Scarring in Congenital Heart Disease

with a physical exam and medical history. Blood and urine samples will be collected. Participants will have a cardiac MRI scan to look at the blood flow to the heart. Participants will also have a heart stress test to measure heart function during exercise. Other imaging studies of the heart may be performed to collect more information on heart function. Condition or disease Congenital Heart Disease Detailed Description: This is a study of the perfusion of the myocardium in adults with specific forms (...) the heart. This damage can be studied with a heart imaging test called a cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan. Researchers want to use this type of scan to look at the blood supply to the heart in people with congenital heart disease. Objectives: - To learn more about the blood supply to the heart in people with congenital heart disease. Eligibility: - Individuals at least 18 years of age who have heart defects caused by congenital heart disease. Design: Participants will be screened

2012 Clinical Trials

163. Value of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Noninvasive Risk Stratification in Tetralogy of Fallot (PubMed)

imaging in noninvasive risk stratification to predict major adverse clinical outcomes.This multicenter study included 575 adult patients with TOF (4.083 patient-years at risk) from a prospective nationwide registry in whom CMR was performed. This study involved 5 tertiary referral centers with a specialized adult congenital heart disease unit. Multivariable Cox hazards regression analysis was performed to determine factors associated with the primary end point. The CMR variables were combined (...) Value of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Noninvasive Risk Stratification in Tetralogy of Fallot Adults late after total correction of tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) are at risk for major complications. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging is recommended to quantify right ventricular (RV) and left ventricular (LV) function. However, a commonly used risk model by Khairy et al requires invasive investigations and lacks CMR imaging to identify high-risk patients.To implement CMR

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2017 JAMA cardiology

164. Infective Endocarditis in Adults: Diagnosis, Antimicrobial Therapy, and Management of Complications

transesophageal echocardiography; and TTE, transthoracic echocardiography. Figure. An approach to the diagnostic use of echocardiography (echo). Rx indicates prescription; TEE, transesophageal echocardiography; and TTE, transthoracic echocardiography. *For example, a patient with fever and a previously known heart murmur and no other stigmata of infective endocarditis (IE). †High initial patient risks include prosthetic heart valves, many congenital heart diseases, previous endocarditis, new murmur, heart (...) on Jump to Free Access article Infective Endocarditis in Adults: Diagnosis, Antimicrobial Therapy, and Management of Complications A Scientific Statement for Healthcare Professionals From the American Heart Association , MD, FAHA , MD , MD , MD, MHS , MD, MSc , PharmD, MPH , MD, PhD , DDS , MD, FAHA , MD , MD, FAHA , MD , MD , PhD, RN and MD, FAHA PhD, FAHA Larry M. Baddour , Walter R. Wilson , Arnold S. Bayer , Vance G. FowlerJr , Imad M. Tleyjeh , Michael J. Rybak , Bruno Barsic , Peter B. Lockhart

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2016 Infectious Diseases Society of America

165. AIM Clinical Appropriateness Guidelines for Genetic Testing for Hereditary Cardiac Disease

with an isolated type 2 or 3 Brugada pattern on EKG. In most cases, the primary value of genetic testing for Brugada syndrome is to benefit at-risk family members. Short QT Syndrome Short QT syndrome (SQTS) is a congenital, inherited, primary electric disorder of the heart characterized by abnormally short QT intervals on the surface ECG (<360 ms) and an increased proclivity to develop atrial and/or ventricular tachyarrhythmias (Gussak 2005). SQTS is a genetically heterogeneous disease caused by mutations (...) Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is characterized by enlargement of the left ventricle of the heart and systolic impairment, in the absence of abnormal loading conditions or coronary artery disease sufficient to cause global systolic dysfunction (Haas 2015). The symptoms of DCM are similar to heart failure including shortness of breath, chest pain/tightness, fainting episodes and cardiac arrhythmias. The most serious complication of DCM is sudden, irregular heart rhythms that can be life threatening. Some

2019 AIM Specialty Health

166. Management of Cardiovascular Diseases during Pregnancy

and offspring complications 3174 3.3.3 Pregnancy heart team 3176 3.4 Cardiovascular diagnosis in pregnancy 3176 3.4.1 Electrocardiography 3176 3.4.2 Echocardiography 3176 3.4.3 Exercise testing 3177 3.4.4 Ionizing radiation exposure 3177 3.4.5 Chest radiography and computed tomography 3177 3.4.6 Cardiac catheterization 3177 3.4.7 Magnetic resonance imaging 3177 3.5 Genetic testing and counselling 3177 3.5.1 Pre-natal diagnosis 3178 3.6 Foetal assessment 3178 3.6.1 Screening for congenital heart disease 3178 (...) 3.10.4 In vitro fertilization 3181 3.11 Recommendations 3182 4. Congenital heart disease and pulmonary hypertension 3182 4.1 Introduction 3182 4.2 Pulmonary hypertension and Eisenmenger’s syndrome 3183 4.2.1 Pulmonary hypertension 3183 4.2.2 Eisenmenger’s syndrome 3183 4.2.3 Cyanotic heart disease without pulmonary hypertension 3184 4.3 Specific congenital heart defects 3184 4.3.1 Left ventricular outflow tract obstruction 3184 4.3.2 Atrial septal defect 3184 4.3.3 Ventricular septal defect 3184

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2018 European Society of Cardiology

167. Diagnosis and Management of Glycogen Stored Diseases type VI and IX a practice resource of ACMG

difficulties and overnight irritability are common. Due to the protean and nonspecific symptoms in GSDs VI and IX, they are almost certainly underdiagnosed. GSD IX has been diagnosed in adults who were being evaluated for hepatic cirrhosis. Unlike GSD I, lactic acid and uric acid concentrations are usually normal, 24 although postprandial lactic acid can be elevated. 25 Clinical variability in GSD VI Glycogen storage disease type VI (GSD VI) has variable severity and can present in infancy/early childhood (...) Diagnosis and Management of Glycogen Stored Diseases type VI and IX a practice resource of ACMG Diagnosis and management of glycogen storage diseases type VI and IX: a clinical practice resource of the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics (ACMG) A full list of authors and affiliations appears at the end of the paper. Disclaimer This practice resource is designed primarily as an educational resource for medical geneticists and other clinicians to help them provide quality medical

2019 American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics

168. Evidence-Based Guideline: Evaluation, Diagnosis, and Management of Congenital Muscular Dystrophy

dystroglycanopathies (2 Class II studies e44,e45 and 1 Class III study e46 ). Question 1d. For children with suspected CMD, how accurately does muscle imaging predict the subtype-specific diagnosis? There were 3 Class I articles and 1 Class III article. In the first Class I article, children with suspected neuromuscular disease underwent qualitative muscle ultrasound. Ultrasound distinguished normal from diseased muscle with a sensitivity of 81% and specificity of 96%. A highly characteristic central shadow (...) commonly associated with Walker –Warburg syndrome than previously thought. e25,e86 Some rare CMDs share features of both CMDs and congenital myopathies. These include SEPN1-related myopathy (rigid spine MD/multiminicore disease), integrin a-7 deficiency, lamin-associated CMD, and a CMD with mitochondrial structural abnormalities. Two small Class III studies found associations between SEPN1 mutations and patients with multiminicore myopathy. e87,e88 Another Class III study demonstrated that ITGA7

2013 American Association of Neuromuscular & Electrodiagnostic Medicine

169. Prescription for a healthy heart: pediatric-driven partnerships

well in the field, while accelerating advancements for CHD treatment. To start, congenital heart disease, a structural abnormality of the heart or of the blood vessels surrounding it, is the most common birth defect and occurs in about one in every 100 live births, affecting 40,000 babies born in the U.S. each year. One million children and 1.4 million adults in the U.S. have CHD. Over the past 15 years, pediatric cardiologists have cut mortality rates for CHD in half. Gratefully, now instead (...) congenital heart patients to board-certified adult congenital heart disease (ACHD) specialists, a better fit than internists or pediatric cardiologists. Adults with congenital heart defects should have their heart examined at least once by a specialist and those with complex needs should meet with a specialist at least every two years. More than 300 board-certified ACHD specialists practice in the U.S. and the field is growing. The third ACHD board exam takes place this year. Over the next few decades, I

2019 KevinMD blog

170. Fast Hearts and Funny Currents, Part 2: Is Tachycardia Part of the Problem in Heart Failure?

per minute (bpm) but otherwise normal sinus rhythm. Patients with congenital heart disease, primary valvular disease, a myocardial infarction in the past 2 months, ventricular pacing for greater than 40% of each day, atrial fibrillation or flutter, or symptomatic hypotension were excluded. Patients were randomized to either placebo or ivabradine 5 mg twice daily, which was titrated during 4-month follow-up visits over 2 years to a target heart rate of 50-60 bpm. The minimum acceptable dose (...) Fast Hearts and Funny Currents, Part 2: Is Tachycardia Part of the Problem in Heart Failure? Fast Hearts and Funny Currents, Part 2: Is Tachycardia Part of the Problem in Heart Failure? – Clinical Correlations Search Fast Hearts and Funny Currents, Part 2: Is Tachycardia Part of the Problem in Heart Failure? May 25, 2011 8 min read By Santosh Vardhana Faculty Peer Reviewed Mr. M is a 63-year old man with a history of coronary artery disease and systolic congestive heart failure (ejection

2011 Clinical Correlations

171. Bone changes in congenital cyanotic heart disease. (PubMed)

Bone changes in congenital cyanotic heart disease. 5020720 1972 06 28 2018 11 13 0007-0769 34 4 1972 Apr British heart journal Br Heart J Bone changes in congenital cyanotic heart disease. 412-7 Singh H H Parkash A A Saini M M Wahi P L PL eng Journal Article England Br Heart J 0370634 0007-0769 AIM IM Adolescent Adult Ankle diagnostic imaging Arm diagnostic imaging Bone Marrow Bone and Bones diagnostic imaging Child Child, Preschool Female Fibula diagnostic imaging Heart Defects, Congenital (...) complications diagnostic imaging Hematocrit Hemoglobinometry Humans Infant Leukocyte Count Male Osteoarthropathy, Secondary Hypertrophic diagnostic imaging Pelvis diagnostic imaging Polycythemia complications Radiography Reticulocytes Skull diagnostic imaging Spine diagnostic imaging Tibia diagnostic imaging 1972 4 1 1972 4 1 0 1 1972 4 1 0 0 ppublish 5020720 PMC458494 Am J Med. 1955 Jan;18(1):51-65 13218038 Ann Intern Med. 1958 Mar;48(3):660-8 13521593 Acta Haematol. 1958 Apr-May;19(4-5):253-62 13558973

Full Text available with Trip Pro

1972 British Heart Journal

172. Effects of Dietary Sodium and Potassium Intake on Chronic Disease Outcomes and Risks

No. 18-EHC009-EF June 2018ii Key Messages Purpose of Review To synthesize the evidence regarding the effects of dietary sodium reduction and increased potassium intake on blood pressure and risk for cardiovascular diseases (CVD) and renal disease outcomes and related risk factors. Key Messages • Decreasing dietary sodium intake most likely reduces blood pressure in normotensive adults and more so in those with hypertension. • Higher sodium intake may be associated with greater risk for developing (...) (CVD), diabetes, or obesity and that assessed blood pressure (BP), incident hypertension, achievement of prespecified blood pressure goals, all-cause mortality, CVD morbidity and mortality, coronary heart disease morbidity and mortality, stroke, myocardial infarction, renal morbidity and mortality, kidney stones, and adverse events. We extracted data, assessed risk of bias (RoB, or study quality), summarized and synthesized results, and evaluated the strength of the evidence (SoE) supporting

2018 Effective Health Care Program (AHRQ)

173. Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in Infants and Children With Cardiac Disease

of English-language articles from 1966 to 2015, cross-referencing congenital and acquired heart disease with pertinent MESH search terms, as follows: acute cardiac tamponade; acute kidney injury; adoles- cent; adult; amiodarone; aortic valve insufficiency/sur - gery; aortic valve stenosis/congenital; aortic valve steno- sis/surgery; aortic valve stenosis/therapy; arrhythmias, cardiac; atropine; bicarbonates; biomarkers; calcium; cardiac arrest; cardiac catheterization; cardiac output, low; cardiac (...) Chitra Ravishankar, MD Ricardo A. Samson, MD Ravi R. Thiagarajan, MBBS, MPH Rune Toms, MD James Tweddell, MD, FAHA Peter C. Laussen, MBBS, Co-Chair On behalf of the American Heart Association Congenital Cardiac Defects Committee of the Council on Cardiovascular Disease in the Young; Council on Clinical Cardiology; Council on Cardiovascular and Stroke Nursing; Council on Cardio- vascular Surgery and Anesthe- sia; and Emergency Cardiovas- cular Care Committee Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in Infants

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2018 American Heart Association

174. Sodium and Potassium Intake: Effects on Chronic Disease Outcomes and Risks

-EHC009-EF June 2018ii Key Messages Purpose of Review To synthesize the evidence regarding the effects of dietary sodium reduction and increased potassium intake on blood pressure and risk for cardiovascular diseases (CVD) and renal disease outcomes and related risk factors. Key Messages • Decreasing dietary sodium intake most likely reduces blood pressure in normotensive adults and more so in those with hypertension. • Higher sodium intake may be associated with greater risk for developing (...) (CVD), diabetes, or obesity and that assessed blood pressure (BP), incident hypertension, achievement of prespecified blood pressure goals, all-cause mortality, CVD morbidity and mortality, coronary heart disease morbidity and mortality, stroke, myocardial infarction, renal morbidity and mortality, kidney stones, and adverse events. We extracted data, assessed risk of bias (RoB, or study quality), summarized and synthesized results, and evaluated the strength of the evidence (SoE) supporting

2018 Effective Health Care Program (AHRQ)

175. Task Force 2: Pediatric Cardiology Fellowship Training in Noninvasive Cardiac Imaging

-dimensional, and speckle tracking to assess global and regional deformation, color Doppler imaging, as well as pulsed and continuous- wave spectral Doppler imaging for flow, hemodynamics, and tissue motion. Cardiac MRI refers to anatomic and functional cardiovascular MRI for assessment of congenital heart disease (CHD) in children and adults, as well as for assessment of acquired forms of heart disease in children. 1.3. Levels of Expertise—Core and Advanced Innovations in the field of echocardiography (...) in February 2015. It was endorsed by the American Society of Echocardiography and approved by the ACC in March 2015. This document is considered current until the SPCTPD revises or withdraws it. 1.2. Background and Scope For over 25 years, noninvasive cardiac imaging has been the mainstay of anatomic and physiological assessment in pedi- atric cardiology and congenital heart disease. An ACC/AAP/ AHA combined task force published pediatric noninvasive car- diac imaging training guidelines in 2005

2015 American Heart Association

176. Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment (PDQ®): Health Professional Version

dehydrogenase, uric acid, and phosphorus. Radiographic examination. Computed tomography (CT) of the neck, chest, abdomen, and pelvis; or metabolic imaging (fluorine F 18-fludeoxyglucose positron emission tomography [PET]) with PET-CT. HIV testing. Hepatitis B and C serology. All stages of adult HL can be subclassified into A and B categories: B for those with defined general symptoms (described below) and A for those without B symptoms. The B designation is given to patients with any of the following (...) significant predictors of ischemic heart disease, congestive heart failure, arrhythmias, and vascular disease.[ ] In a cohort of 7,033 HL patients, MI mortality risk persisted for 25 years after first treatment with supradiaphragmatic radiation therapy (dependent on the details of treatment planning), doxorubicin, or vincristine.[ , ] The use of subcranial blocking did not reduce the incidence of fatal MI in a retrospective review, perhaps because of the exposure of the proximal coronary arteries

2018 PDQ - NCI's Comprehensive Cancer Database

177. Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment (PDQ®): Health Professional Version

is similar to that of other low-grade lymphomas, especially diffuse, small lymphocytic lymphoma/chronic lymphocytic leukemia.[ , - ] If the viscosity relative to water is greater than four, the patient may have manifestations of hyperviscosity. Plasmapheresis is useful for temporary, acute symptoms (such as retinopathy, congestive heart failure, and central nervous system [CNS] dysfunction) but can be combined with chemotherapy for prolonged control of the disease. Symptomatic patients with a serum (...) with concomitant HCV infection, the majority attain a complete or partial remission after loss of detectable HCV RNA with treatment using interferon-alpha with or without ribavirin.[ ][ ] Mediterranean abdominal lymphoma The disease variously known as Mediterranean abdominal lymphoma, heavy–chain disease, or immunoproliferative small intestinal disease (IPSID), which occurs in young adults in eastern Mediterranean countries, is another version of MALT lymphoma, which responds to antibiotics in its early stages

2018 PDQ - NCI's Comprehensive Cancer Database

178. Task Force 7: Pediatric Cardiology Fellowship Training in Pulmonary Hypertension, Advanced Heart Failure, and Transplantation

• Interactions and relationships between the right and left ventricles in normal physiology and in the setting of pul- monary vascular diseases • Pathophysiology of congenital heart disease with intra- cardiac or arterial level shunt, including Eisenmenger physiology • Physiology of the patient with pulmonary artery hypertension (PAH) that is due to pulmonary venous hypertension 2.2.2.2. Clinical Evaluation, Imaging, and Hemodynamics • Identify the common presenting symptoms and physical examination findings (...) in patients with PH with and with- out congenital heart disease. • Identify the common presenting signs and symptoms of right and left heart failure. • Indications, risks, and benefits of techniques commonly used to evaluate patients with PH, including electrocardi- ography, echocardiography, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, cardiac computed tomography, ventilation, and perfusion lung scans • Indications, risks, and benefits of cardiac catheterization and vasodilator testing 2.2.2.3. Classification

2015 American Heart Association

179. A consensus document for the selection of lung transplant candidates: 2014 - An update from the Pulmonary Transplantation Council of the International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation

that this document is a consensus document rather than a guideline, grading of levels of evidence and recommendations was not undertaken. Instead, as noted previously, a comprehensive literature search and consensus expert opinion have been presented. In all instances, the Writing Committee adhered to the ISHLT Standards and Guidelines Document Development Protocol (update January 2013). General candidacy consid era tions Lung transplantation should be considered for adults with chronic, end-stage lung disease (...) and mortality, it is important to consider the overall sum of contraindications and comorbidities. The following lists are not intended to include all possible clinical scenarios but rather to highlight common areas of concern. Absolute contraindication s • Lung transplantation should not be offered to adults with a recent history of malignancy. A 2-year disease-free interval combined with a low predicted risk of recurrence after lung transplantation may be reasonable, for instance, in non-melanoma

2015 International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation

180. Transthoracic Echocardiography in Adult Patients with Ischemic Stroke

abnormalities: Valvular heart disease (with and without AF), LA/LA atrial appendage thrombus, LV thrombus, prosthetic valve, atrial myxoma, akinetic LV segment (wall motion abnormality), cardiomyopathy, LA spontaneous echo contrast, ASA, mitral valve prolapse, mitral annulus calcification, mitral stenosis, and PFO. What is the cost effectiveness of transthoracic echocardiography for identifying cardiac sources of emboli in adult patients with ischemic stroke? No studies reported on the cost effectiveness (...) echocardiography and transoesophageal echocardiography for identifying cardiac sources of emboli in adult patients with ischemic stroke? A 2014 health technology assessment with systematic review and diagnostic meta-analysis 18 compared echocardiography with other diagnostic imaging methods (including TOE) for the detection of a cardiac risk factors for TIA or stroke. The reviewers searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsychINFO, Web of Science, the Cochrane Library, and CINAHL using terms related to stroke and TTE

2014 Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health - Rapid Review

To help you find the content you need quickly, you can filter your results via the categories on the right-hand side >>>>