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Common Pediatric Skin Rashes

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1. Common Pediatric Skin Rashes

Common Pediatric Skin Rashes Aka: Common Pediatric Skin Rashes II. Causes: Common Systemic Conditions ( ) Presents with high fever without significant focal findings, in a child who appears well Develops maculopapular central rash on trunk as the fever abates around day 4-5 Onset with a herald patch (2-10 cm rose red border with fine scale and central clearing) Evolves with numerous small similar lesions, bilaterally symmetric in a christmas tree pattern associated rash with fine sandpaper-like s (...) Common Pediatric Skin Rashes Common Pediatric Skin Rashes Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Common Pediatric Skin Rashes

2018 FP Notebook

2. Assessment of maculopapular rash

, and the term may be misused to indicate any rash. The term 'rash' is also non-specific and is sometimes incorrectly applied to any skin finding; eruption may be preferred for a cutaneous reaction of acute onset. However, the term 'maculopapular rash' is in common clinical use and will be retained here for simplicity. Synonyms for maculopapular rash include exanthematous eruption (exanthem) and morbilliform eruption. Definitions The term maculopapular rash typically implies an acute and generalised eruption (...) serous fluid Bulla: a larger vesicle >1 cm Urticaria: a wheal or hive. The term maculopapular rash, therefore, implies a skin eruption of flat and raised lesions. Differentials Allergy to food or drug Insect bites or stings Adverse drug reaction to, e.g., antibiotic, anticonvulsant, or allopurinol Chemotherapy Enterovirus and echovirus infection Fifth disease (erythema infectiosum) Roseola infantum (sixth disease) Epstein Barr virus (EBV) infection (infectious mononucleosis) Cytomegalovirus (CMV

2019 BMJ Best Practice

3. Reliability and accuracy of smartphones for paediatric infectious disease consultations for children with rash in the paediatric emergency department. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Reliability and accuracy of smartphones for paediatric infectious disease consultations for children with rash in the paediatric emergency department. Smartphones and associated messaging applications have become the most common means of communication among health care workers and the general population. The aim of this study was to evaluate the reliability and accuracy of smartphones for the diagnosis of rash in children admitted to emergency departments during the night shift.The images (...) of the children who were admitted to the paediatric emergency department with rash were included in this study, and at least two images taken with smartphones by residents or paediatric infectious disease fellows were re-directed to the chief consultant of the Paediatric-Infectious Department via smartphone. Initial diagnosis by the consultant was recorded, and the patient's physical examination was performed by another clinician on the first working day; diagnostic tests were planned by this clinician

2019 BMC Pediatrics

4. Nappy rash

Nappy rash Nappy rash - Symptoms, diagnosis and treatment | BMJ Best Practice You'll need a subscription to access all of BMJ Best Practice Search  Nappy rash Last reviewed: February 2019 Last updated: September 2018 Summary Nappy rash is primarily an irritant contact dermatitis. It is most common in the first 2 years of life, but can occur in a person of any age who routinely wears nappies. Diagnosis is made by characteristic skin findings in the area of the body covered by a nappy; erythema (...) of the convex surfaces of the buttocks is the classic finding. Initial treatment involves reinforcing good nappy change practices, such as frequent nappy changes, use of super-absorbent disposable nappies, periods of nappy-free time, and application of barrier cream, ointment, or paste. Recalcitrant nappy rash may signal secondary infection or underlying systemic or dermatological disorders and requires further evaluation. Definition Nappy rash is inflammation of the skin in the area of the body covered

2018 BMJ Best Practice

5. Assessment of maculopapular rash

, and the term may be misused to indicate any rash. The term 'rash' is also non-specific and is sometimes incorrectly applied to any skin finding; eruption may be preferred for a cutaneous reaction of acute onset. However, the term 'maculopapular rash' is in common clinical use and will be retained here for simplicity. Synonyms for maculopapular rash include exanthematous eruption (exanthem) and morbilliform eruption. Definitions The term maculopapular rash typically implies an acute and generalised eruption (...) serous fluid Bulla: a larger vesicle >1 cm Urticaria: a wheal or hive. The term maculopapular rash, therefore, implies a skin eruption of flat and raised lesions. Differentials Allergy to food or drug Insect bites or stings Adverse drug reaction to, e.g., antibiotic, anticonvulsant, or allopurinol Chemotherapy Enterovirus and echovirus infection Fifth disease (erythema infectiosum) Roseola infantum (sixth disease) Epstein Barr virus (EBV) infection (infectious mononucleosis) Cytomegalovirus (CMV

2018 BMJ Best Practice

6. Nappy rash

Nappy rash Nappy rash - Symptoms, diagnosis and treatment | BMJ Best Practice You'll need a subscription to access all of BMJ Best Practice Search  Nappy rash Last reviewed: February 2019 Last updated: September 2018 Summary Nappy rash is primarily an irritant contact dermatitis. It is most common in the first 2 years of life, but can occur in a person of any age who routinely wears nappies. Diagnosis is made by characteristic skin findings in the area of the body covered by a nappy; erythema (...) of the convex surfaces of the buttocks is the classic finding. Initial treatment involves reinforcing good nappy change practices, such as frequent nappy changes, use of super-absorbent disposable nappies, periods of nappy-free time, and application of barrier cream, ointment, or paste. Recalcitrant nappy rash may signal secondary infection or underlying systemic or dermatological disorders and requires further evaluation. Definition Nappy rash is inflammation of the skin in the area of the body covered

2017 BMJ Best Practice

7. Evaluation of the Safety and Performance of LiNiDERM® in the Prevention of Infant Diaper Rash

maintain the epidermal skin barrier in the diaper region, good hygiene and adequate protection are necessary to prevent skin barrier breakdown, rash and infection. The prevention of IDD includes frequent diaper changing, parent education and cleaning. LiNiRASH is a monocentric, prospective, randomized, comparator controlled study conducted under paediatric control. 132 infants will be followed in this study for 4 weeks during which their parents will use a specific cleaning method: water and cotton (...) dermatitis of the diaper area infants. This dermatitis is very common amongst first year of life. The IDD is characterized by erythema on the convex surfaces with the skin folds spared (W-shaped erythema) and it can cause considerable pain and stress for infants and can be troublesome for their caregivers. The development of IDD is multifactorial. The critical step in the development of IDD is the occlusion of the skin under the diaper. The skin in the diaper area is predisposed to irritation

2018 Clinical Trials

8. Severe Infant Rash Resistant to Therapy Due to Zinc Deficiency: A Case Report. (Abstract)

Severe Infant Rash Resistant to Therapy Due to Zinc Deficiency: A Case Report. Pediatric skin diseases are a common presenting complaint to emergency medicine physicians but often pose a significant diagnostic challenge. Skin eruptions that are unusually severe for the diagnosis in question, lasting beyond the typical time of resolution, or not responding to conventional therapy should raise concern of a misdiagnosis. We present the case of a severe rash not responding to conventional atopic (...) dermatitis therapy that led to a diagnosis of transient neonatal zinc deficiency. Clinicians caring for children should be aware of zinc deficiency and its corresponding clinical presentation, because it is readily treatable and may lead to the avoidance of unnecessary treatments and prevention of serious complications.

2017 Pediatric Emergency Care

9. Nappy rash

such as Staphylococcus aureus and streptococci. It is estimated that nappy rash affects up to 25% of nappy-wearing infants at any given time. Risk factors include the skin cleaning regime, type of nappy, use of baby wipes and other topical preparations, and recent diarrhoea or antibiotic use. A diagnosis of nappy rash should be suspected if there are typical clinical features: The child may appear distressed, agitated, or uncomfortable, as the rash may be itchy and painful. Well-defined areas of confluent erythema (...) and scattered papules over convex surfaces in contact with the nappy (the buttocks, genitalia, suprapubic area, and upper thighs), with sparing of the inguinal skin creases and gluteal cleft. There may be skin erosions, oedema, and ulceration if there is severe involvement. Assessment of a child with suspected nappy rash should include: Asking about the location, nature, and duration of rash; any previous episodes; and any treatments, such as barrier preparations. Examining for oral candidiasis and features

2018 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

10. Childhood Arthritis and Rheumatology Research Alliance Consensus Clinical Treatment Plans for Juvenile Dermatomyositis with Persistent Skin Rash. (Abstract)

Childhood Arthritis and Rheumatology Research Alliance Consensus Clinical Treatment Plans for Juvenile Dermatomyositis with Persistent Skin Rash. Juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM) is the most common form of idiopathic inflammatory myopathy in children. While outcomes are generally thought to be good, persistence of skin rash is a common problem. The goal of this study was to describe the development of clinical treatment plans (CTP) for children with JDM characterized by persistent skin rash (...) despite complete resolution of muscle involvement.The Childhood Arthritis and Rheumatology Research Alliance, a North American consortium of pediatric rheumatologists and other healthcare providers, used a combination of Delphi surveys and nominal group consensus meetings to develop CTP that reflected consensus on typical treatments for patients with JDM with persistent skin rash.Consensus was reached on patient characteristics and outcome assessment. Patients should have previously received

2016 Journal of Rheumatology

11. Common Pediatric Skin Rashes

Common Pediatric Skin Rashes Aka: Common Pediatric Skin Rashes II. Causes: Common Systemic Conditions ( ) Presents with high fever without significant focal findings, in a child who appears well Develops maculopapular central rash on trunk as the fever abates around day 4-5 Onset with a herald patch (2-10 cm rose red border with fine scale and central clearing) Evolves with numerous small similar lesions, bilaterally symmetric in a christmas tree pattern associated rash with fine sandpaper-like s (...) Common Pediatric Skin Rashes Common Pediatric Skin Rashes Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Common Pediatric Skin Rashes

2015 FP Notebook

12. Comparison of the Effectiveness of New Material Diapers versus Standard Diapers for the Prevention of Diaper Rash in Chinese Babies: A Double-Blinded, Randomized, Controlled, Cross-Over Study Full Text available with Trip Pro

Comparison of the Effectiveness of New Material Diapers versus Standard Diapers for the Prevention of Diaper Rash in Chinese Babies: A Double-Blinded, Randomized, Controlled, Cross-Over Study Diaper rash, also known as diaper dermatitis (DD), is a very common skin condition in infants, and use of disposable diapers with breathable materials is an effective approach for the management of diaper rash. In China, new material diapers and standard diapers are currently the two most commonly used (...) disposable diapers. This study aimed to compare the effectiveness of new material diapers versus standard diaper for the prevention of diaper rash in Chinese babies.A total of 80 eligible babies admitted to Shanghai Skin Diseases Hospital during the period from June through July, 2016, were enrolled and randomized into two groups. Babies in Group A (n = 41) used the new material diapers, and babies in Group B (n = 39) used standard diapers. Two weeks after the use of the diaper, the babies used

2018 BioMed research international Controlled trial quality: uncertain

13. Oral challenge without skin testing in children with suspected non-severe betalactam hypersensitivity. (Abstract)

Oral challenge without skin testing in children with suspected non-severe betalactam hypersensitivity. Suspected allergy to betalactam is common in children. However, the risk of anaphylaxis and fatal anaphylaxis is low, estimated at 0.015%-0.004% and 0.0015-0.002% of treated patients, respectively (1, 2). Up to recently, a provocation challenge was recommended in children with a suspected betalactam hypersensitivity (BH) and negative skin tests. However, these tests are painful, time-consuming (...) , require skilled team, appropriate setting and their role has been debated. In a study of Caubet et al., both skin tests and oral challenge test (OCT) were performed in 88 children with a history of mild non-immediate reactions with a betalactam antibiotic: 11 had an immediate positive intradermal test, but only 4 of them had a mild exanthema when challenged (3). In vitro and patch tests do not help for the diagnosis of these suspected drug reactions. This article is protected by copyright. All rights

2019 Pediatric Allergy and Immunology

14. Antifungal agents for common paediatric infections

The Canadian Paediatric Society gives permission to print single copies of this document from our website. For permission to reprint or reproduce multiple copies, please see our . Principal author(s) Robert Bortolussi, Susanna Martin; Canadian Paediatric Society, Paediatr Child Health 2007;12(10):875-878 The most common fungal infections in infants and children are mucocutaneous candidiasis, pityriasis versicolor, tinea corporis, tinea pedis and tinea capitis . The objective of the present update (...) , Public Health Agency of Canada Consultant: Noni E MacDonald MD Principal authors: Robert Bortolussi MD; Susanna Martin MD References Gupta AK, Cooper EA, Ryder JE, Nicol KA, Chow M, Chaudhry MM. Optimal management of fungal infections of the skin, hair, and nails. Am J Clin Dermatol 2004;5:225-37. Canadian Paediatric Society, Infectious Diseases and Immunization Committee [Principal Author: B. Bortolussi]. Antifungal agents for common paediatric infections. Paediatr Child Health 2007: (10)875-83

2012 Canadian Paediatric Society

15. Paediatric European Network for Treatment of AIDS (PENTA) guidelines for treatment of paediatric HIV-1 infection 2015: optimizing health in preparation for adult life

Institute of Child Health, University College London, London, UK, 5 Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegan, The Netherlands, 6 University Department of Immunology and Infectious Disease, Bambino Gesù Children’s Hospital, Rome, Italy, 7 Our Lady’s Children’s Hospital Crumlin & University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland, 8 Meyer University Hospital, Florence University, Florence, Italy, 9 HIV i-Base, London, UK, 10 Emilio Ribas Institute of Infectious Diseases, Sao Paulo, Brazil, 11 Paediatric (...) , Pediatric Department, Porto Central Hospital, Porto, Portugal, 18 Department of Clinical Microbiology and Virology, University College London Hospitals, London, UK, 19 Centre for Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine, HELIOS Hospital Krefeld, Krefeld, Germany, 20 Infectious Diseases Unit, Pediatrics Department, Sant Joan de Déu Hospital, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain, 21 12th of October Hospital, Madrid, Spain, 22 University Children’s Hospital, Basel, Switzerland, 23 Department of Paediatric

2018 The Children's HIV Association

16. Common hereditary lysosomal storage diseases

index of suspicion, and is easily made by biochemical test or mutational analysis. Tissue biopsy is rarely required to make the diagnosis. Many present in early childhood with hepatosplenomegaly, neurodevelopmental delay, cardiorespiratory disease, joint contractures, and failure to thrive. Others present later in childhood with pain, organ enlargement, skin rash, sensory organ damage, musculoskeletal abnormalities, muscle weakness, and neurodevelopmental delay. Early referral to a specialist centre (...) , Fabry's, Niemann-Pick type A) onset in adolescence (Fabry's, Pompe's, Gaucher's types 1, 3, MPS, Niemann-Pick types B, C) onset in adulthood (Fabry's, Gaucher's type 1, Pompe's) hepatomegaly and/or splenomegaly hyperacusis history of renal failure skin rash/cutaneous lesions large head circumference macular 'cherry red spot' on ophthalmoscopy optic atrophy or retinitis pigmentosa on ophthalmoscopy corneal clouding on ophthalmoscopy fatigue neurodevelopmental delay hearing impairment/sudden deafness

2019 BMJ Best Practice

17. Common hereditary lysosomal storage diseases

index of suspicion, and is easily made by biochemical test or mutational analysis. Tissue biopsy is rarely required to make the diagnosis. Many present in early childhood with hepatosplenomegaly, neurodevelopmental delay, cardiorespiratory disease, joint contractures, and failure to thrive. Others present later in childhood with pain, organ enlargement, skin rash, sensory organ damage, musculoskeletal abnormalities, muscle weakness, and neurodevelopmental delay. Early referral to a specialist centre (...) , Fabry's, Niemann-Pick type A) onset in adolescence (Fabry's, Pompe's, Gaucher's types 1, 3, MPS, Niemann-Pick types B, C) onset in adulthood (Fabry's, Gaucher's type 1, Pompe's) hepatomegaly and/or splenomegaly hyperacusis history of renal failure skin rash/cutaneous lesions large head circumference macular 'cherry red spot' on ophthalmoscopy optic atrophy or retinitis pigmentosa on ophthalmoscopy corneal clouding on ophthalmoscopy fatigue neurodevelopmental delay hearing impairment/sudden deafness

2018 BMJ Best Practice

18. Generalized Rash

Generalized Rash Generalized Rash Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Generalized Rash Generalized Rash Aka: Generalized (...) Rash , Diffuse Dermatitis II. Causes: Common tous Conditions Nummular Exczema s and patches or Local, systemic, or environmental reactions Drug Eruption s ( ) s s ( ) Varicella ( ) III. Causes: Uncommon (but serious) Vesicular or Bullous Stephens-Johnson Syndrome ( ) Infectious Causes or withn rash Miscellaneous Causes ( ) IV. Causes: Rare Pityriasis lichenoides Pityriasis rubra pilaris lpox V. History: Distinctive Findings Nummular s Varicella Palm and Sole Involvement (See or ) Secondary

2018 FP Notebook

19. Life-Threatening Drug-Induced Rashes

Life-Threatening Drug-Induced Rashes Life-Threatening Drug-Induced Rashes Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Life (...) -Threatening Drug-Induced Rashes Life-Threatening Drug-Induced Rashes Aka: Life-Threatening Drug-Induced Rashes , Acute Life-threatening Hypersensitivity Skin Reaction From Related Chapters II. Causes: ABCDS Mnemonic See ( ) Non-follicular s at the flexor surfaces Within 4 days of beta lactam, or exposure Associated fever, and e insidious onset with s, beta-lactam antibiotics, s, , or ACE-Inhibitor induced ( ) Presentation similar to ( form rash) presentation, but >2 weeks after exposure Anticonvulsants

2018 FP Notebook

20. Covid-19: Providing virtual care during a pandemic, a guide to telemedicine in the paediatric office

if pharynx is red or if there is any exudate. Kids can have lots of rashes, whether they are viral-induced, eczema or a drug reaction; these can be seen on video too. Who to still see in person in your clinic , because any delay or omission in scheduled vaccines puts children at risk for common and serious childhood infections such as pneumococcal disease, measles, and pertussis. Reserving times for this group may be a priority. Maintaining accurate, up-to-date health records and ensuring follow-up (...) Covid-19: Providing virtual care during a pandemic, a guide to telemedicine in the paediatric office Providing virtual care during a pandemic: A guide to telemedicine in the paediatric office | Canadian Paediatric Society A home for paediatricians. A voice for children and youth. Current: Providing virtual care during a pandemic: A guide to telemedicine in the… Providing virtual care during a pandemic: A guide to telemedicine in the paediatric office Posted on Mar 26 2020 by the Canadian

2020 Canadian Paediatric Society

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