How to Trip Rapid Review

Step 1: Select articles relevant to your search (remember the system is only optimised for single intervention studies)

Step 2: press

Step 3: review the result, and maybe amend the or if you know better! If we're unsure of the overall sentiment of the trial we will display the conclusion under the article title. We then require you to tell us what the correct sentiment is.

3,341 results for

Coma Exam

by
...
Latest & greatest
Alerts

Export results

Use check boxes to select individual results below

SmartSearch available

Trip's SmartSearch engine has discovered connected searches & results. Click to show

101. Longitudinal Study of the Default-mode Network Connectivity in Brain Injured Patients Recovering From Coma

. The investigators hypothesized that DMN connectivity strength would be related to the level of consciousness of brain-damaged patients. The investigators will follow severely brain-injured patient in coma. Clinical examination using standardized behavioural scales: FOUR score (Full Outline of UnResponsivess), Coma Recovery Scale-Revised); and brain imaging assessesments using MRI (functional and anatomical connectivity, cortical thickness) will be performed at: 3 to 30 (visit 1), and 60 (visit 2) days after (...) Longitudinal Study of the Default-mode Network Connectivity in Brain Injured Patients Recovering From Coma Longitudinal Study of the Default-mode Network Connectivity in Brain Injured Patients Recovering From Coma - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100

2012 Clinical Trials

102. Preliminary framework for Familiar Auditory Sensory Training (FAST) provided during coma recovery. (Abstract)

Preliminary framework for Familiar Auditory Sensory Training (FAST) provided during coma recovery. Since there remains a need to examine the nature of the neural effect and therapeutic efficacy/effectiveness of sensory stimulation provided to persons in states of seriously impaired consciousness, a passive sensory stimulation intervention, referred to as the Familiar Auditory Sensory Training (FAST) protocol, was developed for examination in an ongoing, double-blind, randomized clinical trial (...) . The potential effect of the intervention is illustrated using functional brain imaging of nondisabled subjects. This illustration also demonstrates the relevance of the rationale for designing the FAST protocol. To put the intervention within the context of the scientific development process, the article culminates with a description of the study design for the ongoing RCT examining the efficacy of the FAST protocol.

2012 Journal of rehabilitation research and development Controlled trial quality: uncertain

103. Amyloid β-Related Angiitis Causing Coma Responsive to Immunosuppression Full Text available with Trip Pro

Amyloid β-Related Angiitis Causing Coma Responsive to Immunosuppression Introduction. Amyloid-beta-related angiitis (ABRA) is a form of CNS vasculitis in which perivascular beta-amyloid in the intracerebral vessels is thought to act as a trigger for inflammation mediated by CD68+ macrophages and CD3+ T lymphocytes. Patients with severe ABRA may develop coma responsive to immunosuppressive treatment. Case Presentation. A 57-year-old man presented to the neurological intensive care unit febrile (...) , obtunded, and with a left hemiparesis. He had suffered from intermittent left arm weakness and numbness for several months prior. Serum and cerebrospinal fluid studies showed a lymphocytic leukocytosis in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), but no other evidence of infection, and the patient underwent a brain biopsy. Histopathological examination demonstrated amyloid angiopathy, with an extensive perivascular lymphocytic infiltrate, indicative of ABRA. The patient was started on cyclophosphamide

2012 Case Reports in Pathology

104. Metabolic vs structural coma in the ED-an observational study. (Abstract)

Metabolic vs structural coma in the ED-an observational study. Patients presenting unconscious may reasonably be categorized as suffering from a metabolic or structural condition.The objective was to investigate if some routinely recorded clinical features may help to distinguish between these 2 main forms of coma in the emergency department (ED).Adults admitted to an ED in Stockholm between February 2003 and May 2005 with a Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score less than 11 were enrolled (...) prospectively. The GCS score was entered into a protocol that was complemented with available data within 1 month.The study population of 875 patients was classified into 2 main groups: one with a metabolic (n = 633; 72%) and one with a structural disorder (n = 242; 28%). Among the clinical features recorded in the ED, 3 were found to be strongly associated with a metabolic disorder, namely, young age, low or normal blood pressure, and absence of focal signs in the neurological examination. Patients younger

2012 American Journal of Emergency Medicine

105. A multicenter prospective study of interobserver agreement using the Full Outline of Unresponsiveness score coma scale in the intensive care unit. (Abstract)

A multicenter prospective study of interobserver agreement using the Full Outline of Unresponsiveness score coma scale in the intensive care unit. The classification of the comatose patient has been greatly improved with the use of coma scales. The Full Outline of Unresponsiveness score has emerged as an alternative to the Glasgow Coma Scale in that it incorporates essential information needed to assess the depth of coma. One set of patients for which the Full Outline of Unresponsiveness score (...) could be particularly beneficial is those admitted to an intensive care unit, where approximately 30%-35% of all patients are intubated or ventilated. This manuscript reports on a study that examined the inter-rater reliability of the Full Outline of Unresponsiveness score in five intensive care units.Seven intensive care units at five U.S. hospitals partici-pated.Patients admitted during parts of 2010 and 2011 had their Full Outline of Unresponsiveness score assessed independently by two nurses

2012 Critical Care Medicine

106. Prognosis of coma after therapeutic hypothermia: A prospective cohort study. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Prognosis of coma after therapeutic hypothermia: A prospective cohort study. This study was designed to establish the reliability of neurologic examination, neuron-specific enolase (NSE), and median nerve somatosensory-evoked potentials (SEPs) to predict poor outcome in patients treated with mild hypothermia after cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR).This multicenter prospective cohort study included adult comatose patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) after CPR and treated (...) months.Of 391 patients included, 53% had a poor outcome. Absent pupillary light responses (FPR 1; 95% CI, 0-7) or absent corneal reflexes (FPR 4; 95% CI, 1-13) 72 hours after CPR, and absent SEPs during hypothermia (FPR 3; 95% CI, 1-7) and after rewarming (FPR 0; 95% CI, 0-18) were reliable predictors. Motor scores 72 hours after CPR (FPR 10; 95% CI, 6-16) and NSE levels were not.In patients with persisting coma after CPR and therapeutic hypothermia, use of motor score or NSE, as recommended in current

2012 Annals of Neurology

107. Examination of the unconscious patient. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Examination of the unconscious patient. 5008352 1972 03 28 2008 11 20 0007-1447 1 5791 1972 Jan 01 British medical journal Br Med J Examination of the unconscious patient. 49 Plum F F eng Journal Article England Br Med J 0372673 0007-1447 AIM IM Brain metabolism Coma diagnosis Humans Respiration Unconsciousness diagnosis etiology metabolism 1972 1 1 1972 1 1 0 1 1972 1 1 0 0 ppublish 5008352 PMC1789097

1972 British medical journal

108. Metabolic coma. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Metabolic coma. 4544356 1974 04 17 2013 11 21 0093-0415 120 2 1974 Feb The Western journal of medicine West. J. Med. Metabolic coma. 131-42 Scott R T RT eng Journal Article United States West J Med 0410504 0093-0415 6EIM3851UZ Ethchlorvynol IM S Adult Coma chemically induced classification diagnosis physiopathology Diagnosis, Differential Ethchlorvynol poisoning Eye Movements Humans Male Medical History Taking Neurologic Examination Physical Examination Pupil Vestibule, Labyrinth

1974 Western Journal of Medicine

109. Value of emergency toxicological investigations in differential diagnosis of coma. Full Text available with Trip Pro

barbiturates were the drugs most commonly encountered in the severe cases. Toxicological investigations should be considered in the differential diagnosis of coma when history, physical examination, and emergency biochemical measurements yield little diagnostic information. (...) Value of emergency toxicological investigations in differential diagnosis of coma. Out of 208 cases of coma of unknown aetiology referred to the poisons unit of this hospital during 1978 for emergency toxicological investigations, 108 were found to be due to self-poisoning medical conditions, mainly neurological, accounted for coma in 90 patients; the cause was not ascertained in the remaining 10 cases. More than one preparation had been ingested by 58 (54%) of the poisoned patients, although

1979 British medical journal

110. Observer variability in assessing impaired consciousness and coma. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Observer variability in assessing impaired consciousness and coma. Head-injured patients were examined by a number of observers whose assessments were compared. Considerable discrepancies occurred when overall "levels" of consciousness and coma were used, and also with some terms which are in common use. More consistent assessments were obtained by employing the "Glasgow Coma Scale," which describes eye opening, verbal behaviour, and motor responsiveness. Nurses and general surgeons were

1978 Journal of neurology, neurosurgery, and psychiatry

111. Early metabolic acidosis and coma in massive acetaminophen overdose

Early metabolic acidosis and coma in massive acetaminophen overdose Early metabolic acidosis and coma in massive acetaminophen overdose » The Poison Review Early metabolic acidosis and coma in massive acetaminophen overdose August 7, 2015, 1:33 pm Coma and Severe Acidosis: Remember to Consider Acetaminophen. Villano JH et al. J Med Toxicol 2015 July 8 [Epub ahead of print] This paper, from UC-San Diego, contains an excellent case discussion that makes numerous important points about a patient (...) who presents with decreased mental status and . The patient was a 28-year-old male who was brought to the emergency department because he was found to be unresponsive in his jail cell 16 hours after being arrested for murder. Initial evaluation revealed tachycardia (111/min,) mild hypothermia (95.5 o F,) and a depressed level of consciousness with non-focal neurological examination. Blood glucose was 362 mg/dL. Tests results included arterial pH 6.97, pCO 2 40 mmHg, serum bicarbonate 7 mEq/L

2015 The Poison Review blog

112. FOUR score and Glasgow Coma Scale in predicting outcome of comatose patients: a pooled analysis (Abstract)

Journal Article Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't 2011 05 11 United States Neurology 0401060 0028-3878 AIM IM Adult Aged Aged, 80 and over Area Under Curve Cohort Studies Coma diagnosis physiopathology Comprehension Eye Movements Female Glasgow Coma Scale Humans Male Middle Aged Physical Examination methods Predictive Value of Tests Prognosis ROC Curve Reflex Respiration 2011 5 13 6 0 2011 5 13 6 0 2011 9 3 6 0 ppublish 21562252 WNL.0b013e318220ac06 10.1212/WNL.0b013e318220ac06 (...) FOUR score and Glasgow Coma Scale in predicting outcome of comatose patients: a pooled analysis 21562252 2011 09 02 2011 07 05 1526-632X 77 1 2011 Jul 05 Neurology Neurology FOUR score and Glasgow Coma Scale in predicting outcome of comatose patients: a pooled analysis. 84-5 10.1212/WNL.0b013e318220ac06 Wijdicks Eelco F M EF Department of Neurology, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street SW, Rochester, MN 55905, USA. wijde@mayo.edu Rabinstein Alejandro A AA Bamlet William R WR Mandrekar Jay N JN eng

2011 EvidenceUpdates

113. The Glasgow Coma Scale: its reliability, validity, predictive value and responsiveness. A living systematic review

The Glasgow Coma Scale: its reliability, validity, predictive value and responsiveness. A living systematic review Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external websites. Email salutation (e.g. "Dr Smith" or "Joanne") for correspondence (...) the number of studies per subgroup required for analysis should be specified. For further guidance please refer to the and to pre-clinical meta-analysis. Example: The following study characteristics will be examined as potential source of heterogeneity: species (stratified per species); sex (stratified per sex); duration of index ischemia (linear); stem cell dose (linear); blinding of outcome assessment reported (stratified yes vs no). For stratified analyses, a minimum number of 8 studies per subgroup

2014 PROSPERO

114. Overview of Coma and Impaired Consciousness

the American... 3D Model Herniated Nucleus Pulposus Video How to do a 4-Minute Neurologic Exam SOCIAL MEDIA Add to Any Platform Loading , MD, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Click here for Patient Education NOTE: This is the Professional Version. CONSUMERS: Topic Resources Coma is unresponsiveness from which the patient cannot be aroused. Impaired consciousness refers to similar, less severe disturbances of consciousness; these disturbances are not considered coma. The mechanism for coma (...) whether the brain stem is intact and where the lesion is located within the CNS. The examination focuses on the following: Level of consciousness Eyes Motor function Deep tendon reflexes Level of consciousness is evaluated by attempting to wake patients first with verbal commands, then with nonnoxious stimuli, and finally with noxious stimuli (eg, pressure to the supraorbital ridge, nail bed, or sternum). The Glasgow Coma Scale (see Table: ) was developed to assess patients with head trauma. For head

2013 Merck Manual (19th Edition)

115. The value of clinical examination in diagnosing pelvic fractures in blunt trauma patients: a brief review Full Text available with Trip Pro

The value of clinical examination in diagnosing pelvic fractures in blunt trauma patients: a brief review To evaluate the value of a pelvic X-ray compared to clinical examination in diagnosing pelvic ring fractures, using computed tomography (CT) as the gold standard, in alert [Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) ≥ 13] adult blunt trauma patients in the emergency room.A systematic literature search was performed in PubMed and Embase. The results were screened on their titles and abstracts using (...) in- and exclusion criteria. Subsequently, the selected articles were critically appraised for their relevance and validity.Two studies investigating the diagnostic value of clinical examination and pelvic X-ray compared to CT were identified. Both studies demonstrate higher negative predictive values for clinical examination [0.99 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.98-1.0) and 1.0 (95% CI 0.99-1.0)] compared to the negative predictive values of pelvic X-ray [0.98 (95% CI 0.93-0.99) and 0.99 (95% CI 0.99-1.0

2011 European Journal of Trauma and Emergency Surgery

116. The Presence of Nonthoracic Distracting Injuries Does Not Affect the Initial Clinical Examination of the Cervical Spine in Evaluable Blunt Trauma Patients: A Prospective Observational Study. (Abstract)

The Presence of Nonthoracic Distracting Injuries Does Not Affect the Initial Clinical Examination of the Cervical Spine in Evaluable Blunt Trauma Patients: A Prospective Observational Study. A distracting injury mandates cervical spine (c-spine) imaging in the evaluable blunt trauma patient who demonstrates no pain or tenderness over the c-spine. The purpose of this study was to examine which distracting injuries can negatively affect the sensitivity of the standard clinical examination (...) of the c-spine.This is a prospective observational study conducted at a Level I Trauma Center from January 1, 2008, to December 31, 2009. After institutional review board approval, all evaluable (Glasgow Coma Scale score ≥13) blunt trauma patients older than 16 years sustaining a c-spine injury were enrolled. A distracting injury was defined as any immediately evident bony or soft tissue injury or a complaint of non-c-spine pain whether or not an actual injury was subsequently diagnosed. Information

2011 Journal of Trauma

117. Coma in fatal adult human malaria is not caused by cerebral oedema. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Coma in fatal adult human malaria is not caused by cerebral oedema. The role of brain oedema in the pathophysiology of cerebral malaria is controversial. Coma associated with severe Plasmodium falciparum malaria is multifactorial, but associated with histological evidence of parasitized erythrocyte sequestration and resultant microvascular congestion in cerebral vessels. To determine whether these changes cause breakdown of the blood-brain barrier and resultant perivascular or parenchymal (...) cerebral oedema, histology, immunohistochemistry and image analysis were used to define the prevalence of histological patterns of oedema and the expression of specific molecular pathways involved in water balance in the brain in adults with fatal falciparum malaria.The brains of 20 adult Vietnamese patients who died of severe malaria were examined for evidence of disrupted vascular integrity. Immunohistochemistry and image analysis was performed on brainstem sections for activation of the vascular

2011 Malaria journal

118. Coma Full Text available with Trip Pro

, complete . In contrast, coma resulting from a severe or can be instantaneous. The mode of onset may therefore be indicative of the underlying cause. Diagnosis [ ] Although diagnosis of coma is simple, investigating the underlying cause of onset can be rather challenging. As such, after gaining stabilization of the patient's airways, breathing and circulation (the basic s) various diagnostic tests, such as physical examinations and imagining tools ( , , etc.) are employed to access the underlying cause (...) of the coma. General Overview of Diagnostic steps [ ] When an unconscious patient enters a hospital, the hospital utilizes a series of diagnostic steps to identify the cause of . According to Young, the following steps should be taken when dealing with a patient possibly in a coma: Perform a general examination and medical history check Make sure the patient is in an actual comatose state and is not in or experiencing psychogenic unresponsiveness. Patients with present with voluntary movement their eyes

2012 Wikipedia

119. COVID-19 (Novel Coronavirus)

over the mouth and nose of a symptomatic patient can help to prevent transmission to others) ask all patients about presence of respiratory symptoms history of travel to areas experiencing transmission of COVID-19 contact with other persons with possible COVID-19 isolate the patient in an exam room with the door closed if an examination room is not readily available identify a separate, well-ventilated space that allows waiting patients to be separated by ≥ 6 feet, with access to respiratory (...) patchy shadows or ground glass opacity in lungs on chest computed tomography laboratory testing revealed lymphopenia (lymphocyte count < 1.1 × 10 9 cells/L) in 70.3% prolonged prothrombin time (> 12.5 seconds) in 58% elevated lactate dehydrogenase (> 243 units/L) in 39.9% severity of illness median scores in 36 patients in intensive care unit Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) 12 points Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) 5 points Glasgow Coma Scale 15 points

2020 DynaMed Plus

120. Stroke and transient ischaemic attack in over 16s: diagnosis and initial management

or thrombectomy on anticoagulant treatment a known bleeding tendency a depressed level of consciousness (Glasgow Coma Score below 13) unexplained progressive or fluctuating symptoms Stroke and transient ischaemic attack in over 16s: diagnosis and initial management (NG128) © NICE 2019. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and- conditions#notice-of-rights). Page 7 of 38papilloedema, neck stiffness or fever severe headache at onset of stroke symptoms. If thrombectomy (...) 220 mmHg. [2019] [2019] Aim for a systolic blood pressure target of 130 to 140 mmHg within 1 hour of starting treatment and maintain this blood pressure for at least 7 days. [2019] [2019] 1.5.6 Do not offer rapid blood pressure lowering to people who: have an underlying structural cause (for example, tumour, arteriovenous malformation or aneurysm) have a score on the Glasgow Coma Scale of below 6 are going to have early neurosurgery to evacuate the haematoma have a massive haematoma with a poor

2019 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

To help you find the content you need quickly, you can filter your results via the categories on the right-hand side >>>>