How to Trip Rapid Review

Step 1: Select articles relevant to your search (remember the system is only optimised for single intervention studies)

Step 2: press

Step 3: review the result, and maybe amend the or if you know better! If we're unsure of the overall sentiment of the trial we will display the conclusion under the article title. We then require you to tell us what the correct sentiment is.

402 results for

Computer Printer

by
...
Latest & greatest
Alerts

Export results

Use check boxes to select individual results below

SmartSearch available

Trip's SmartSearch engine has discovered connected searches & results. Click to show

181. Wired Connection Interface

Connection Interface Aka: Wired Connection Interface From Related Chapters II. Types: Computer to device interfaces USB USB 3.1 transfer rates of 10 GBits/s USB 3 transfer rates of 5 GBits/s (900 mA charging) USB 2 transfer rates of 480 MBits/s (500 mA charging) Adapters: Type A (standard desktop), Type B (micro, mini), Type C (new, reversible) Computer USB ports can be disabled via group management in windows (enterprise security measure) Old, largely defunct Firewire (IEEE 1394) Transfer rates 400-800 (...) MBits/s (defunct, replaced by USB) PS/2 Old notched, round, 6-pin and 1 square peg, mouse and keyboard adapters replaced by USB Parallel Port (DB25) Old 25-pin printer interfaces replaced by USB Serial Port (DB9) Old 9-pin device adapter (still used for some - e.g. router configuration) III. Types: Ethernet Cable (RJ-45, Twisted-Pair Copper Cable) Twisted cables cancel each wires' electromagnetic radiation (causes interference in other wires) Available in shielded (in areas of high signal

2018 FP Notebook

182. Do I need a knee replacement?

principles – all geared to improve your quality of life. 7 comments on “ Do I need a knee replacement? ” I finally decided and I am going forward. I don’t have pain when sitting at a computer, but I am 81 years old, have had all the injections and fluid removals, did have an MRI and my doctor said “Arlene, I looked at your MRI and it wasn’t pretty. There is nothing more I can do for you except give you pain medication”. Well, I’m not having it until April, because of the holidays, plus I want to be able (...) to go outdoors and since I decided, now it seems to be worse. But, I am going to a doctor who is using the 3D printer and I think the procedure is called NAVIA – something like that, but I watched his seminar on it and also am going to have a consult with him in a couple of weeks, so I am finally confident about going forward. Thanks for all your posts, I enjoy reading them and was thinking of going with the arterial embolization, but now decided that it is just too late for that. So onward and hope

2018 Howard J. Luks, MD blog

183. It’s time to upgrade the outdated intake forms at health care clinics

eleven-page patient questionnaire with instructions to print and complete the form prior to my visit. Like many, I lacked immediate access to a printer. After showing up to my appointment without the form, I was expected to complete it in the clinic’s lobby. As a returning patient of this health system, most of the information asked was already available in the electronic health record (EHR). Did they really need to ask me about my city of birth again? What is already known in the EHR should populate (...) from any computer, tablet or phone, so that our patients can fill out this information in their own time and native language. The forms employ predictive follow up questions and synchronize with the EHR so that patients are prompted to complete only information that needs updating. Some of these companies even provide educational content to give patients context on the questions that they are being asked and the consents that they are signing. I have seen first hand how competitive the health care

2018 KevinMD blog

184. Will artificial intelligence ever replace doctors?

times ahead for the Airline Pilots Association. Making precision tools from 3D printers. Gourmet meals created with a voice-activated command. Theater and film productions starring faux actors created on keyboards. Will artificial intelligence invade the medical arena? The question is only how deeply it will invade. The role of the traditional physician is at risk of being marginalized as computer software hits the profession hard. Sure, computers cannot palpate an abdomen or perform a rectal exam (...) that sophisticated computer algorithms can synthesize an individual’s personal medical data and generate specific diagnoses, many of which might not have been considered by a human physician. Of course, there’s a lot more to being a decent physician than spitting out a list of diagnoses, as we doctors know despite when empowered patients bring us lists of diseases they think they have after spending some time in the Google School of Medicine. Although artificial intelligence is not a real doctor, it offers

2018 KevinMD blog

185. Jennifer Isherwood: A trainee’s perspective on delivering frontline care

incoming doctors • set a brief agenda at the start, ie, “We have admitted X number of patients. There are Y number still to be seen and I am concerned about Z number of patients. We will discuss each in more detail.” The latter two points rely on good team communication, informing a single, usually most junior, doctor about the required data to update the patient list. This will unlock a Pandora’s box of IT issues: finding a computer with connecting printer that works, having appropriate knowledge (...) doctors’ hospital lives is the computer system. Each doctor is armed with a plethora of logins, different for the fundamental IT programmes. The IT programmes used often differ between hospitals, which requires retraining and familiarisation every 6 to 12 months following the rotation of hospital sites. The processes for requesting investigations again change — some require discussion, some are on paper, others are all online. Assuming you can find a rare gem — otherwise known as an available computer

2017 The BMJ Blog

186. MAVARIC - a comparison of automation-assisted and manual cervical screening: a randomised controlled trial

. Project page URL INAHTA brief and checklist Indexing Status Subject indexing assigned by CRD MeSH Diagnosis, Computer-Assisteds; Mass Screening; Uterine Cervical Neoplasms Language Published English Country of organisation England Address for correspondence NETSCC, Health Technology Assessment, Alpha House, University of Southampton Science Park, Southampton, SO16 7NS UK Tel: +44 23 8059 5586 Email: hta@hta.ac.uk AccessionNumber 32010000272 Date abstract record published 14/04/2010 Health Technology (...) Assessment (HTA) database Copyright © 2011 Queen’s Printer and Controller of HMSO Homepage Options Print PubMed record Original research Share Message for HTA database users

2011 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.

187. Positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the assessment of axillary lymph node metastases in early breast cancer: systematic review and economic evaluation

emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the assessment of axillary lymph node metastases in early breast cancer: systematic review and economic evaluation. Health Technology Assessment 2011; 15(4): 1-134 Authors' objectives The objectives of this assessment were to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy, cost-effectiveness and effect on patient outcomes of positron emission tomography (PET), with or without computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI (...) Address for correspondence NETSCC, Health Technology Assessment, Alpha House, University of Southampton Science Park, Southampton, SO16 7NS UK Tel: +44 23 8059 5586 Email: hta@hta.ac.uk AccessionNumber 32010000253 Date abstract record published 14/04/2010 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) database Copyright © 2011 Queen’s Printer and Controller of HMSO Homepage Options Print PubMed record Original research Share Message for HTA database users

2011 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.

188. Wired Connection Interface

Connection Interface Aka: Wired Connection Interface From Related Chapters II. Types: Computer to device interfaces USB USB 3.1 transfer rates of 10 GBits/s USB 3 transfer rates of 5 GBits/s (900 mA charging) USB 2 transfer rates of 480 MBits/s (500 mA charging) Adapters: Type A (standard desktop), Type B (micro, mini), Type C (new, reversible) Computer USB ports can be disabled via group management in windows (enterprise security measure) Old, largely defunct Firewire (IEEE 1394) Transfer rates 400-800 (...) MBits/s (defunct, replaced by USB) PS/2 Old notched, round, 6-pin and 1 square peg, mouse and keyboard adapters replaced by USB Parallel Port (DB25) Old 25-pin printer interfaces replaced by USB Serial Port (DB9) Old 9-pin device adapter (still used for some - e.g. router configuration) III. Types: Ethernet Cable (RJ-45, Twisted-Pair Copper Cable) Twisted cables cancel each wires' electromagnetic radiation (causes interference in other wires) Available in shielded (in areas of high signal

2017 FP Notebook

189. Does Food Handler Training Improve Food Safety?

of sufficiently strong or moderate quality to include in this review. The review found insufficient research evidence that food handler training programs improve food safety practices among trained food handlers and limited evidence that it enhances knowledge or behaviour. Various methods of delivering training (live lecture, taped instruction, or computer system) are equally effective at enhancing knowledge. Mandatory training of managers, whose premises have been closed because of a threat to public health (...) training to be effective in enhancing food safety knowledge and behaviour among food handlers. Two of these three studies (Rinke et al., 1975; Waddell & Rinke, 1985) based their findings of improved knowledge by comparing pre-post test results from different training methods (live lecture, taped instruction, or computer system). Rinke conducted the training in a classroom setting with 60 food handlers employed in university residence halls. Waddell and Rinke held the training in a classroom with 230

2011 Peel Health Library

190. A medical student in therapy

this appointment for a month. In March, I started to take an online physiology exam for school but instead spent twenty minutes staring motionless at the computer screen. I eventually input the answers and passed the test, but I’d stopped caring. A week later, I had a panic attack while riding the 6 train through Midtown Manhattan at rush hour. I’d already been feeling trapped by the tightly scheduled lifestyle of a medical student, and getting sandwiched between strangers inside an underground tube (...) of concrete didn’t help. In late April, I scheduled an appointment with my school’s counseling program. An attending psychiatrist did my initial interview: She was warm, and we spoke for over an hour in her well-lit office before she referred me to Dr. Hassan, one of her residents. Dr. Hassan’s soft voice makes me aware of the silence surrounding us. I hear no coworkers rustling about outside her basement-office door, no printers whirring in the background. Her movements are slow and deliberate

2017 KevinMD blog

191. Three-dimensional assessment of the effects of high-density embolization material on the absorbed dose in the target for Gamma Knife radiosurgery of arteriovenous malformations. Full Text available with Trip Pro

hypothesized that this was partly caused by dosimetric deficiency. The actual dose delivered to the target may be smaller than the intended dose because of increased photon attenuation by high-density embolic materials. The authors performed a phantom-based study to quantitatively evaluate the 3D dosimetric effect of embolic material on GKRS. METHODS A 16-cm-diameter and 12-cm-long cylindrical phantom with a 16-cm-diameter hemispherical dome was printed by a 3D printer. The phantom was filled (...) treatment planning system (version 10.1.1). The plan was created to cover a fictitious AVM target volume near the embolization areas with eleven 8-mm shots and a prescription dose of 20 Gy to 50% isodose level. Dose distributions were computed using both tissue maximum ratio (TMR) 10 and convolution dose-calculation algorithms. These two 3D dose distributions were compared using an in-house program. Additionally, the same analysis method was applied to evaluate the dosimetric effects for 2 patients

2016 Journal of Neurosurgery

192. Semi-automated delineation of breast cancer tumors and subsequent materialization using three-dimensional printing (rapid prototyping). (Abstract)

methods-magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT), and 3D ultrasound-were used to capture 3D data for breast cancer tumors. The volumes of the breast tumors were calculated to assess the comparability of the breast tumor models, and the MRI information was used to render models on a commercially available 3D printer to materialize the tumors.The tumor volumes calculated from the different 3D methods appeared to be comparable. Tumor models with volumes between 325 mm3 (...) and 7,770 mm3 were printed and compared with the models rendered from MRI. The materialization of the tumors reflected the computer models of them.3D printing (rapid prototyping) appears to be feasible. Scenarios for the clinical use of the technology might include presenting the model to the surgeon to provide a better understanding of the tumor's spatial characteristics in the breast, in order to improve decision-making in relation to neoadjuvant chemotherapy or surgical approaches. J. Surg. Oncol

2016 Journal of Surgical Oncology

193. Three-dimensional printed final occlusal splint for orthognathic surgery: design and validation. (Abstract)

Three-dimensional printed final occlusal splint for orthognathic surgery: design and validation. Orthognathic surgery is indicated for the treatment of significant skeletal malocclusion and is normally prepared using conventional face bows combined with two-dimensional cephalometric analysis and manually made splints. With recent developments in oral imaging, more orthognathic surgeries are being planned using three-dimensional computer-aided design and manufacturing (3D CAD/CAM) software (...) . The purpose of this study was to present a protocol for the design and 3D printing of final digital occlusal splints based on 3D planning of orthognathic surgery and to validate the accuracy of these splints. The 3D virtual planning was performed in PROPLAN software (Materialise). The required data were then exported into 3-matic software (Materialise) to design the splints, which were 3D printed in biocompatible material using an Objet Connex 350 printer (Stratasys). To validate the accuracy

2016 International Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery

194. 3D-printed pediatric endoscopic ear surgery simulator for surgical training. (Abstract)

, fabricate, and test a low-cost and reusable 3D-printed TEES simulator.The TEES simulator was designed in computer-aided design (CAD) software using anatomic measurements taken from anthropometric studies. Cross sections from external auditory canal samples were traced as vectors and serially combined into a mesh construct. A modified tympanic cavity with a modular testing platform for simulator tasks was incorporated. Components were fabricated using calcium sulfate hemihydrate powder and multiple (...) is feasible for TEES simulation. Otolaryngology training programs with access to a 3D printer may readily fabricate a TEES simulator, resulting in inexpensive yet high-fidelity surgical simulation.Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

2016 International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology

195. Content Validity of Temporal Bone Models Printed Via Inexpensive Methods and Materials. (Abstract)

Content Validity of Temporal Bone Models Printed Via Inexpensive Methods and Materials. Computed tomographic (CT) scans of the 3-D printed temporal bone models will be within 15% accuracy of the CT scans of the cadaveric temporal bones.Previous studies have evaluated the face validity of 3-D-printed temporal bone models designed to train otolaryngology residents. The purpose of the study was to determine the content validity of temporal bone models printed using inexpensive printers (...) and materials.Four cadaveric temporal bones were randomly selected and clinical temporal bone CT scans were obtained. Models were generated using previously described methods in acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) plastic using the Makerbot Replicator 2× and Hyrel printers. Models were radiographically scanned using the same protocol as the cadaveric bones. Four images from each cadaveric CT series and four corresponding images from the model CT series were selected, and voxel values were normalized to black

2016 Otology and Neurotology

196. Assessment and Planning for a Pediatric Bilateral Hand Transplant Using 3-Dimensional Modeling: Case Report. (Abstract)

not be appropriate. We present an 8-year-old child evaluated for a bilateral hand transplant following bilateral amputation. The recipient forearms and model hands were modeled from computed tomography imaging studies and replicated as anatomic models with a 3-dimensional printer. We modified the scale of the printed hand to produce 3 proportions, 80%, 100% and 120%. The transplant team used the anatomical models during evaluation of a donor for appropriate match based on size. The donor's hand size matched

2016 Journal of Hand Surgery - American

197. Full 3-dimensional digital workflow for multicomponent dental appliances: A proof of concept. (Abstract)

process without the need for a physical model of the patient's dentition.Plaster models can be superfluous for orthodontic treatment as digital models can be used in all phases of a full digital workflow in orthodontics. The arduous task of making a multicomponent dental appliance that involves bending wires can possibly be replaced by a computer, design software, a 3D printer, and a bending robot.Copyright © 2016 American Dental Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. (...) Full 3-dimensional digital workflow for multicomponent dental appliances: A proof of concept. The authors used a 3-dimensional (3D) printer and a bending robot to produce a multicomponent dental appliance to assess whether 3D digital models of the dentition are applicable for a full digital workflow.The authors scanned a volunteer's dentition with an intraoral scanner (Lava Chairside Oral Scanner C.O.S., 3M). A digital impression was used to design 2 multicomponent orthodontic appliances

2016 Journal of the American Dental Association

198. 3D-printing and the effect on medical costs: a new era? (Abstract)

3D-printing and the effect on medical costs: a new era? 3D-printing (3DP) is the art and science of printing in a new dimension using 3D printers to transform 3D computer aided designs (CAD) into life-changing products. This includes the design of more effective and patient-friendly pharmaceutical products as well as bio-inspired medical devices. It is poised as the next technology revolution for the pharmaceutical and medical-device industries. After decorous implementation scientists

2016 Expert review of pharmacoeconomics & outcomes research

199. 3D Printing in the Laboratory: Maximize Time and Funds with Customized and Open-Source Labware Full Text available with Trip Pro

3D Printing in the Laboratory: Maximize Time and Funds with Customized and Open-Source Labware 3D printing, also known as additive manufacturing, is the computer-guided process of fabricating physical objects by depositing successive layers of material. It has transformed manufacturing across virtually every industry, bringing about incredible advances in research and medicine. The rapidly growing consumer market now includes convenient and affordable "desktop" 3D printers. These are being used (...) several years, 3D printers could be commonplace within the home; with so many practical uses for 3D printing, we anticipate that the technology will also play an increasingly important role in the laboratory. © 2016 Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening.

2016 Journal of laboratory automation

200. 3D Printed Dry EEG Electrodes Full Text available with Trip Pro

3D Printed Dry EEG Electrodes Electroencephalography (EEG) is a procedure that records brain activity in a non-invasive manner. The cost and size of EEG devices has decreased in recent years, facilitating a growing interest in wearable EEG that can be used out-of-the-lab for a wide range of applications, from epilepsy diagnosis, to stroke rehabilitation, to Brain-Computer Interfaces (BCI). A major obstacle for these emerging applications is the wet electrodes, which are used as part of the EEG (...) setup. These electrodes are attached to the human scalp using a conductive gel, which can be uncomfortable to the subject, causes skin irritation, and some gels have poor long-term stability. A solution to this problem is to use dry electrodes, which do not require conductive gel, but tend to have a higher noise floor. This paper presents a novel methodology for the design and manufacture of such dry electrodes. We manufacture the electrodes using low cost desktop 3D printers and off-the-shelf

2016 Sensors (Basel, Switzerland)

To help you find the content you need quickly, you can filter your results via the categories on the right-hand side >>>>