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Chloral Hydrate

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1. Chloral hydrate as a sedating agent for neurodiagnostic procedures in children. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Chloral hydrate as a sedating agent for neurodiagnostic procedures in children. Paediatric neurodiagnostic investigations, including brain neuroimaging and electroencephalography (EEG), play an important role in the assessment of neurodevelopmental disorders. The use of an appropriate sedative agent is important to ensure the successful completion of the neurodiagnostic procedures, particularly in children, who are usually unable to remain still throughout the procedure.To assess (...) the effectiveness and adverse effects of chloral hydrate as a sedative agent for non-invasive neurodiagnostic procedures in children.We used the standard search strategy of the Cochrane Epilepsy Group. We searched MEDLINE (OVID SP) (1950 to July 2017), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (the Cochrane Library, Issue 7, 2017), Embase (1980 to July 2017), and the Cochrane Epilepsy Group Specialized Register (via CENTRAL) using a combination of keywords and MeSH headings.We included

2017 Cochrane

3. Short-term effects of single-dose chloral hydrate on neonatal auditory perception: An auditory event-related potential study. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Short-term effects of single-dose chloral hydrate on neonatal auditory perception: An auditory event-related potential study. To study the short-term effects of a single-dose chloral hydrate on neonatal auditory perception by measuring auditory event-related potentials (aERPs).Thirty-nine full-term neonates, aged 2-28 days and weighing 2980-4350 g, were divided into two groups including a chloral hydrate group (CH group, n = 17) and a non-chloral hydrate control group (non-CH group, n = 22 (...) ). The CH group was given single-dose chloral hydrate (30 mg/kg) orally before aERPs measurement. An auditory oddball paradigm was used to elicit aERPs. P2 and N2 components of the ERP were recorded from electrodes at the Fz and Cz locations, and the areas under their curves (P2 and N2 areas) were calculated for the comparison between two groups.Significant differences was found in the P2 area between the two groups at Fz and Cz (Fz: F (1,37) = 487.75, P < 0.05; Cz: F (1,37) = 1465.94, P < 0.05

2019 PLoS ONE

4. Safety and effectiveness of chloral hydrate in outpatient paediatric sedation for objective hearing tests. (Abstract)

Safety and effectiveness of chloral hydrate in outpatient paediatric sedation for objective hearing tests. Chloral hydrate is a sedative that has been used for many years in clinical practice and, under proper conditions, gives a deep and long enough sleep to allow performance of objective hearing tests in young children. The reluctance to use this substance stems from side effects reported over time that can vary, depending on dose, procedure settings and immediate life supporting intervention (...) when needed. Our study adds to those that have appeared in recent years, showing that chloral hydrate is an effective and safe substance when is used in proper conditions.The study included 322 children who needed sedation for objective hearing tests, from April 2014 to March 2018. Parents were instructed to bring the child tired and fasted for at least 2 h before sedation. The sedative was administered by trained staff in the hospital, and the child was monitored until awaking.In our study group

2019 International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology

5. Comparison of intranasal midazolam, intranasal ketamine, and oral chloral hydrate for conscious sedation during paediatric echocardiography: results of a prospective randomised study. (Abstract)

Comparison of intranasal midazolam, intranasal ketamine, and oral chloral hydrate for conscious sedation during paediatric echocardiography: results of a prospective randomised study. There are several agents used for conscious sedation by various routes in children. The aim of this prospective randomised study is to compare the effectiveness of three commonly used sedatives: intranasal ketamine, intranasal midazolam, and oral chloral hydrate for children undergoing transthoracic (...) echocardiography.Children who were referred to paediatric cardiology due to a heart murmur for transthoracic echocardiography were prospectively randomised into three groups. Seventy-three children received intranasal midazolam (0.2 mg/kg), 72 children received intranasal ketamine (4 mg/kg), and 72 children received oral chloral hydrate (50 mg/kg) for conscious sedation. The effects of three agents were evaluated in terms of intensity, onset, and duration of sedation. Obtaining high-quality transthoracic

2019 Cardiology in the young Controlled trial quality: uncertain

6. Safety of chloral hydrate oral solution for sedation in pediatrics: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Safety of chloral hydrate oral solution for sedation in pediatrics: a systematic review and meta-analysis Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external websites. Email salutation (e.g. "Dr Smith" or "Joanne") for correspondence: Organisation web

2018 PROSPERO

7. Efficacy of chloral hydrate oral solution for sedation in pediatrics: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Efficacy of chloral hydrate oral solution for sedation in pediatrics: a systematic review and meta-analysis Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external websites. Email salutation (e.g. "Dr Smith" or "Joanne") for correspondence: Organisation

2018 PROSPERO

8. The cost-effectiveness of clinic-based chloral hydrate sedation versus general anaesthesia for paediatric ophthalmological procedures

The cost-effectiveness of clinic-based chloral hydrate sedation versus general anaesthesia for paediatric ophthalmological procedures The cost-effectiveness of clinic-based chloral hydrate sedation versus general anaesthesia for paediatric ophthalmological procedures The cost-effectiveness of clinic-based chloral hydrate sedation versus general anaesthesia for paediatric ophthalmological procedures Burnett H, Lambley R, West S, Ungar WJ, Mireskandari K Record Status This is a bibliographic (...) record of a published health technology assessment. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation Burnett H, Lambley R, West S, Ungar WJ, Mireskandari K. The cost-effectiveness of clinic-based chloral hydrate sedation versus general anaesthesia for paediatric ophthalmological procedures. Toronto: Technology Assessment at SickKids (TASK). 2014 Authors' objectives The primary objective was to determine the incremental cost of paediatric eye examinations

2014 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.

9. A randomized controlled trial of oral chloral hydrate vs intranasal dexmedetomidine plus buccal midazolam for auditory brainstem response testing in children. (Abstract)

A randomized controlled trial of oral chloral hydrate vs intranasal dexmedetomidine plus buccal midazolam for auditory brainstem response testing in children. Moderate to deep sedation is required for an auditory brainstem response test when high-intensity stimulation is used. Chloral hydrate is the most commonly used sedative, whereas intranasal dexmedetomidine is increasingly used in pediatric non-painful procedural sedations.The aim of this study was to compare the sedation success rate (...) after oral chloral hydrate at 50 mg kg-1 and intranasal dexmedetomidine at 3 μg kg-1 plus buccal midazolam at 0.1 mg kg-1 for an auditory brainstem response test.Children who required an auditory brainstem response test were recruited and randomly assigned to receive oral chloral hydrate at 50 mg kg-1 and intranasal placebo, or intranasal dexmedetomidine at 3 μg kg-1 with buccal midazolam 0.1 mg kg-1 . The primary outcome was the rate of successful sedation for auditory brainstem response

2018 Paediatric anaesthesia Controlled trial quality: predicted high

10. Comparison of sedation by intranasal dexmedetomidine and oral chloral hydrate for pediatric ophthalmic examination. (Abstract)

Comparison of sedation by intranasal dexmedetomidine and oral chloral hydrate for pediatric ophthalmic examination. Pediatric ophthalmic examinations can be conducted under sedation either by chloral hydrate or by dexmedetomidine. The objective was to compare the success rates and quality of ophthalmic examination of children sedated by intranasal dexmedetomidine vs oral chloral hydrate.One hundred and forty-one children aged from 3 to 36 months (5-15 kg) scheduled to ophthalmic examinations (...) were randomly sedated by either intranasal dexmedetomidine (2 μg·kg-1 , n = 71) or oral chloral hydrate (80 mg·kg-1 , n = 70). The primary endpoint was successful sedation to complete the examinations including slit-lamp photography, tonometry, anterior segment analysis, and refractive error inspection. The secondary endpoints included quality of eye position, intraocular pressure, onset time, duration of examination, recovery time, discharge time, any side effects during examination, and within 48

2018 Paediatric anaesthesia Controlled trial quality: uncertain

11. Differential modulation of the auditory steady state response and inhibitory gating by chloral hydrate anesthesia Full Text available with Trip Pro

Differential modulation of the auditory steady state response and inhibitory gating by chloral hydrate anesthesia Auditory steady state response (ASSR) and inhibitory gating (IG) are electrophysiological examinations commonly used to evaluate the sensory and cognitive functions of the brain. In some clinic examinations and animal experiments, general anesthesia is necessary to conduct electrophysiological recordings. However, the effects of anesthesia on ASSR and IG remain unclear (...) . For this reason, we recorded local field potentials though electrodes implanted in different brain areas of rats: the auditory cortex (AC), hippocampus (HC), amygdala (AMY), and prefrontal cortex (PFC), and compared the characteristics of ASSR and IG under anesthetized and conscious conditions. We found that ASSR signals were the strongest in the AC, and decreased sequentially in the HP, AMY, and PFC. Chloral hydrate anesthesia significantly reduced the power and phase-locking of ASSR in the AC, HP, and AMY

2018 Scientific reports

12. Comparison of sedative effects of oral midazolam/chloral hydrate and midazolam/promethazine in pediatric dentistry Full Text available with Trip Pro

Comparison of sedative effects of oral midazolam/chloral hydrate and midazolam/promethazine in pediatric dentistry Background. The aim of this investigation was to compare the sedative effects of oral midazolam/chloral hydrate and midazolam/promethazine combinations on fearful children needing dental treatment. Methods. This crossover double-blind clinical trial was conducted on 30 children aged 2‒6 years, who had at least two similar teeth needing pulp treatment. Standard vital signs were (...) recorded before and after premedication. Wilson sedation scale was used to judge the level of sedation. Cases were divided into two groups based on the sequence of medication received. This was to overcome the sequence effect. Group I received oral midazolam (0.4 mg/kg/chloral hydrate (50 mg/kg) at the first visit while they received midazolam (0.4 mg/kg)/promethazine (5 mg/kg) in their second visit. Group II received the premedication in the opposite sequence. The operator and child were blinded

2018 Journal of dental research, dental clinics, dental prospects Controlled trial quality: uncertain

13. Effect of Chloral Hydrate Sedation on Intraocular Pressure in a Pediatric Population. (Abstract)

Effect of Chloral Hydrate Sedation on Intraocular Pressure in a Pediatric Population. To determine the effect of oral chloral hydrate (CH) sedation on intraocular pressure (IOP) in an outpatient pediatric population.Prospective, noncomparative case series.Children aged 1 month to 5 years undergoing CH sedation for ocular imaging/evaluation at a tertiary eye hospital were included. IOP was measured using an Icare tonometer prior to sedation (in some, not all), at 25 minutes after sedation

2018 American Journal of Ophthalmology

14. Chloral hydrate administered by a dedicated sedation service can be used safely and effectively for pediatric ophthalmic examination. (Abstract)

Chloral hydrate administered by a dedicated sedation service can be used safely and effectively for pediatric ophthalmic examination. To determine safety and efficacy of oral chloral hydrate sedation (CHS) for outpatient pediatric ophthalmic procedures.Prospective, interventional case series.Setting: King Khaled Eye Specialist Hospital.Children aged 1 month to 5 years undergoing CHS for ocular imaging/evaluation.Details on chloral hydrate dose administered, sedation achieved, vital signs (...) , and adverse events were recorded.Primary outcome was percentage of patients with a sedation level ≥ 4 at 45 minutes post chloral hydrate administration. Secondary outcomes were time from sedation to discharge and adverse events, including changes in vital signs following chloral hydrate administration.A total of 324 children were recruited with a mean age of 2.2 (SD: 1.3) years and mean weight of 10.9 (SD: 3.3) kg. Adequate sedation was obtained with a mean chloral hydrate first dose of 77.4 (SD: 14.7) mg

2018 American Journal of Ophthalmology

15. Comparison of rescue techniques for failed chloral hydrate sedation for magnetic resonance imaging scans--additional chloral hydrate vs intranasal dexmedetomidine. (Abstract)

Comparison of rescue techniques for failed chloral hydrate sedation for magnetic resonance imaging scans--additional chloral hydrate vs intranasal dexmedetomidine. Chloral hydrate, a commonly used sedative in children during noninvasive diagnostic procedures, is associated with side effects like prolonged sedation, paradoxical excitement, delirium, and unpleasant taste. Dexmedetomidine, a highly selective α-2 agonist, has better pharmacokinetic properties than chloral hydrate. We conducted (...) this prospective, double-blind, randomized controlled trial to evaluate efficacy of intranasal dexmedetomidine with that of a second oral dose of chloral hydrate for rescue sedation during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies in infants.One hundred and fifty infants (age group: 1-6 months), who were not adequately sedated after initial oral dose of 50 mg · kg(-1) chloral hydrate, were randomly divided into three groups with the following protocol for each group. Group C: second oral dose chloral hydrate 25

2016 Paediatric anaesthesia Controlled trial quality: predicted high

16. Chloral hydrate or midazolam: which is better for sedating children for painless diagnostic imaging?

Chloral hydrate or midazolam: which is better for sedating children for painless diagnostic imaging? BestBets: Chloral hydrate or midazolam: which is better for sedating children for painless diagnostic imaging? Chloral hydrate or midazolam: which is better for sedating children for painless diagnostic imaging? Report By: Dr Michelle Hare - Consultant in Paediatrics Institution: Sheffield Children's Hospital, Western Bank, Sheffield, South Yorkshire, UK Date Submitted: 14th September 2012 Last (...) Modified: 14th September 2012 Status: Green (complete) Three Part Question In [children who require sedation for painless diagnostic imaging] is [chloral hydrate better than midazolam] in achieving [effective and safe sedation]? Clinical Scenario A 2-year-old child is acutely admitted at night to a district general hospital following a prolonged focal seizure. A CT scan of the head without sedation fails as the child is too active and distressed, and as the on-call paediatric registrar, you

2012 BestBETS

17. Safety and efficacy of chloral hydrate for conscious sedation of infants in the pediatric cardiovascular intensive care unit. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Safety and efficacy of chloral hydrate for conscious sedation of infants in the pediatric cardiovascular intensive care unit. This study evaluates the safety and efficacy of chloral hydrate administration for the conscious sedation of infants in the pediatric cardiovascular intensive care unit (PCICU).We conducted a retrospective review of the charts of 165 infants with congenital heart disease who received chloral hydrate in our PCICU between January 2014 and December 2014. Chloral hydrate (...) no clinically significant changes in heart rate, mean arterial pressure, respiratory rate, or peripheral oxygen saturation before, during, or after use of the chloral hydrate. There were no significant differences regarding sedative effects in the subgroups (cyanotic vs acyanotic group, with pulmonary infection vs without pulmonary infection group, and with pulmonary hypertension vs without pulmonary hypertension group).Our experience suggests that chloral hydrate is a safe and efficacious agent

2017 Medicine

18. Safety and efficacy of chloral hydrate for procedural sedation in paediatric ophthalmology: a systematic review and meta-analysis. (Abstract)

Safety and efficacy of chloral hydrate for procedural sedation in paediatric ophthalmology: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Although chloral hydrate (CH) has been used as a sedative for decades, it is not widely accepted as a valid choice for ophthalmic examinations in uncooperative children. This study aimed to systematically review the literature on the drug's safety and efficacy.We searched PubMed, EMBASE, ISI Web of Science, Scopus, CENTRAL, Google Scholar and Trip database to 1 (...) October 2015, using the keywords 'chloral hydrate', 'paediatric' and 'procedural sedation OR diagnostic sedation'. A meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials (RCTs) was performed.A total of 6961 articles were screened and 104 were included in the review. Thirteen of these concerned paediatric ophthalmic examination, while 13 others were RCTs and were meta-analysed. CH was reported to have been administered in a total of 24 265 sedation episodes in children aged from <1 month to 18 years. The meta

2017 The British journal of ophthalmology

19. Comparison Between Oral and Enema of Chloral Hydrate

Comparison Between Oral and Enema of Chloral Hydrate Comparison Between Oral and Enema of Chloral Hydrate - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. Comparison Between Oral and Enema of Chloral Hydrate (...) to Brief Summary: To compare the clinical sedative effect and safety using 10% chloral hydrate during ophthalmic examinations for oral vs enema group.The patients were randomly divided into two groups (oral group and enema group) using a computer random number generator with a 1:1 allocation (simple randomization, odd number for oral group and even number for enema group). Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase Congenital Cataract Drug: oral chloral hydrate Drug: enema chloral hydrate

2017 Clinical Trials

20. The Effect of Oral Midazolam and Chloral Hydrate Before Echocardiography in Pediatric Patients: A Randomized Double-Blind Clinical Trial Full Text available with Trip Pro

The Effect of Oral Midazolam and Chloral Hydrate Before Echocardiography in Pediatric Patients: A Randomized Double-Blind Clinical Trial This study aimed to compare the effects of oral midazolam and chloral hydrate in pre-echocardiography sedation of children. In this double-blind clinical trial, 68 children were randomly assigned to midazolam (0.2 mg/kg) or chloral hydrate (50 mg/kg). The intensity, duration, and onset of the drugs' effects were assessed. Data were analyzed using the χ2 (...) and Mann-Whitney tests (P ≤ .05). The average onset and duration of sedation in the children assigned to midazolam was shorter than in those assigned chloral hydrate (6.35 ± 3.65 and 19.14 ± 5.86 minutes, P = .0001, and 27.64 ± 8.34 and 48.97 ± 14.81 minutes, P = .0001). Gastrointestinal side effects were more frequent in the chloral hydrate group (23.5% against 0%, P = .003). According to the results of the present study, chloral hydrate and midazolam can be appropriate choices for pre

2017 Global pediatric health Controlled trial quality: uncertain

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