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Ciguatera Poisoning

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81. Communicating diagnostic uncertainty

. Evidence based medicine junkie. “One special advantage of the skeptical attitude of mind is that a man is never vexed to find that after all he has been in the wrong.” - William Osler You may also like Published In the Rapid Review series, I briefly review the key points of a clinical review paper. The topic this time: Ciguatera poisoning The […] Share this: Like this: Like Loading... Published Welcome to First10EM, a FOAMed project where I plan to contemplate the necessary actions of the first 10

2016 First10EM

82. Taking a translational turn Full Text available with Trip Pro

Taking a translational turn 23109713 2013 04 11 2018 11 13 1540-7748 140 5 2012 Nov The Journal of general physiology J. Gen. Physiol. Taking a translational turn. 455-6 10.1085/jgp.201210911 Adler Elizabeth M EM eadler@rockefeller.edu eng Editorial United States J Gen Physiol 2985110R 0022-1295 0 Transient Receptor Potential Channels 0 Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels 126880-72-6 Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator IM Animals Channelopathies genetics Ciguatera Poisoning

2012 The Journal of general physiology

83. Protective effect of Heliotropium foertherianum (Boraginaceae) folk remedy and its active compound, rosmarinic acid, against a Pacific ciguatoxin. (Abstract)

Protective effect of Heliotropium foertherianum (Boraginaceae) folk remedy and its active compound, rosmarinic acid, against a Pacific ciguatoxin. Senescent leaves of Heliotropium foertherianum Diane & Hilger (Boraginaceae) are traditionally used in the Pacific region to treat Ciguatera Fish Poisoning. This plant contains rosmarinic acid that is known for its multiple biological activities. In the present study, H. foertherianum aqueous extract, rosmarinic acid and its derivatives were (...) and rosmarinic acid showed inhibitory activities against a Pacific ciguatoxin in the above bioassays. Among all the molecules that were evaluated, rosmarinic acid was the most active compound.These results confirm further the potential of H. foertherianum in the treatment of Ciguatera Fish Poisoning.Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

2012 Journal of Ethnopharmacology

84. Management of status epilepticus in the emergency department

is that a man is never vexed to find that after all he has been in the wrong.” - William Osler You may also like Published A simplified approach to the initial assessment and management of emergency department patients with massive hemoptysis Share this: Like this: Like Loading... Published In the Rapid Review series, I briefly review the key points of a clinical review paper. The topic this time: Ciguatera poisoning The […] Share this: Like this: Like Loading... Published An approach to intubation

2015 First10EM

85. Procedure: Umbilical Vein Catheterization

follows is a post that you will see on a number of websites this week explaining the petition to retract the […] Share this: Like this: Like Loading... Published Welcome to the year-end edition of the Articles of the Month (released well into the new year because of the craziness of […] Share this: Like this: Like Loading... Published In the Rapid Review series, I briefly review the key points of a clinical review paper. The topic this time: Ciguatera poisoning The […] Share this: Like this: Like

2015 First10EM

86. Problems of toxicants in marine food products: 1. Marine biotoxins Full Text available with Trip Pro

is poisonous, appear to constitute the most significant health hazard. A list of fishes reported as causing ciguatera poisoning (one of the most serious and widespread forms of ichthyosarcotoxism) is included in this paper. (...) Problems of toxicants in marine food products: 1. Marine biotoxins The expansion of marine fisheries into tropical waters, which is now occurring, will increase the risks of widespread poisonings because of the abundance of biotoxins in warm-water organisms. However, toxic marine organisms are not only a health hazard but also a possible source of new pharmaceutical products.A classification of marine intoxicants is given in this paper with special reference to the oral biotoxins which

1970 Bulletin of the World Health Organization

87. Characterisation of the anti-inflammatory potential of Vitex trifolia L. (Labiatae), a multipurpose plant of the Pacific traditional medicine. (Abstract)

Characterisation of the anti-inflammatory potential of Vitex trifolia L. (Labiatae), a multipurpose plant of the Pacific traditional medicine. Vitex trifolia L. (Labiatae) is a plant commonly employed against Ciguatera Fish Poisoning (CFP) in the Pacific region. Here, the anti-inflammatory potential of an aqueous extract of Vitex trifolia leaves was evaluated by monitoring its effects on the modulation of cytokines, the mediators of inflammation, as well as on the expression profiles

2009 Journal of Ethnopharmacology

88. What are the potential causes of foot numbness, spreading to both legs?

], reporting the following: 1. Acroosteolysis neurogenic 2. Broken foot 3. Buerger's disease 4. Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disorder 5. Chronic Kidney Disease 6. Ciguatera poisoning 7. Diabetes 8. Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy 9. Hyperventilation 10. Hypocalcemia, autosomal dominant 11. Olivopontocerebellar Atrophy 12. POEMS syndrome 13. Peripheral neuropathy 14. Polyneuritis 15. Porphyria, hereditary coproporphyria 16. Pyridoxine deficiency 17. Subacute combined degeneration of the spinal cord 18. Tarsal tunnel

2008 TRIP Answers

89. Harmful algal blooms and eutrophication: Examining linkages from selected coastal regions of the United States Full Text available with Trip Pro

Harmful algal blooms and eutrophication: Examining linkages from selected coastal regions of the United States Coastal waters of the United States (U.S.) are subject to many of the major harmful algal bloom (HAB) poisoning syndromes and impacts. These include paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP), neurotoxic shellfish poisoning (NSP), amnesic shellfish poisoning (ASP), ciguatera fish poisoning (CFP) and various other HAB phenomena such as fish kills, loss of submerged vegetation, shellfish

2008 Harmful algae

90. Literature Review of Florida Red Tide: Implications for Human Health Effects Full Text available with Trip Pro

the brevetoxins). With the ingestion of brevetoxin-contaminated shellfish, neurotoxic shellfish poisoning (NSP) presents as a milder gastroenteritis with neurologic symptoms compared with other marine toxin diseases such as paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) or ciguatera fish poisoning. With the inhalation of the aerosolized red tide toxins (especially the brevetoxins) from the sea spray, respiratory irritation and possibly other health effects are reported in both humans and other mammals (Baden 1995

2004 Harmful algae

91. First- and second-generation total synthesis of ciguatoxin CTX3C Full Text available with Trip Pro

First- and second-generation total synthesis of ciguatoxin CTX3C More than 20,000 people suffer annually from ciguatera seafood poisoning in subtropical and tropical regions. The extremely low content of the causative neurotoxins, designated as ciguatoxins, in fish has hampered isolation, detailed biological studies, and preparation of anti-ciguatoxin antibodies for detecting these toxins. Furthermore, the large (3 nm in length) and complex molecular structure of ciguatoxins has impeded

2004 Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America

92. Contemporary issues in food allergy: seafood toxin-induced disease in the differential diagnosis of allergic reactions. (Abstract)

in the shellfish, and the amount of contaminated shellfish consumed. Five types of shellfish poisoning have been identified clearly including paralytic, neurotoxic, diarrhetic, amnestic, and azaspiracid shellfish poisonings. Based on the presence or absence of the toxin at the time of capture, fish poisoning can be considered conceptually in two categories. In ciguatera and puffer fish poisoning, the toxin is present in live fish, whereas in scombroid, it is produced only after capture, in the fish flesh (...) Contemporary issues in food allergy: seafood toxin-induced disease in the differential diagnosis of allergic reactions. Seafood, including fish, shrimp, lobster, crab, crayfish, mussel, and clam are among the most frequent causes of food allergy. Seafood poisoning, including reactions to natural toxins, frequently masquerades as an allergic reaction on presentation. Ingestion of contaminated shellfish results in a wide variety of symptoms, depending on the toxins present, their concentrations

2005 Allergy and Asthma Proceedings

93. Pacific ciguatoxin-1b effect over Na+ and K+ currents, inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate content and intracellular Ca2+ signals in cultured rat myotubes Full Text available with Trip Pro

Pacific ciguatoxin-1b effect over Na+ and K+ currents, inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate content and intracellular Ca2+ signals in cultured rat myotubes 1. The action of the main ciguatoxin involved in ciguatera fish poisoning in the Pacific region (P-CTX-1b) was studied in myotubes originated from rat skeletal muscle cells kept in primary culture. 2. The effect of P-CTX-1b on sodium currents at short times of exposure (up to 1 min) showed a moderate increase in peak Na+ current. During prolonged

2002 British journal of pharmacology

94. NEWS AND NOTES Full Text available with Trip Pro

NEWS AND NOTES 7191756 1981 01 26 2018 11 13 0007-1447 281 6245 1980 Oct 04 British medical journal Br Med J Ciguatera poisoning. 948-9 Tatnall F M FM Smith H G HG Welsby P D PD Turnbull P C PC eng Case Reports Journal Article England Br Med J 0372673 0007-1447 0 Marine Toxins 11050-21-8 Ciguatoxins AIM IM Animals Ciguatera Poisoning Ciguatoxins metabolism Fishes Humans Male Marine Toxins poisoning Middle Aged United Kingdom 1980 10 4 1980 10 4 0 1 1980 10 4 0 0 ppublish 7191756 PMC1714227

1980 British medical journal

95. Captain Cook on poison fish. (Abstract)

clinical poisonings after ingestion of two different species of fish. The clinical findings are described and likely represent ciguatera and tetrodotoxin poisonings. Mechanisms of these toxin's actions are discussed in light of more recent studies. (...) Captain Cook on poison fish. On his second voyage of discovery, Captain James Cook charted much of the South Pacific. The journey was long, from 1772 to 1775. During the exploration, the geographic, ethnographic, and scientific variety provided no shortage of work for the accompanying naturalists, astronomers, navigators, and painters. Culinary discoveries included new species of fish, many of which were sketched, dressed, and ultimately eaten. The examined journals and correspondence document

2005 Neurology

96. Neurotoxic marine poisoning. (Abstract)

Neurotoxic marine poisoning. Marine poisoning results from the ingestion of marine animals that contain toxic substances and causes substantial illness in coastal regions. Three main clinical syndromes of marine poisoning have important neurological symptoms-ciguatera, tetrodotoxin poisoning, and paralytic shellfish poisoning. Ciguatera is the commonest syndrome of marine poisoning and is characterised by moderate to severe gastrointestinal effects (vomiting, diarrhoea, and abdominal cramps (...) ) and neurological effects (myalgia, paraesthesia, cold allodynia, and ataxia), but is rarely lethal. Tetrodotoxin poisoning and paralytic shellfish poisoning are less common but have a higher fatality rate than ciguatera. Mild gastrointestinal effects and a descending paralysis are characteristic of these types of poisoning. In severe poisoning, paralysis rapidly progresses to respiratory failure. Diagnosis of all types of marine poisoning is made from the circumstances of ingestion (type of fish and location

2005 Lancet Neurology

97. Prevalence of chronic symptoms of ciguatera disease in French polynesian adults. (Abstract)

Prevalence of chronic symptoms of ciguatera disease in French polynesian adults. Ciguatera is a tropical disease caused by seafood poisoning, for which the duration of symptoms remains to be determined. The objectives of this prospective study were to determine the prevalence of symptoms at different time points and to identify factors associated with chronic symptoms observed in adults suffering from this disease. At the time of onset, we observed a dose-response relationship including (...) a strong association between the delay of appearance of symptoms and a severity index (P < 0.001). Our results confirmed the key role of fish organs in the risk of contracting a more severe form of ciguatera. In the chronic stage, only the severity score based on information recorded in the acute phase is related to the persistence of symptoms (P < 0.001). Our findings suggest that several symptoms observed in the acute phase of the disease are still experienced 15 days after onset. This supports

2007 American Journal of Tropical Medicine & Hygiene

98. Fish poisoning. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Fish poisoning. 7191755 1981 01 26 2018 11 13 0007-1447 281 6245 1980 Oct 04 British medical journal Br Med J Fish poisoning. 890 eng Editorial England Br Med J 0372673 0007-1447 AIM IM Animals Ciguatera Poisoning Fishes Humans Meat poisoning Shellfish Poisoning 1980 10 4 1980 10 4 0 1 1980 10 4 0 0 ppublish 7191755 PMC1714187 Lancet. 1968 Oct 5;2(7571):767-70 4175564 Lancet. 1968 Oct 5;2(7571):770-2 4175565

1980 British medical journal

99. Outbreak Bias in Illness Reporting and Case Confirmation in Ciguatera Fish Poisoning Surveillance in South Florida Full Text available with Trip Pro

Outbreak Bias in Illness Reporting and Case Confirmation in Ciguatera Fish Poisoning Surveillance in South Florida Ciguatera fish poisoning is a potentially life-threatening disease caused by eating coral reef fish contaminated with ciguatoxins and is the most common marine poisoning. However, existing surveillance systems capture few cases. To improve regional ciguatera surveillance in South Florida, this study compared ciguatera illnesses in the Florida Poison Information Center-Miami (FPICM (...) ) call database to ciguatera cases in the Florida Department of Health (FDOH) disease surveillance systems.Univariate and multivariate logistic regression were used to identify predictors of when FPICM reported ciguatera illnesses to FDOH and whether FDOH confirmed reported ciguatera cases.FPICM staff preferentially reported ciguatera illnesses that were of shorter duration (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 0.84 per additional illness day; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.74, 0.97); outbreak-associated (AOR

2006 Public Health Reports

100. Ciguatera Fish Poisoning, Canary Islands Full Text available with Trip Pro

Ciguatera Fish Poisoning, Canary Islands 16485501 2006 03 16 2018 11 13 1080-6040 11 12 2005 Dec Emerging infectious diseases Emerging Infect. Dis. Ciguatera fish poisoning, Canary Islands. 1981-2 Pérez-Arellano Jose-Luis JL Luzardo Octavio P OP Pérez Brito Ana A Hernández Cabrera Michele M Zumbado Manuel M Carranza Cristina C Angel-Moreno Alfonso A Dickey Robert W RW Boada Luis D LD eng Letter United States Emerg Infect Dis 9508155 1080-6040 11050-21-8 Ciguatoxins IM Animals Ciguatera (...) Poisoning diagnosis epidemiology Ciguatoxins analysis immunology Disease Outbreaks Humans Perciformes Seafood toxicity Spain epidemiology 2006 2 21 9 0 2006 3 17 9 0 2006 2 21 9 0 ppublish 16485501 PMC3367630 10.3201/eid1112.050393 Nat Toxins. 1999;7(4):157-65 10797644 Toxicon. 2001 Jan;39(1):97-106 10936626 J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry. 2001 Jan;70(1):4-8 11118239 N Engl J Med. 2001 Mar 1;344(9):692-3 11229348 Eur J Emerg Med. 2001 Dec;8(4):295-300 11785597 Toxicon. 2003 Nov;42(6):663-72 14602122 Rev

2005 Emerging Infectious Diseases

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