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Colicky Abdominal Pain

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1. Colicky Abdominal Pain

Colicky Abdominal Pain Colicky Abdominal Pain Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Colicky Abdominal Pain Colicky Abdominal (...) Pain Aka: Colicky Abdominal Pain , Colic II. Definition Sharp, localized in paroxysms III. Mechanism Partial or complete obstruction of hollow viscera IV. Causes: Examples Images: Related links to external sites (from Bing) These images are a random sampling from a Bing search on the term "Colicky Abdominal Pain." Click on the image (or right click) to open the source website in a new browser window. Related Studies (from Trip Database) Ontology: Abdominal colic (C0232488) Definition (MSH

2018 FP Notebook

2. CRACKCast E027 – Abdominal Pain

autonomic nerves in the visceral peritoneum surrounding organs A result of gas, fluid, stretching, edema, blood, cysts, abscesses If the affected organ undergoes peristalsis, then the pain is usually intermittent, crampy and/or colicky in nature Pain follows the embryonic somatic segments: Upper, periumbilical, lower abdominal pain Foregut = upper pain = from stomach, duodenum, liver, pancreas Midgut = periumbilical pain = small bowel, proximal colon, appendix Hindgut = lower abdominal pain = distal (...) CRACKCast E027 – Abdominal Pain CRACKCast E027 - Abdominal Pain - CanadiEM CRACKCast E027 – Abdominal Pain In , by Adam Thomas February 16, 2017 This episode of CRACKCast cover’s Rosen’s Chapter 27, Abdominal Pain. Abdominal pain is one of the most common presenting symptoms in the ER and a good approach is vital for ER docs. Shownotes – Rosen’s in Perspective Common and challenging presentation: History and physical examination can be misleading Serious pain can be benign and mild pain can

2017 CandiEM

3. No, torturing colicky infants by sticking them with acupuncture needles won’t calm them

, the acupuncturists were able to choose one point, or any combination of Sifeng, LI4 and ST36, depending on the infant's symptoms, as reported in the diary. A maximum of five insertions were allowed per treatment. ST36 is on the lateral aspect of the leg just under the knee and is gastric pain, vomiting, dysphagia, abdominal distention, borborygmus, diarrhea, indigestion, dysentery, constipation, abdominal pain, acute mastitis, emaciation due to general deficiency, palpitation, shortness of breath, poor appetite (...) No, torturing colicky infants by sticking them with acupuncture needles won’t calm them No, torturing colicky infants by sticking them with acupuncture needles won't calm them | ScienceBlogs Advertisment Search Search Toggle navigation Main navigation No, torturing colicky infants by sticking them with acupuncture needles won't calm them By on January 19, 2017. So I was distracted yesterday from what I had intended to write about by an irresistible target provided me courtesy of Toby Cosgrove

2017 Respectful Insolence

4. Novel Insights Into the Mechanisms of Abdominal Pain in Obstructive Bowel Disorders (PubMed)

Novel Insights Into the Mechanisms of Abdominal Pain in Obstructive Bowel Disorders Obstructive bowel disorders (OBD) are characterized by lumen distention due to mechanical or functional obstruction in the gut. Abdominal pain is one of the main symptoms in OBD. In this article, we aim to critically review the potential mechanisms for acute and chronic pain in bowel obstruction (BO). While clustered contractions and associated increase of intraluminal pressure may account for colicky pain (...) in simple obstruction, ischemia may be involved in acute pain in severe conditions such as closed loop obstruction. Recent preclinical studies discovered that visceral sensitivity is increased in BO, and visceral hypersensitivity may underlie the mechanisms of chronic abdominal pain in BO. Mounting evidence suggests that lumen distension, as a circumferential mechanical stretch, alters gene expression (mechano-transcription) in the distended bowel, and mechano-transcription of nociceptive

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2018 Frontiers in integrative neuroscience

5. Colicky Abdominal Pain

Colicky Abdominal Pain Colicky Abdominal Pain Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Colicky Abdominal Pain Colicky Abdominal (...) Pain Aka: Colicky Abdominal Pain , Colic II. Definition Sharp, localized in paroxysms III. Mechanism Partial or complete obstruction of hollow viscera IV. Causes: Examples Images: Related links to external sites (from Bing) These images are a random sampling from a Bing search on the term "Colicky Abdominal Pain." Click on the image (or right click) to open the source website in a new browser window. Related Studies (from Trip Database) Ontology: Abdominal colic (C0232488) Definition (MSH

2015 FP Notebook

6. A Case of Fatal Colonic Perforation without Abdominal Exam Findings

, rising concentrations of inflammatory cytokines in the intraperitoneal cavity activate mesothelial and mast cells on the visceral peritoneal surface, increasing capillary permeability and resulting in peritoneal edema [4]. Visceral peritoneal nociceptors then signal the afferent visceral nerves, arising from the T8-T10 spinal roots, which produce colicky, poorly-differentiated abdominal pain [5]. As the underlying visceral peritoneum becomes further inflamed, nociceptors on the overlying parietal (...) no flatus and required nasogastric tube decompression, with several days of laxatives, scheduled enemas, and attempts at manual disimpaction. Conservative management was unsuccessful at relieving her constipation. Frequent enemas and an aggressive bowel regimen continued. On hospital day 6, the patient complained of a dull left groin pain. Serial abdominal exams continued to be unremarkable. However, after several hours she became increasingly lethargic and hypotensive. At this time, physical

2018 Clinical Correlations

7. CRACKCast E086 – Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

through the duodenum and ureters. An acutely ruptured aneurysm vs. An expanding aneurysm may be clinically indistinguishable Presentations: Incidental: ***most AAA are discovered incidentally!!*** Pain – in the abdomen / back / flank / chest / thigh / groin / scrotum / Often vague, dull This can be in the contexts of weeks/days of pain due to a contained, rupture aneurysm retroperitoneal Throbbing, colicky Acute / severe pain suggests impending rupture An awareness of an abdominal mass / fullness Back (...) pain – due to vertebral body erosion Nausea, Vomiting, weight loss, bowel obstruction symptoms: Due to compression of the duodenum Ureteral colic Ureters being obstructed by the mass Syncope Upper or lower GI bleeding Aorto-enteric fistula: when an unrepaired AAA erodes through – usually the duodenum. It may initially cause intra-abdoMinal infection/abscess and then progress to unexplained GI bleeding. High-output congestive heart failure: Aortovenous/aortocaval fistula: the aorta erodes

2017 CandiEM

8. Effects on Crying Time in Colicky Infants With the Supplementation of Lactobacillus Reuteri DSM 17938

of a probiotic, Lactobacillus reuteri DSM 17938, could improve the perceived problems. The relationship between infant colic and gastroenterological, allergical and psychological disorders later in childhood was studied in a prospective study on 96 infants divided into two groups, colicky and non-colicky. The children diagnosed with infant colic, showed an increased susceptibility to recurrent abdominal pain, allergic and psychological disorders in childhood when they were 10 years old. The aetiology (...) Effects on Crying Time in Colicky Infants With the Supplementation of Lactobacillus Reuteri DSM 17938 Effects on Crying Time in Colicky Infants With the Supplementation of Lactobacillus Reuteri DSM 17938 - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please

2015 Clinical Trials

9. Buscopan Versus Acetaminophen for Acute Abdominal Pain in Children

: No Criteria Inclusion Criteria: All children aged 8-17 years presenting to the paediatric ED with: A chief complaint of colicky abdominal pain AND Pain score of at least 4/10 on the Faces Pain Scale - Revised AND A presumed non-surgical etiology Exclusion Criteria: Prior abdominal surgery Concomitant use of other anticholinergic medication including but not limited to tricyclic antidepressants, antihistamines, benztropine mesylate Signs and symptoms consistent with a bowel obstruction Peritoneal signs (...) Buscopan Versus Acetaminophen for Acute Abdominal Pain in Children Buscopan Versus Acetaminophen for Acute Abdominal Pain in Children - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. Buscopan Versus

2015 Clinical Trials

10. Abdominal cocoon with early postoperative small bowel obstruction: A case report and review of literature in China. (PubMed)

Abdominal cocoon with early postoperative small bowel obstruction: A case report and review of literature in China. Abdominal cocoon is a condition in which intestinal obstruction results from the encasement of part or whole of the small bowel by a thick fibrous membrane, giving the appearance of a cocoon. The preoperative diagnosis is difficult to be made and the treatment is still controversial.Here we describe the case of a 62-year-old male presented with a 24-h history of continual colicky (...) abdominal pain, which was accompanied with nausea and vomiting.Accurate diagnosis of abdominal cocoon was made intraoperatively.Membrane excision and adhesiolysis were performed and the patient experienced early postoperative small bowel obstruction. Nasointestinal obstruction tube was then installed and bowel function was gradually recovered by the 20th postoperative day.The patient recovered well and was discharged from the hospital on the 30th postoperative day LESSONS:: Abdominal cocoon can occur

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2018 Medicine

11. Omental Infarction: An Unusual Cause of Left-Sided Abdominal Pain (PubMed)

Omental Infarction: An Unusual Cause of Left-Sided Abdominal Pain Left-sided omental infarction (OI) is rare in both the adult and pediatric patients. To our knowledge, only 2 pediatric cases of a left-sided OI have been reported in the literature. We report a case of an obese 13-year-old male who presented with a 6-day history of intermittent, colicky, left upper quadrant abdominal pain.

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2014 ACG case reports journal

12. Acute pain management: scientific evidence (3rd Edition)

Acute musculoskeletal pain 253 9.6 Acute medical pain 254 9.6.1 Acute abdominal pain 254 9.6.2 Herpes zoster-associated pain 257 9.6.3 Acute cardiac pain 259 9.6.4 Acute pain associated with haematological disorders 260 9.6.5 Acute headache 264 9.6.6 Acute pain associated with neurological disorders 276 9.6.7 Orofacial pain 277 9.6.8 Acute pain in patients with HIV infection 282 9.7 Acute cancer pain 284 9.7.1 The scope of acute cancer pain 284 9.7.2 Principles of management of acute cancer pain 285 (...) Acute pain management: scientific evidence (3rd Edition) ? ? ? ? Acute Pain Management: Scientific Evidence Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists and Faculty of Pain Medicine ? ? ? Endorsed by: Faculty?of?Pain?Medicine,?Royal?College?of? Anaesthetists,?United?Kingdom?? Royal?College?of?Anaesthetists,? United?Kingdom?? Australian?Pain?Society? Australasian?Faculty?of?Rehabilitation?Medicine? College?of?Anaesthesiologists,?? Academy?of?Medicine,?Malaysia? College

2015 National Health and Medical Research Council

13. Acute Pain Management: Scientific Evidence

307 8.6.1 Acute abdominal pain 307 8.6.2 Herpes zoster-associated pain 310 8.6.3 Acute cardiac pain 312 8.6.4 Acute pain associated with haematological disorders 313 8.6.5 Acute headache 317 8.6.6 Acute pain associated with neurological disorders 327 8.6.7 Orofacial pain 329 8.6.8 Acute pain in patients with HIV infection 336 8.7 Acute cancer pain 339 8.7.1 Assessment of acute cancer pain 339 8.7.2 Principles of management of acute cancer pain 339xviii Acute Pain Management: Scientific Evidence (...) Acute Pain Management: Scientific Evidence ACUTE PAIN MANAGEMENT: SCIENTIFIC EVIDENCE Fourth Edition 2015 Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists and Faculty of Pain Medicine Edited by: Stephan A Schug Greta M Palmer David A Scott Richard Halliwell Jane T rinca© Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists 2015 ISBN Print: 978-0-9873236-7-5 Online: 978-0-9873236-6-8 This work is copyright. Apart from any use as permitted under the Copyright Act 1968, no part may be reproduced

2015 Clinical Practice Guidelines Portal

14. Palliative cancer care - pain

to stimulation of nociceptors in the skin and deep musculoskeletal tissues (for example, pain from bone metastases, post-surgical incision pain, myofascial or musculoskeletal pain). Visceral pain — due to stretching, compression, distension, or infiltration of thoracic or abdominal viscera (for example, from liver metastases, pancreatic cancer, intestinal obstruction). Neuropathic painpain occurring in an area of altered sensation due to injury to the peripheral or central nervous system (for example (...) , severe pain prior to assessment. : covers the assessment of pain in terms of severity, trying to find an underlying cause, and the effects of pain on the person's life, in order to influence management. : covers a stepwise approach to the management of persistent pain, based on the World Health Organization analgesic ladder. : covers the management of neuropathic pain. : covers the management of pain caused by increased intracranial pressure. : covers the management of colicky pain. : covers

2016 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

15. ABDOMINAL PAIN IN ADULT SICKLE CELL DISEASE PATIENTS: A NIGERIAN EXPERIENCE (PubMed)

of abdominal pain. The pain was mainly colicky or tightening, moderate to severe in nature and, in some cases, associated with vomiting. We did not find any significant difference between the steady state PCV and the PCV during the acute abdominal pain episodes. The final diagnosis showed that only 38.8% of the patients had vasoocclusive crises and the reliability index between the provisional diagnosis and the final diagnosis was 67%.Abdominal pain in sickle cell disease may present in different ways (...) ABDOMINAL PAIN IN ADULT SICKLE CELL DISEASE PATIENTS: A NIGERIAN EXPERIENCE Abdominal pain is a relatively frequent occurrence in sickle cell disease. The aetiology of abdominal pain in sickle cell disease is often difficult to diagnose clinically. Despite the frequent occurrence, diagnostic dilemma, and the need for an accurate, early diagnosis, abdominal pain in sickle cell disease has not been rigorously studied.We therefore sought to describe the different presentations and patterns

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2011 Annals of Ibadan postgraduate medicine

16. Chronic and Recurrent Abdominal Pain

consultation Fever, flank pain, dark or bloody urine Urine culture IVU CT Sequelae of Pelvic discomfort History of acute PID Pelvic examination Sometimes laparoscopy GI disorders In children, failure to thrive Abdominal bloating, diarrhea, and often steatorrhea Symptoms that worsen when gluten-containing products are ingested Serologic markers Small-bowel biopsy Several previous discrete episodes of RLQ pain Abdominal CT Ultrasonography Recurrent colicky RUQ pain Ultrasonography HIDA scan Upper abdominal (...) MRCP or ERCP Parasitic infestation (particularly ) History of travel or exposure Cramps, flatulence, diarrhea Stool examination for ova or parasites Stool enzyme immunoassay (for Giardia ) Upper abdominal pain relieved by food and antacids May awaken patient at night Endoscopy and biopsy for Helicobacter pylori H. pylori breath test Evaluation of NSAID use Stool examination for occult blood Postoperative adhesive bands Previous abdominal surgery Colicky discomfort accompanied by nausea

2013 Merck Manual (19th Edition)

17. Acute Abdominal Pain

in less pain, tenderness, or leukocytosis than might otherwise be expected. Anticoagulants can increase the chances of bleeding and hematoma formation. Alcohol predisposes to pancreatitis. Table History in Patients with Acute Abdominal Pain Question Potential Responses and Indications Where is the pain? See figure: What is the pain like? Acute waves of sharp constricting pain that “take the breath away” (renal or biliary colic) Waves of dull pain with vomiting ( ) Colicky pain that becomes steady (...) Acute Abdominal Pain Acute Abdominal Pain - Gastrointestinal Disorders - MSD Manual Professional Edition Brought to you by The trusted provider of medical information since 1899 SEARCH SEARCH MEDICAL TOPICS Common Health Topics Resources QUIZZES & CASES Quizzes Cases The trusted provider of medical information since 1899 SEARCH SEARCH MEDICAL TOPICS Common Health Topics Resources QUIZZES & CASES Quizzes Cases / / / / IN THIS TOPIC OTHER TOPICS IN THIS CHAPTER Test your knowledge Helicobacter

2013 Merck Manual (19th Edition)

18. Gynecologic Pain (Diagnosis)

of the causes of gynecologic pain with links to other Medscape Drugs & Diseases articles is included at the end of this article. Next: Acute Pelvic Pain Associated Symptoms and Differentiation Acute pain due to ischemia or injury to a viscus is accompanied by autonomic reflex responses such as nausea, vomiting, restlessness, and sweating. The following is a discussion of some of the important gynecologic causes of acute abdominal pain. Culdocentesis can still be a useful diagnostic aid for differentiating (...) a reproductive age woman presents with pelivic pain and a positive pregnancy test. An unruptured ectopic pregnancy produces localized pain due to dilatation of the fallopian tube. Once the ectopic pregnancy is ruptured, the pain tends to be generalized due to peritoneal irritation. Symptoms of rectal urgency due to a mass in the pouch of Douglas may also be present. Syncope, dizziness, and orthostatic changes in blood pressure are sensitive signs of hypovolemia in these patients. Abdominal examination

2014 eMedicine.com

19. Pathophysiology of Chronic Back Pain (Treatment)

or metastatic neoplasms Osseous, diskal, or epidural infections Inflammatory spondyloarthropathy Metabolic bone diseases, including osteoporosis Vascular disorders (eg, atherosclerosis, vasculitis) Referred pain Gastrointestinal disorders (eg, pancreatitis, pancreatic cancer, cholecystitis) Cardiorespiratory disorders (eg, pericarditis, pleuritis, pneumonia) Disorders of the ribs or sternum Genitourinary disorders (eg, nephrolithiasis, prostatitis, pyelonephritis) Thoracic or abdominal aortic aneurysms Hip (...) below: Pain unrelieved by rest or any postural modification Pain unchanged despite treatment for 2-4 weeks Writhing pain behavior Colicky pain or pain associated with a visceral function Known or previous cancer Fever or immunosuppressed status High risk for fracture (eg, older age, osteoporosis) Associated malaise, fatigue, or weight loss Progressive neurological impairment Bowel or bladder dysfunction Severe morning stiffness as the primary complaint Patients unable to ambulate or care for self

2014 eMedicine.com

20. Pathophysiology of Chronic Back Pain (Overview)

or metastatic neoplasms Osseous, diskal, or epidural infections Inflammatory spondyloarthropathy Metabolic bone diseases, including osteoporosis Vascular disorders (eg, atherosclerosis, vasculitis) Referred pain Gastrointestinal disorders (eg, pancreatitis, pancreatic cancer, cholecystitis) Cardiorespiratory disorders (eg, pericarditis, pleuritis, pneumonia) Disorders of the ribs or sternum Genitourinary disorders (eg, nephrolithiasis, prostatitis, pyelonephritis) Thoracic or abdominal aortic aneurysms Hip (...) below: Pain unrelieved by rest or any postural modification Pain unchanged despite treatment for 2-4 weeks Writhing pain behavior Colicky pain or pain associated with a visceral function Known or previous cancer Fever or immunosuppressed status High risk for fracture (eg, older age, osteoporosis) Associated malaise, fatigue, or weight loss Progressive neurological impairment Bowel or bladder dysfunction Severe morning stiffness as the primary complaint Patients unable to ambulate or care for self

2014 eMedicine.com

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