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Clostridium perfringens

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1. Salmonella-vectored vaccine delivering three Clostridium perfringens antigens protects poultry against necrotic enteritis. (PubMed)

Salmonella-vectored vaccine delivering three Clostridium perfringens antigens protects poultry against necrotic enteritis. Necrotic enteritis is an economically important poultry disease caused by the bacterium Clostridium perfringens. There are currently no necrotic enteritis vaccines commercially available for use in broiler birds, the most important target population. Salmonella-vectored vaccines represent a convenient and effective option for controlling this disease. We used a single (...) attenuated Salmonella vaccine strain, engineered to lyse within the host, to deliver up to three C. perfringens antigens. Two of the antigens were toxoids, based on C. perfringens α-toxin and NetB toxin. The third antigen was fructose-1,6-bisphosphate aldolase (Fba), a metabolic enzyme with an unknown role in virulence. Oral immunization with a single Salmonella vaccine strain producing either Fba, α-toxoid and NetB toxoid, or all three antigens, was immunogenic, inducing serum, cellular and mucosal

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2019 PLoS ONE

2. Analysis of gut microbiota and the effect of lauric acid against necrotic enteritis in Clostridium perfringens and Eimeria side-by-side challenge model. (PubMed)

Analysis of gut microbiota and the effect of lauric acid against necrotic enteritis in Clostridium perfringens and Eimeria side-by-side challenge model. Gut microbiota has been demonstrated to be involved in intestinal nutrition, defense, and immunity, as well as participating in disease progression. This study was to investigate gut microbiota changes in chickens challenged with netB-positive Clostridium perfringens strain (CP1) and/or the predisposing Eimeria species (Eimeria) and fed diets (...) on these two taxa increased the severity of NE lesions. Further analyses of metagenomeSeq, STAMP, and LEfSe consistently showed significant overgrowth of Clostridium sensu stricto 1 was associated with NE. The supplementation of lauric acid did not reduce NE incidence and severity but decreased the relative abundance of Escherichia Shigella. In conclusion, significant overgrowth of C. perfringens as well as other Clostridium species in Clostridium sensu stricto 1 with the decrement of Lactobacillus

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2019 PLoS ONE

3. Effect of probiotic treatment on the clinical course, intestinal microbiome, and toxigenic Clostridium perfringens in dogs with acute hemorrhagic diarrhea. (PubMed)

Effect of probiotic treatment on the clinical course, intestinal microbiome, and toxigenic Clostridium perfringens in dogs with acute hemorrhagic diarrhea. The impact of probiotics on dogs with acute hemorrhagic diarrhea syndrome (AHDS) has not been evaluated so far. The study aim was to assess the effect of probiotic treatment on the clinical course, intestinal microbiome, and toxigenic Clostridium perfringens in dogs with AHDS in a prospective, placebo-controlled, blinded trial.Twenty-five (...) dogs with AHDS with no signs of sepsis were randomly divided into a probiotic (PRO; Visbiome, ExeGi Pharma) and placebo group (PLAC). Treatment was administered for 21 days without antibiotics. Clinical signs were evaluated daily from day 0 to day 8. Key bacterial taxa, C. perfringens encoding NetF toxin and enterotoxin were assessed on days 0, 7, 21.Both groups showed a rapid clinical improvement. In PRO a significant clinical recovery was observed on day 3 (p = 0.008), while in PLAC

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2018 PLoS ONE

4. Disruption in the cecal microbiota of chickens challenged with Clostridium perfringens and other factors was alleviated by Bacillus licheniformis supplementation. (PubMed)

Disruption in the cecal microbiota of chickens challenged with Clostridium perfringens and other factors was alleviated by Bacillus licheniformis supplementation. Clostridium perfringens can induce necrotic enteritis of chickens, which causes large economic losses every year. Bacillus licheniformis, a probiotic, can inhibit the growth of pathogenic bacteria such as Clostridium perfringens, thereby improving the health status of chickens. However, from a microbial ecology perspective (...) , the mechanisms by which alterations to the gut microbiota improve health remain unknown. In this study, we used Illumina MiSeq sequencing to investigate the cecal microbiota of a negative control group (NC), a C. perfringens and Eimeria challenge group with fishmeal supplementation (PC), a group supplemented with fishmeal and infected with coccidia (FC), and group PC with B. licheniformis supplementation (BL). We found that the health status of C. perfringens-challenged chickens was compromised, and that B

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2017 PLoS ONE

5. Type A fulminant Clostridium perfringens sepsis indicated RBC/Hb discrepancy; a case report. (PubMed)

Type A fulminant Clostridium perfringens sepsis indicated RBC/Hb discrepancy; a case report. Clostridium perfringens can cause various infections, including food poisoning, gas gangrene, cellulitis and fasciitis. C. perfringens septicemia is rare, but is a known cause of hemolysis by damaging red blood cell, and often proves rapidly fatal in emergency department (ED) situations.A previously healthy 76-year-old man presented to the ED 8 h after onset of acute abdominal pain and diarrhea (...) should prompt ED physicians to consider C. perfringens septicemia and to act quickly to provide appropriate treatment.

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2019 BMC Infectious Diseases

6. In vitro and in vivo antagonistic activity of new probiotic culture against Clostridium difficile and Clostridium perfringens (PubMed)

In vitro and in vivo antagonistic activity of new probiotic culture against Clostridium difficile and Clostridium perfringens Genus Clostridium accompanies more than 200 known species and at least 30 among them are associated with human and animal diseases. At the moment, the treatment of clostridial infections is based on use of antibiotics. However, due to the European ban on the use of antibiotics in livestock production, novel therapeutic strategies for treatment of these hardly curable (...) infections have been evaluated. Hence, in this study the antimicrobial effect of newly designed probiotic culture consisted of natural isolates Lactobacillus helveticus BGRA43, Lactobacillus fermentum BGHI14 and Streptococcus thermophilus BGVLJ1-44 against Clostridium difficile and Clostridium perfringens was analyzed.The probiotic culture showed strong in vitro antimicrobial effect on C. difficile (human clinical isolate). In addition, individual strains and the probiotic combination exhibited

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2017 BMC microbiology

7. Data from a survey of Clostridium perfringens and Clostridium difficile shedding by dogs and cats in the Madrid region (Spain), including phenotypic and genetic characteristics of recovered isolates (PubMed)

Data from a survey of Clostridium perfringens and Clostridium difficile shedding by dogs and cats in the Madrid region (Spain), including phenotypic and genetic characteristics of recovered isolates This article contains information related to a recent survey of the prevalence of fecal shedding of Clostridium perfringens and C. difficile by dogs and cats attended in veterinary clinics located in the Madrid region (Spain). Specifically, we provide detailed information about the clinics

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2017 Data in brief

8. Cellular Entry of Clostridium perfringens Iota-Toxin and Clostridium botulinum C2 Toxin (PubMed)

Cellular Entry of Clostridium perfringens Iota-Toxin and Clostridium botulinum C2 Toxin Clostridium perfringens iota-toxin and Clostridium botulinum C2 toxin are composed of two non-linked proteins, one being the enzymatic component and the other being the binding/translocation component. These latter components recognize specific receptors and oligomerize in plasma membrane lipid-rafts, mediating the uptake of the enzymatic component into the cytosol. Enzymatic components induce actin

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2017 Toxins

9. Temporal Effects of High Fishmeal Diet on Gut Microbiota and Immune Response in Clostridium perfringens-Challenged Chickens (PubMed)

Temporal Effects of High Fishmeal Diet on Gut Microbiota and Immune Response in Clostridium perfringens-Challenged Chickens Necrotic enteritis (NE) caused by Clostridium perfringens is responsible for huge financial losses in the poultry industry annually. A diet highly supplemented with fishmeal is one factor predisposing chickens to the development of clinical NE. However, the effects of fishmeal-rich diets on the gut microbiota and immune response in chickens with C. perfringens challenge (...) over the long-term are not well-understood. Here, a chicken NE model was established in which chickens were fed high fishmeal diet and subsequently infected with C. perfringens (FM/CP). Two control groups of chickens, one that was not infected and had a high fishmeal feeding (FM) and another group only infected with C. perfringens with basic diets (CP), were used as comparators. We analyzed the gut microbiota and immune response of the three groups at the age of 20, 24 [1 day post-infection (dpi

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2018 Frontiers in microbiology

10. Plant-expressed bacteriophage lysins control pathogenic strains of Clostridium perfringens (PubMed)

Plant-expressed bacteriophage lysins control pathogenic strains of Clostridium perfringens The anaerobic spore-forming bacterium Clostridium perfringens is a source of one of the most common food-borne illnesses in the United States and Europe. The costs associated with disease management are high and interventions are limited; therefore, effective and safe antimicrobials are needed to control food contamination by C. perfringens. A viable solution to this problem could be bacteriophage lysins (...) used as food additives or food processing aids. Such antimicrobials could be produced cost-effectively and in ample supply in green plants. By using edible plant species as production hosts the need for expensive product purification can be reduced or obviated. We describe the first successful expression in plants of C. perfringens-specific bacteriophage lysins. We demonstrate that six lysins belonging to two different families (N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase and glycosyl hydrolase 25

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2018 Scientific reports

11. NanI Sialidase Can Support the Growth and Survival of Clostridium perfringens Strain F4969 in the Presence of Sialyated Host Macromolecules (Mucin) or Caco-2 Cells (PubMed)

NanI Sialidase Can Support the Growth and Survival of Clostridium perfringens Strain F4969 in the Presence of Sialyated Host Macromolecules (Mucin) or Caco-2 Cells Enterotoxin-producing Clostridium perfringens type A strains cause human gastrointestinal (GI) infections, including a very common food poisoning and 5 to 10% of all cases of antibiotic-associated diarrhea. This bacterium can utilize free sialic acid for growth, but most sialic acids in the GI tract are sequestered on macromolecules (...) , such as the mucin proteins of mucus or glycoconjugates in host cells. However, many C. perfringens strains produce sialidases that might promote growth and survival by generating free sialic acid from those sialyated host macromolecules or by exposing underlying carbohydrates or proteins for digestion by other enzymes. The current study tested that possibility and found that the C. perfringens nonfoodborne human GI disease strain F4969 can use either a mucin preparation or Caco-2 cells, which are human

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2018 Infection and immunity

12. Clostridium perfringens Septicemia and a Bleeding Ulcer of a Jejunal Interposition: A Case Report and Short Review of the Literature (PubMed)

Clostridium perfringens Septicemia and a Bleeding Ulcer of a Jejunal Interposition: A Case Report and Short Review of the Literature We report a case of Clostridium perfringens septicemia in a patient presenting with a bleeding ulcer of a jejunal interposition.An 81-year-old female patient was acutely admitted to our hospital due to hematemesis and melena. She had a history of metastatic gastrointestinal stromal tumor, for which she was receiving second line treatment with sunitinib. She had (...) also undergone a Merendino procedure 4 years prior to presentation. The patient underwent emergency gastroscopy, which revealed a bleeding ulcer in the jejunal interposition. Despite initial endoscopic control of the bleeding and transfusion of blood products, the hemoglobin level continued to drop, and the patient was treated for an assumed hemolytic transfusion reaction. The patient died 3 days following admission, and the results of blood cultures later confirmed a Clostridium perfringens

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2018 Case reports in medicine

13. Effects of Bacillus coagulans supplementation on the growth performance and gut health of broiler chickens with Clostridium perfringens-induced necrotic enteritis (PubMed)

Effects of Bacillus coagulans supplementation on the growth performance and gut health of broiler chickens with Clostridium perfringens-induced necrotic enteritis The poultry industry is in need of effective antibiotic alternatives to control outbreaks of necrotic enteritis (NE) due to Clostridium perfringens.This study was conducted to investigate the effects of feeding Bacillus coagulans on the growth performance and gut health of broiler chickens with C. perfringens-induced NE. Two hundred (...) and forty 1-day-old broiler chicks were randomly assigned to a 2 × 2 factorial arrangement with two dietary B. coagulans levels (0 or 4 × 109 CFU/kg of diet) and two disease challenge statuses (control or NE challenged).NE-induced reduction in body weight gain was relieved by the addition of B. coagulans into broiler diets compared with the NE-infected birds. NE infection damaged intestinal morphological structure, promoted intestinal C. perfringens growth and liver invasion, and enhanced anti-C

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2018 Journal of animal science and biotechnology

14. Growth-Promoting and Antioxidant Effects of Magnolia Bark Extract in Chickens Uninfected or Co-Infected with Clostridium perfringens and Eimeria maxima as an Experimental Model of Necrotic Enteritis (PubMed)

Growth-Promoting and Antioxidant Effects of Magnolia Bark Extract in Chickens Uninfected or Co-Infected with Clostridium perfringens and Eimeria maxima as an Experimental Model of Necrotic Enteritis Magnolia tree bark has been widely used in traditional Asian medicine. However, to our knowledge, no studies have been reported investigating the effects of dietary supplementation with magnolia bark extract in chickens.We tested the hypothesis that dietary supplementation of chickens (...) with a Magnolia officinalis bark extract would increase growth performance in uninfected and Eimeria maxima/Clostridium perfringens co-infected chickens.A total of 168 chickens were fed from hatch either a standard diet or a diet supplemented with 0.33 mg or 0.56 mg M. officinalis bark extract/kg (M/H low or M/H high, respectively) from days 1 to 35. At day 14, half of the chickens were orally infected with E. maxima, followed by C. perfringens infection at day 18 to induce experimental avian necrotic

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2018 Current Developments in Nutrition

15. Commentary: Probing Genomic Aspects of the Multi-Host Pathogen Clostridium perfringens Reveals Significant Pangenome Diversity, and a Diverse Array of Virulence Factors (PubMed)

Commentary: Probing Genomic Aspects of the Multi-Host Pathogen Clostridium perfringens Reveals Significant Pangenome Diversity, and a Diverse Array of Virulence Factors 30154769 2018 11 14 1664-302X 9 2018 Frontiers in microbiology Front Microbiol Commentary: Probing Genomic Aspects of the Multi-Host Pathogen Clostridium perfringens Reveals Significant Pangenome Diversity, and a Diverse Array of Virulence Factors. 1856 10.3389/fmicb.2018.01856 Mehdizadeh Gohari Iman I Department of Pathobiology (...) , University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada. Prescott John F JF Department of Pathobiology, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada. eng Journal Article Comment 2018 08 14 Switzerland Front Microbiol 101548977 1664-302X Front Microbiol. 2017 Dec 12;8:2485 29312194 Front Microbiol. 2018 Aug 16;9:1857 30166979 Clostridium perfringens clostridial infection comparative genomics genetic relatedness genetic variation pangenome whole genome sequencing 2017 12 20 2018 07 24 2018 8 30 6 0 2018 8 30 6 0 2018 8 30 6

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2018 Frontiers in microbiology

16. Clostridium perfringens Enterotoxin: The Toxin Forms Highly Cation-Selective Channels in Lipid Bilayers (PubMed)

Clostridium perfringens Enterotoxin: The Toxin Forms Highly Cation-Selective Channels in Lipid Bilayers One of the numerous toxins produced by Clostridium perfringens is Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin (CPE), a polypeptide with a molecular mass of 35.5 kDa exhibiting three different domains. Domain one is responsible for receptor binding, domain two is involved in hexamer formation and domain three has to do with channel formation in membranes. CPE is the major virulence factor (...) with a single-channel conductance of 620 pS in 1 M KCl. The single-channel conductance was not a linear function of the bulk aqueous salt concentration indicating that point-negative charges at the CPE channel controlled ion transport. This resulted in the high cation selectivity of the CPE channels, which suggested that anions are presumably not permeable through the CPE channels. The possible role of cation transport by CPE channels in disease caused by C. perfringens is discussed.

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2018 Toxins

17. Response: Commentary: Probing Genomic Aspects of the Multi-Host Pathogen Clostridium perfringens Reveals Significant Pangenome Diversity, and a Diverse Array of Virulence Factors (PubMed)

Response: Commentary: Probing Genomic Aspects of the Multi-Host Pathogen Clostridium perfringens Reveals Significant Pangenome Diversity, and a Diverse Array of Virulence Factors 30166979 2018 11 14 1664-302X 9 2018 Frontiers in microbiology Front Microbiol Response: Commentary: Probing Genomic Aspects of the Multi-Host Pathogen Clostridium perfringens Reveals Significant Pangenome Diversity, and a Diverse Array of Virulence Factors. 1857 10.3389/fmicb.2018.01857 Kiu Raymond R Gut Microbes (...) infection Clostridium perfringens antimicrobial resistance exotoxins genomics pangenome pathogen whole genome sequencing 2018 06 02 2018 07 24 2018 9 1 6 0 2018 9 1 6 0 2018 9 1 6 1 epublish 30166979 10.3389/fmicb.2018.01857 PMC6106619 J Med Microbiol. 2005 Feb;54(Pt 2):129-35 15673505 Vet Microbiol. 2004 May 20;100(1-2):11-6 15135508 Front Microbiol. 2017 Dec 12;8:2485 29312194 PLoS Genet. 2016 Sep 12;12(9):e1006280 27618184 PLoS Pathog. 2008 Feb 8;4(2):e26 18266469 Nat Microbiol. 2017 Mar 28;2:17040

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2018 Frontiers in microbiology

18. Whole genome analysis reveals the diversity and evolutionary relationships between necrotic enteritis-causing strains of Clostridium perfringens (PubMed)

Whole genome analysis reveals the diversity and evolutionary relationships between necrotic enteritis-causing strains of Clostridium perfringens Clostridium perfringens causes a range of diseases in animals and humans including necrotic enteritis in chickens and food poisoning and gas gangrene in humans. Necrotic enteritis is of concern in commercial chicken production due to the cost of the implementation of infection control measures and to productivity losses. This study has focused (...) on the genomic analysis of a range of chicken-derived C. perfringens isolates, from around the world and from different years. The genomes were sequenced and compared with 20 genomes available from public databases, which were from a diverse collection of isolates from chickens, other animals, and humans. We used a distance based phylogeny that was constructed based on gene content rather than sequence identity. Similarity between strains was defined as the number of genes that they have in common divided

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2018 BMC genomics

19. Acid Sphingomyelinase Promotes Cellular Internalization of Clostridium perfringens Iota-Toxin (PubMed)

Acid Sphingomyelinase Promotes Cellular Internalization of Clostridium perfringens Iota-Toxin Clostridium perfringens iota-toxin is a binary actin-ADP-ribosylating toxin composed of the enzymatic component Ia and receptor binding component Ib. Ib binds to a cell surface receptor, forms Ib oligomer in lipid rafts, and associates with Ia. The Ia-Ib complex then internalizes by endocytosis. Here, we showed that acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase) facilitates the cellular uptake of iota-toxin

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2018 Toxins

20. Clostridium perfringens Virulent Bacteriophage CPS2 and Its Thermostable Endolysin LysCPS2 (PubMed)

Clostridium perfringens Virulent Bacteriophage CPS2 and Its Thermostable Endolysin LysCPS2 Clostridium perfringens is one of the most common causes of food-borne illness. The increasing prevalence of multidrug-resistant bacteria requires the development of alternatives to typical antimicrobial treatments. Here, we isolated and characterized a C. perfringens-specific virulent bacteriophage CPS2 from chicken feces. The CPS2 phage contains a 17,961 bp double-stranded DNA genome with 25 putative (...) ORFs, and belongs to the Picovirinae, subfamily of Podoviridae. Bioinformatic analysis of the CPS2 genome revealed a putative endolysin, LysCPS2, which is homologous to the endolysin of Clostridium phage phiZP2 and phiCP7R. The enzyme showed strong lytic activity against C. perfringens with optimum conditions at pH 7.5⁻10, 25⁻65 °C, and over a broad range of NaCl concentrations. Interestingly, LysCPS2 was found to be highly thermostable, with up to 30% of its lytic activity remaining after 10 min

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2018 Viruses

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