How to Trip Rapid Review

Step 1: Select articles relevant to your search (remember the system is only optimised for single intervention studies)

Step 2: press

Step 3: review the result, and maybe amend the or if you know better! If we're unsure of the overall sentiment of the trial we will display the conclusion under the article title. We then require you to tell us what the correct sentiment is.

376 results for

Computer Printer

by
...
Latest & greatest
Alerts

Export results

Use check boxes to select individual results below

SmartSearch available

Trip's SmartSearch engine has discovered connected searches & results. Click to show

141. Ruth Bonnington: Thoughts on the NHS from a GP

, reviewing results, fighting the crashing computer system, and dictating letters that I get to at 18h30 and still have a few phone calls still to make. Then I’m grateful for my manager and staff who have sorted out the printer, sent off our paper work and evidence to NHS England or the CCG and prepared the protocols for a CQC inspection. And I’m grateful to my husband who may have started the stir fry and is not too irritated that I’m late again or that I didn’t get home from my half day till 17h30

2016 The BMJ Blog

142. Development of three-dimensional prints of arthritic joints for supporting patients’ awareness to structural damage (PubMed)

high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HR-pQCT) to develop 3D prototypes of patients' finger joints.HR-pQCT (XtremeCT, Scanco) measurements were performed in healthy individuals and patients with inflammatory joint disease, followed by a 3D print using the objet30 printer. Healthy participants (n = 10), and patients (n = 15 with RA and 15 with PsA) underwent a detailed, standardized interview with demonstration of printed joints.Utilizing HR-pQCT images of metacarpophalangeal

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2017 Arthritis research & therapy

143. 3D Printing of Biomolecular Models for Research and Pedagogy (PubMed)

3D Printing of Biomolecular Models for Research and Pedagogy The construction of physical three-dimensional (3D) models of biomolecules can uniquely contribute to the study of the structure-function relationship. 3D structures are most often perceived using the two-dimensional and exclusively visual medium of the computer screen. Converting digital 3D molecular data into real objects enables information to be perceived through an expanded range of human senses, including direct stereoscopic (...) parameters is difficult and time consuming without detailed guidance. Here, we provide a guide on the digital design and physical fabrication of biomolecule models for research and pedagogy using open source or low-cost software and low-cost 3D printers that use fused filament fabrication technology.

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2017 Journal of visualized experiments : JoVE

144. Intraoperative Change in Defect Size during Maxillary Reconstruction Using Surgical Guides Created by CAD/CAM (PubMed)

Intraoperative Change in Defect Size during Maxillary Reconstruction Using Surgical Guides Created by CAD/CAM Surgical osteotomy guides created by computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) have been developed and are now widely used in maxillofacial reconstruction. However, there are no standard procedures for dealing with an intraoperative change in defect size. We report on a case in which we used our CAD/CAM guides to deal with an intraoperative change in defect size (...) in a maxillary reconstruction. We planned the maxillary reconstruction using a free fibula flap because of left maxillary sinus cancer in a 73-year-old man. In Japan, we cannot use commercially supplied CAD/CAM guides because these have not been approved by the government. We created novel CAD/CAM guides by using free software and a low-cost 3D printer. We performed model surgery to check the accuracy of the design and to prebend the titanium plates before the operation. The actual defect in the maxilla

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2017 Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Global Open

145. Using a handheld stereo depth camera to overcome limited field-of-view in simulation imaging for radiation therapy treatment planning (PubMed)

Using a handheld stereo depth camera to overcome limited field-of-view in simulation imaging for radiation therapy treatment planning A correct body contour is essential for reliable treatment planning in radiation therapy. While modern medical imaging technologies provide highly accurate patient modeling, there are times when a patient's anatomy cannot be fully captured or there is a lack of easy access to computed tomography (CT) simulation. Here, we provide a practical solution (...) to merge the mesh model with the CT and fill in the missing surface information thereby obtaining a complete surface model of the subject. To evaluate the accuracy of the proposed approach, experiments were performed with the following steps. First, we selected three previously treated patients and fabricated a phantom mimicking each patient using the corresponding CT images and a 3D printer. Second, we removed part of the CT images of each patient to create hypothetical cases with image truncations

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2017 Medical physics

146. Early experiences of planning stereotactic radiosurgery using 3D printed models of eyes with uveal melanomas (PubMed)

Early experiences of planning stereotactic radiosurgery using 3D printed models of eyes with uveal melanomas The objective of this study was to determine the use of 3D printed model of an eye with intraocular tumor for linear accelerator-based stereotactic radiosurgery.The software for segmentation (3D Slicer) created virtual 3D model of eye globe with tumorous mass based on tissue density from computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging data. A virtual model was then processed (...) in the slicing software (Simplify3D®) and printed on 3D printer using fused deposition modeling technology. The material that was used for printing was polylactic acid.In 2015, stereotactic planning scheme was optimized with the help of 3D printed model of the patient's eye with intraocular tumor. In the period 2001-2015, a group of 150 patients with uveal melanoma (139 choroidal melanoma and 11 ciliary body melanoma) were treated. The median tumor volume was 0.5 cm3 (0.2-1.6 cm3). The radiation dose

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2017 Clinical ophthalmology (Auckland, N.Z.)

147. Cost-effective, personalized, 3D-printed liver model for preoperative planning before laparoscopic liver hemihepatectomy for colorectal cancer metastases (PubMed)

. This paper presents a cost-effective technique of preparing 3D-printed liver models that preserves the shape and all of the structures, including the vessels and the tumor, which in the present case is colorectal liver metastasis.The patient's computed tomography scans were used for the separation and visualization of virtual 3D anatomical structures. Those elements were transformed into stereolithographic files and subsequently printed on a desktop 3D printer. The multipart structure was assembled (...) Cost-effective, personalized, 3D-printed liver model for preoperative planning before laparoscopic liver hemihepatectomy for colorectal cancer metastases Three-dimensional (3D) printing for preoperative planning has been intensively developed in the recent years. However, the implementation of these solutions in hospitals is still difficult due to high costs, extremely expensive industrial-grade printers, and software that is difficult to obtain and learn along with a lack of a defined process

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2017 International journal of computer assisted radiology and surgery

148. 3D-printed phantom study for investigating stent abutment during gastroduodenal stent placement for gastric outlet obstruction (PubMed)

to design an in vitro experiment using a flexible anthropomorphic three-dimensional (3D)-printed GD phantom model.A GD phantom was fabricated using 3D printer data after performing computed tomography gastrography. A partially covered (PC) or fully covered (FC) stent was placed so that its distal end abutted onto the duodenal wall in groups PC-1 and FC-1 or its distal end was sufficiently directed caudally in groups PC-2 and FC-2. The elapsed times of the inflowing of three diets (liquid, soft

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2017 3D Printing in Medicine

149. Craniofacial Reconstruction by a Cost-Efficient Template-Based Process Using 3D Printing (PubMed)

of concept, we present a case of reconstruction of a craniofacial defect with involvement of the supraorbital rim. The following hybrid manufacturing process combines additive manufacturing with silicone molding and an intraoperative, manual fabrication process. A computer-aided design template is 3D printed from thermoplastics by a fused deposition modeling 3D printer and then silicone molded manually. After sterilization of the patient-specific mold, it is used intraoperatively to produce an implant

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2017 Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Global Open

150. How to run user testing, and what we learned from doing it on OpenPrescribing

team user research session. Exciting! 2. Get a team, and a room You’ll need: a quiet room, a phone line, wifi lots of wall space a whiteboard a printer, blu-tack, post-it notes in different colours, and pens. Next, you want someone with user research skills to run the sessions, and your team. Our sessions were led by the brilliant consultant : also on the team were me (tech lead), (community manager) and (developer). This might seem like a lot of people – and it was (probably too many when we (...) any questions for us! Also, it’s good to reassure the user at the start that you’re testing your design, not their computer skills! 6. Test, test, test Soon was time for the first session. It’s best to ask to record the call, or take detailed notes – that is so you can share raw observations, and refer back to exactly what the user said. We started with Henry running the calls, then switched roles. I found running the calls the hardest part! Here are some tips that Henry gave us: if the user goes

2016 CEBM blog

151. A low-cost surgical application of additive fabrication. (PubMed)

with computer software, translating the medical imaging data sets into useful 3D geometry files in stereo lithography format for 3D printing. A commercial third party was used to print the 3D models in laser sintered nylon, which provided access to expensive, industrial-grade, high-resolution 3-D printers at a low cost.Multiple patient-specific preoperative 3D physical models were printed of portal and hepatic venous anatomy at a cost of less than $100 per model.Current 3D printing techniques can be used (...) A low-cost surgical application of additive fabrication. This study was used to test the feasibility of using additive fabrication techniques 3-dimensional (3D) printing to create personalized/patient-specific hepatic 3D physical models from clinical radiology studies for surgical resident education.Patient-specific imaging data from either computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging scans, in Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine format, were rendered and manipulated

2017 Journal of Surgical Education

153. MAVARIC - a comparison of automation-assisted and manual cervical screening: a randomised controlled trial

. Project page URL INAHTA brief and checklist Indexing Status Subject indexing assigned by CRD MeSH Diagnosis, Computer-Assisteds; Mass Screening; Uterine Cervical Neoplasms Language Published English Country of organisation England Address for correspondence NETSCC, Health Technology Assessment, Alpha House, University of Southampton Science Park, Southampton, SO16 7NS UK Tel: +44 23 8059 5586 Email: hta@hta.ac.uk AccessionNumber 32010000272 Date abstract record published 14/04/2010 Health Technology (...) Assessment (HTA) database Copyright © 2011 Queen’s Printer and Controller of HMSO Homepage Options Print PubMed record Original research Share Message for HTA database users

2011 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.

154. Positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the assessment of axillary lymph node metastases in early breast cancer: systematic review and economic evaluation

emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the assessment of axillary lymph node metastases in early breast cancer: systematic review and economic evaluation. Health Technology Assessment 2011; 15(4): 1-134 Authors' objectives The objectives of this assessment were to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy, cost-effectiveness and effect on patient outcomes of positron emission tomography (PET), with or without computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI (...) Address for correspondence NETSCC, Health Technology Assessment, Alpha House, University of Southampton Science Park, Southampton, SO16 7NS UK Tel: +44 23 8059 5586 Email: hta@hta.ac.uk AccessionNumber 32010000253 Date abstract record published 14/04/2010 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) database Copyright © 2011 Queen’s Printer and Controller of HMSO Homepage Options Print PubMed record Original research Share Message for HTA database users

2011 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.

155. Guidelines for intensive care unit design

Guidelines for intensive care unit design Guidelines for intensive care unit design* : Critical Care Medicine You may be trying to access this site from a secured browser on the server. Please enable scripts and reload this page. Login No user account? Lippincott Journals Subscribers , use your username or email along with your password to log in. Remember me on this computer Register for a free account Registered users can save articles, searches, and manage email alerts. All registration (...) be mounted on these devices, allowing optimal positioning of all support devices, such as monitors, computers, communication devices, and intravenous (IV) pumps. The use of booms permits maximum flexibility in bed placement. Pendant-mounted boom configurations offer immediate and unrestricted access to the patient’s head during a crisis ( ), but may be confusing to the patient. Medical Gas, Vacuum, Data, and Electrical Outlets. Medical gas, vacuum, data, and electrical outlets need to be accessible from

2012 Society of Critical Care Medicine

156. Effectiveness of barcoding for reducing patient specimen and laboratory testing identification errors

with the accompanying challenges and solutions [ , – , , , ]. Key implementation components for making barcoding technology work as intended include adequate training and education, well-designed patient ID bands, and adequate supplies and equipment maintained in good working order (e.g., label printers, computers, batteries, wireless networks) [ ]. Shortages and performance issues were noted as problems frustrating staff that can result in using error-prone work around processes [ ]. Support and involvement from (...) , specimen collection, analysis and test result reporting[ ]. Barcode scanners are used to confirm patient identity. Other options include barcoded patient wristbands, portable printers to generate labels at the bedside, and use of an interface with a computerized physician order entry (CPOE) system. Point-of-Care Test Barcoding Systems Automated patient specimen and laboratory testing identification system use bar-coded patient identification and bar code scanners with a testing device at or close

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2012 Laboratory Medicine Best Practices

157. i STAT CG4+ and CHEM8+ cartridges for point-of-care testing in the emergency department

– data management software for cartridges, where test records can be transmitted to and then be printed or transmitted to the laboratory/hospital information system. i-STAT printer – an optional portable printer which enables the operator to print results at the point of care. This briefing report focuses on 2 i-STAT cartridges, the CG4+ and CHEM8+, which are most relevant to the NHS ED setting. The CG4+ cartridge provides the following chemistry test and blood gas measures: lactate pH i STAT CG4 (...) to the i-STAT Data Manager, a dedicated desktop computer with the i-STAT central data application installed. The data can be printed, stored, organised, edited and transferred to a laboratory information system or other computer system such as a hospital information system to aid patient record keeping. The manufacturer's instruction suggests that an electronic quality control check of the performance of each i-STAT analyser should be done once on each day of use, or as needed. This is carried out

2015 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Advice

158. Xpert GBS test for the intrapartum detection of group B streptococcus

GBS system consists of several essential components and optional accessories. List prices (excluding VAT) for the essential components are as follows: the GeneXpert molecular diagnostic system (1–16 modules) including computer system costs from £17,602 for a single-module system to £118,119 for a 16-module system the Xpert GBS cartridge costs £38.80 per single test sample collection device (transport container with dual swab) costs £37 per pack of 50. List prices for optional accessories (...) (excluding VAT) are: uninterruptible power supply for GeneXpert: £1,522 laser printer with USB cable: £110 GeneXpert 16-cartridge tray: £8 Xpert GBS test for the intrapartum detection of group B streptococcus (MIB28) © NICE 2018. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and- conditions#notice-of-rights). Page 7 of 30GeneXpert 32-cartridge tray: £12. Training is given by the manufacturer during installation and is free of charge. This includes training in sample

2015 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Advice

159. Infections Associated with Personal Service Establishments: Piercing and Tattooing

-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA- MRSA). All patients had received tattoos from 13 unlicensed tattoo artists over a two-year period in three U.S. states. Some patients reported observing lesions, consistent with MRSA infections, on the tattooists’ hands while others reported receiving tattoos in public places, such as parks or private residences; some tattoos were conducted with guitar-string needles and computer ink-jet printer cartridges. Interviews with 7 of the tattooists revealed poor adherence

2012 National Collaborating Centre for Environmental Health

160. Community Engagement as a Public Health Approach

to be involved. This may include helping them to develop knowledge and skills, including the ability to deal with discrimination and stigma (this could be an issue, for example, if someone has HIV). It may also involve dealing with practical issues such as the time they have available, their financial constraints, caring responsibilities or any difficulties they have with transport. i. Provide appropriate, accessible meeting spaces and equipment (such as telephones, computers and photocopying facilities

2012 Peel Health Library

To help you find the content you need quickly, you can filter your results via the categories on the right-hand side >>>>