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Chronic Nonallergic Rhinitis

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61. Vasomotor Rhinitis

: Vasomotor Rhinitis , Nonallergic Rhinopathy , Idiopathic Nonallergic Rhinitis , Senile Rhinitis , Geriatric Rhinitis , Gustatory Rhinitis From Related Chapters II. Symptoms: Chronic (>3 months) Characteristics Allergic symptoms are typically absent (nasal, ocular or pharyngeal/palatal , sneezing, s) Wet or Dry Dry: Nasal obstruction, airway resistance and congestion Wet: predominates Mixed (congestion and ) Provocative (non-allergic triggers) Odors (e.g. perfumes, auto emissions, smoke) Spicy food (...) on the image (or right click) to open the source website in a new browser window. Related Studies (from Trip Database) Ontology: Rhinitis, Vasomotor (C0035460) Definition (MSH) A form of non-allergic rhinitis that is characterized by nasal congestion and posterior pharyngeal drainage. Definition (MSHCZE) Vazomotorická rýma – rýma (rhinopathia, ev. rhinitis vasomotorica) projevující se záchvaty řídké sekrece z nosu a jeho ucpáním. Připomíná alergickou rýmu, patogeneticky se však uplatňují vegetativní

2015 FP Notebook

62. Clara cell protein 16 and eosinophil cationic protein production in chronically inflamed sinonasal mucosa. (Abstract)

Clara cell protein 16 and eosinophil cationic protein production in chronically inflamed sinonasal mucosa. Clara cell protein 16 (CC16) is an anti-inflammatory protein mainly expressed in the epithelial cells in the upper and lower airways. Eosinophil cationic protein (ECP) is an important marker of eosinophil activity in chronic inflammatory sinonasal diseases. The aim of this study was to evaluate mucosal production of CC16 and ECP in patients with perennial allergic rhinitis (PAR (...) ), nonallergic and allergic patients with chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyposis (CRSwNP), before and after nasal corticosteroid administration.Twenty patients with PAR, 20 nonallergic CRSwNP patients, 20 allergic CRSwNP patients, and 20 healthy controls were included. Mucosal cytology samples were taken from all participants for quantification of eosinophils. CC16 and ECP levels were measured in the nasal secretion samples. The patients with chronic sinonasal inflammation were treated with fluticasone

2016 International forum of allergy & rhinology

63. Sinusitis, Chronic (Overview)

usually manifests differently from . Symptoms of chronic sinusitis include nasal stuffiness, postnasal drip, facial fullness, and malaise. (See Clinical Presentation.) Chronic sinusitis may be noninfectious and related to allergy, cystic fibrosis, gastroesophageal reflux, or exposure to environmental pollutants. [ , ] Allergic rhinitis, nonallergic rhinitis, anatomic obstruction in the ostiomeatal complex, and immunologic disorders are known risk factors for chronic sinusitis. (See Etiology.) Medical (...) To see complete information on Fungal Sinusitis, please go to the main article by clicking . Risk factors The following conditions and risk factors predispose patients to the development of chronic sinusitis: Anatomic abnormalities of the ostiomeatal complex (eg, septal deviation, concha bullosa, deviation of uncinate process, Haller cells) Allergic rhinitis Aspirin sensitivity Asthma Nasal polyps Nonallergic rhinitis (eg, vasomotor rhinitis, rhinitis medicamentosa, cocaine abuse) Defects

2014 eMedicine.com

64. Chronic Cough

of the oropharyngeal mucosa only suggest this as a cause. These findings are sensitive but not specific. [ ] PNDS has recently been broadened to UACS, referring to a myriad of rhinosinus conditions that are related to cough, [ ] including: PNDS Nonallergic rhinitis with eosinophilia (NARES) Occupational rhinitis Postinfectious rhinitis Rhinitis due to anatomic abnormalities Rhinitis due to physical or chemical irritants Rhinitis of pregnancy Vasomotor rhinitis UACS is considered the most common cause of chronic (...) has separated the upper and lower airways, with the upper airway being the domain of the otolaryngologist and the lower airway being the domain of the pulmonologist. Recent research that shows a high proportion of patients with asthma and coexisting allergic rhinitis has paved the way for the “one airway” theory, in which a continuum of inflammation that involves the entire airway can be thought of as the underlying mechanism for disorders that start from the nose and mouth and extend to the most

2014 eMedicine Surgery

65. Sinusitis, Chronic, Medical Treatment

sinusitis usually manifests differently from . Symptoms of chronic sinusitis include nasal stuffiness, postnasal drip, facial fullness, and malaise. (See Clinical Presentation.) Chronic sinusitis may be noninfectious and related to allergy, cystic fibrosis, gastroesophageal reflux, or exposure to environmental pollutants. [ , ] Allergic rhinitis, nonallergic rhinitis, anatomic obstruction in the ostiomeatal complex, and immunologic disorders are known risk factors for chronic sinusitis. (See Etiology (...) schenckii Alternaria species To see complete information on Fungal Sinusitis, please go to the main article by clicking . Risk factors The following conditions and risk factors predispose patients to the development of chronic sinusitis: Anatomic abnormalities of the ostiomeatal complex (eg, septal deviation, concha bullosa, deviation of uncinate process, Haller cells) Allergic rhinitis Aspirin sensitivity Asthma Nasal polyps Nonallergic rhinitis (eg, vasomotor rhinitis, rhinitis medicamentosa, cocaine

2014 eMedicine Surgery

66. Sinusitis, Chronic (Diagnosis)

sinusitis usually manifests differently from . Symptoms of chronic sinusitis include nasal stuffiness, postnasal drip, facial fullness, and malaise. (See Clinical Presentation.) Chronic sinusitis may be noninfectious and related to allergy, cystic fibrosis, gastroesophageal reflux, or exposure to environmental pollutants. [ , ] Allergic rhinitis, nonallergic rhinitis, anatomic obstruction in the ostiomeatal complex, and immunologic disorders are known risk factors for chronic sinusitis. (See Etiology (...) schenckii Alternaria species To see complete information on Fungal Sinusitis, please go to the main article by clicking . Risk factors The following conditions and risk factors predispose patients to the development of chronic sinusitis: Anatomic abnormalities of the ostiomeatal complex (eg, septal deviation, concha bullosa, deviation of uncinate process, Haller cells) Allergic rhinitis Aspirin sensitivity Asthma Nasal polyps Nonallergic rhinitis (eg, vasomotor rhinitis, rhinitis medicamentosa, cocaine

2014 eMedicine.com

67. Rhinitis

is classified as allergic or nonallergic. The cause of nonallergic rhinitis is usually viral, although irritants can cause it. Diagnosis is usually clinical. Treatment includes humidification of room air, sympathomimetic amines, and antihistamines. Bacterial superinfection requires appropriate antibiotic treatment. There are several forms of nonallergic rhinitis. For allergic rhinitis, see . Acute rhinitis Acute rhinitis, manifesting with edema and vasodilation of the nasal mucous membrane, rhinorrhea (...) rhinitis, is a chronic condition in which intermittent vascular engorgement of the nasal mucous membrane leads to watery rhinorrhea and sneezing. Etiology is uncertain, and no allergy can be identified. A dry atmosphere seems to aggravate the condition. Symptoms and Signs Acute rhinitis results in cough, low-grade fever, nasal congestion, rhinorrhea, and sneezing. Chronic rhinitis manifestations are similar to those of acute rhinitis, but in prolonged or severe cases, patients may also have thick, foul

2013 Merck Manual (19th Edition)

68. Study to Investigate Effects of CAL-263 in Subjects With Allergic Rhinitis Exposed to Allergen in an Environmental Chamber

a positive Radio Allergen Sorbent Test (class 2 or greater) for grass pollen during the previous 12 months or at screening Is otherwise healthy Is able to provide written informed consent Exclusion Criteria: Is a female of childbearing History of chronic nasal or upper respiratory tract symptoms or disorders other than allergic rhinitis History of nonallergic rhinitis, chronic sinusitis or severe asthma Has a nasal condition likely to affect the outcome of the study Is currently taking regular medication (...) about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contacts provided below. For general information, Layout table for eligibility information Ages Eligible for Study: 18 Years to 55 Years (Adult) Sexes Eligible for Study: All Accepts Healthy Volunteers: No Criteria Inclusion Criteria: Age >18 and <55 years Has a history of seasonal allergic rhinitis for at least 2 years Has sensitivity to grass pollen demonstrated by a positive response to skin prick testing Has

2010 Clinical Trials

69. Allergic and mixed rhinitis: Epidemiology and natural history. (Abstract)

Allergic and mixed rhinitis: Epidemiology and natural history. Allergic rhinitis (AR) is a prevalent chronic respiratory problem in the United States associated with significant comorbidities and health care costs. Recent surveys suggest that mixed rhinitis (MR), which refers to patients with nonallergic AR (NAR) and AR, is a specific rhinitis subtype that may represent between 50 and 70% of all AR patients although the true prevalence of these conditions has not been confirmed. It is important (...) to make a clear distinction between these chronic rhinitis (CR) phenotypes as symptom triggers; response to treatment and prevalence of comorbidities such as sinusitis may be significantly different. Incorporating patient centric questionnaires that can reliably characterize AR, MR, and NAR phenotypes will improve our ability to further investigate the natural history/epidemiology, mechanisms, and development of novel therapies for NAR-related CR subtypes.

2010 Allergy and Asthma Proceedings

70. Local production of IgE in the respiratory mucosa and the concept of entopy: does allergy exist in nonallergic rhinitis? (Abstract)

Local production of IgE in the respiratory mucosa and the concept of entopy: does allergy exist in nonallergic rhinitis? To review research regarding locally produced IgE and its impact on patients with chronic rhinitis.PubMed search with the following keywords: entopy, local IgE, nonallergic rhinitis, idiopathic rhinitis, vasomotor rhinitis, and allergic rhinitis.Articles were selected based on their relevance to entopy and locally produced IgE and its clinical effect and relationship (...) to idiopathic rhinitis (IR).Local IgE has been found in a variety of tissues, including nasal and bronchial mucosa. IgE is produced in these local tissues and not simply the product of migration to the tissue from regional lymphoid tissue or blood. Local IgE has been identified in most of both atopic and nonatopic asthmatic patients and allergic rhinitis patients. Up to 40% of patients with IR and a positive nasal provocation test result have evidence of locally produced IgE, which has been coined entopy

2010 Asthma & Immunology

71. Can early household exposure influence the development of rhinitis symptoms in infancy? Findings from the PARIS birth cohort. (Abstract)

Can early household exposure influence the development of rhinitis symptoms in infancy? Findings from the PARIS birth cohort. Allergic rhinitis (AR) has become the most prevalent chronic allergic disorder in childhood, and the role of environment has been questioned, particularly in early life.To investigate the risk factors for rhinitis symptoms in infants included in the PARIS (Pollution and Asthma Risk: an Infant Study) birth cohort.Infants were invited to participate at age 18 months (...) in a health examination conducted by a pediatrician. Allergic rhinitis was defined as the presence of rhinitis symptoms (runny nose, blocked nose, sneezing in the absence of a cold) combined with biological atopy (elevated total immunoglobulin E [IgE], specific IgE, or eosinophilia) and nonallergic rhinitis (NAR) as symptoms without biological atopy. Information about indoor exposures and lifestyle was collected during a telephone interview when the child was 1 month of age. Risk factors for AR and NAR

2011 Asthma & Immunology

72. Two-week comparison study of olopatadine hydrochloride nasal spray 0.6% versus azelastine hydrochloride nasal spray 0.1% in patients with vasomotor rhinitis. (Abstract)

Two-week comparison study of olopatadine hydrochloride nasal spray 0.6% versus azelastine hydrochloride nasal spray 0.1% in patients with vasomotor rhinitis. Olopatadine hydrochloride nasal spray 0.6% (OLO) and azelastine nasal spray 137 micrograms (AZE) are effective in treating allergic rhinitis and AZE is indicated for nonallergic vasomotor rhinitis (VMR). This study evaluates the relative safety and efficacy of OLO and AZE in patients with VMR. This randomized, double-blind, parallel-group (...) , multicenter study compared OLO (an investigational use) with AZE over 14 days in patients (n = 129) ≥12 years of age with chronic VMR. Efficacy included the severity of nasal symptom scores. Safety included adverse events (AEs) and nasal examinations. Patient perceptions of treatment satisfaction and changes in allergy condition were determined using the Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire for Medication and Patient Global Assessment scores. In the OLO and AZE groups, reflective scores for individual

2011 Allergy and Asthma Proceedings Controlled trial quality: uncertain

73. Role of rhinitis in laryngitis: another dimension of the unified airway. (Abstract)

Role of rhinitis in laryngitis: another dimension of the unified airway. We evaluated the prevalence of dysphonia and secondary laryngeal symptoms among patients with allergic rhinitis (AR), nonallergic rhinitis (NAR), and no rhinitis symptoms (controls).Patients with rhinitis symptoms with positive and negative allergy tests were recruited from allergy clinics, and patients without rhinitis symptoms were recruited from an orthopedic clinic. All groups completed the Voice-Related Quality (...) higher odds of dysphonia (odds ratio, 4.22; 95% confidence interval, 1.03 to 17.32). Patients with worse mini-RQLQ scores had lower VRQOL scores and higher RSI scores (Spearman correlation of -0.47 and p < 0.001 and Spearman correlation of 0.6 and p <0.001, respectively).Patients with rhinitis (AR or NAR) had a higher prevalence of dysphonia than did controls. Patients with worse rhinitis symptoms had worse voice-related quality of life and more severe chronic laryngeal symptoms.

2011 Rhinology and Laryngology

74. Low IgE concentration

and mercaptopurine. She was referred by ENT for evaluation for allergic rhinitis due to history of chronic nasal congestion. Skin prick testing was inconclusive due to poor histamine response, thus immunocap to aeroallergens was sent. Incidentally, her IgE level was found to be "<2 IU/mL". She denies history of frequent sinus infections, history of pneumonia or otitis media infections. My question is should she be worked for CVID (e.g. check immunoglobulin levels, vaccine response)? Could low IgE be due (...) isolated IgE deficiencies. Respiratory symptoms were equally common in IgE-deficient patients and in patients with normal to elevated IgE levels. IgE-deficient patients, however, were more likely to complain of arthralgias (P<.0001), chronic fatigue (P<.0001), and symptoms suggestive of airway infection (P = .0119). Compared with controls, patients with IgE deficiency had a higher prevalence of autoimmune disease (46% versus 15%) (P<.0001) and nonallergic reactive airway disease (73% versus 20%) (P

2020 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology - Ask the Expert

75. Diagnosis and treatment of respiratory illness in children and adults.

as initial treatment for allergic rhinitis in children and adults. Relevant Resources : Weiner, Abramson, & Puy, 1998 Acute Sinusitis Diagnosis Consensus Recommendation : To diagnose acute bacterial rhinosinusitis (ABRS), the ICSI work group consensus is there are two clinical presentations where ABRS has a higher likelihood of being present: Persistence of symptoms consistent with acute rhinosinusitis lasting 10 days or more without evidence of improvement Symptoms are worsening – new onset of fever (...) guideline document (see the "Guideline Availability" field): Main Algorithm Acute Pharyngitis Algorithm Non-Infectious Rhinitis Algorithm Acute Sinusitis Algorithm Respiratory illnesses: Viral upper-respiratory infection Acute pharyngitis Non-infectious rhinitis (allergic and nonallergic) Acute sinusitis Diagnosis Evaluation Management Treatment Allergy and Immunology Family Practice Infectious Diseases Internal Medicine Otolaryngology Pediatrics Advanced Practice Nurses Allied Health Personnel Health

2017 National Guideline Clearinghouse (partial archive)

76. Relationships among rhinitis, fibromyalgia, and chronic fatigue. (Abstract)

Relationships among rhinitis, fibromyalgia, and chronic fatigue. New information about the pathophysiology of idiopathic nonallergic rhinopathy indicates a high prevalence in chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). This article shows the relevance of CFS and allied disorders to allergy practice. CFS has significant overlap with systemic hyperalgesia (fibromyalgia), autonomic dysfunction (irritable bowel syndrome and migraine headaches), sensory hypersensitivity (dyspnea; congestion; rhinorrhea (...) ; and appreciation of visceral nociception in the esophagus, gastrointestinal tract, bladder, and other organs), and central nervous system maladaptations (central sensitization) recorded by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Neurological dysfunction may account for the overlap of CFS with idiopathic nonallergic rhinopathy. Scientific advances are in fMRI, nociceptive sensor expression, and, potentially, infection with xenotropic murine leukemia-related virus provide additional insights to novel

2010 Allergy and Asthma Proceedings

77. Evaluation Effects of Nasal Nitric Oxide Measurements Are Associated With Atopy Status in Chronic Nasal Inflammation

of atopic status on nNO in nasal inflammatory diseases has not been reported. The aim of our study was to determine the value of nNO in patients with chronic nasal inflammation, and to assess the relationship between nNO and atopic status in these patients. A total of 131 randomized patients suffering form chronic nonallergic nasal inflammation and 20 healthy volunteers were finally recruited. nNO was measured by NIOX devices. Sinus computed tomography (CT) scan, nasal endoscope and nasal symptoms (...) evaluation were used in the different diagnosis of chronic rhinitis (CR), CRS without nasal polyps (CRSsNP) and CRS with nasal polyps (CRSwNP). Atopic status was confirmed by skin prick test and serum IgE levels. Blood eosinophils were evaluated simultaneously. Relationships among nNO, various atopic characteristics and chronic nasal inflammation were evaluated. Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Hypersensitivity Rhinitis Respiratory Tract Diseases Nasal Polyps Nitric Oxide Device: nasal nitric

2011 Clinical Trials

78. Evaluation and Management of Asthma in the Elderly

available Generally useful tool to assess asthma severity Bronchodilator responsiveness May be less pronounced Variable but generally greater eNO May be useful May be useful Methacholine challenge Less often used because of more frequent contraindications (e.g., cardiovascular disease) Useful; overall fewer contraindications Atopy Less common Common Comorbidities COPD, heart disease more common Allergic rhinitis more common Phenotypes Limited knowledge, but late-onset asthma, long-standing asthma (...) novel allergic and nonallergic models of asthma, re?ecting altered immune cell and cytokine milieu of the aging lung. Translation of aged animal studies to human studies. Establish biobanks of lung tissue, sputum, blood, and other samples fromoldersubjectswithandwithout asthma. Asthma phenotypes Lack of uniform de?nitions and incomplete characterization of longstanding versus late-onset AIE Generally not accomplished. Staphylococcal enterotoxin has been identi?ed as a potential risk factor for late

2016 American Thoracic Society

79. Adult Sinusitis Full Text available with Trip Pro

nonallergic rhinitis, vasomotor rhinitis, invasive fungal rhinosinusitis, allergic fungal rhinosinusitis, vascular headaches, and migraines. Similarly, the guideline will not consider management of rhinosinusitis in patients with the following modifying factors but will discuss the importance of assessing patients with recurrent ARS or CRS for their presence: cystic fibrosis, immotile cilia disorders, ciliary dyskinesia, immune deficiency, prior history of sinus surgery, and anatomic abnormalities (eg (...) , deviated nasal septum). Surgical management of CRS is not discussed in this guideline because of insufficient evidence (eg, randomized controlled trials) for evidence-based recommendations. Burden of Rhinosinusitis Twelve percent of the US population (nearly 1 in 8 adults) reported being diagnosed with rhinosinusitis in the prior 12 months in a 2012 national health survey. Rhinosinusitis was diagnosed more frequently than hay fever (7%), bronchitis (4%), or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (4

2015 American Academy of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery

80. Microbiota Composition and the Integration of Exogenous and Endogenous Signals in Reactive Nasal Inflammation Full Text available with Trip Pro

Microbiota Composition and the Integration of Exogenous and Endogenous Signals in Reactive Nasal Inflammation The prevalence of reactive nasal inflammatory conditions, for example, allergic rhinitis and chronic rhinosinusitis, is steadily increasing in parallel with significant environmental changes worldwide. Allergens and as yet undefined environmental agents may trigger these conditions via the involvement of host intrinsic factors, including the innate and adaptive immune system, the nasal (...) epithelium, and the nasal nervous system. The critical role of the nasal microbiota in coordinating these components has emerged in recent studies documenting a significant association between microbial composition and the onset and progression of allergic or nonallergic inflammation. It is now clear that the local microbiota is a major player in the development of the mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue and in the regulation of such adaptive responses as IgA production and the function of effector

2018 Journal of immunology research

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