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Child Safety Seat

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1. Use of child safety seats during transportation of newborns (PubMed)

Use of child safety seats during transportation of newborns Child safety seats (CSS) are critical for the protection of children, in case of motor vehicle accidents. Although the national legislation mandates that all newborns must be placed in an appropriately installed CSS during transportation, people often do not perceive the importance of CSS and do not use it as recommended. The purpose of this survey was to understand the use of CSS for the safe transport of newborns from hospital

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2018 Korean journal of pediatrics

2. Newborn Parent Based Intervention to Increase Child Safety Seat Use. (PubMed)

Newborn Parent Based Intervention to Increase Child Safety Seat Use. This paper intends to assess the effect of a maternity department intervention on improvement of knowledge and use of child safety seats (CSS) among newborn parents. An intervention study included three groups (one education plus free CSS intervention group, one education only group, and one control group). The participants were parents of newborns in the maternity department of two hospitals. Both of the intervention groups (...) received a folded pamphlet of child passenger safety, a height chart and standardized safety education during their hospital stay after giving birth. The education plus free CSS intervention group received an additional free CSS and professional installation training at hospital discharge. The control group received a pamphlet with educational information about nutrition and food safety. Three months after enrollment, a telephone follow-up was conducted among participants in the three groups. Data

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2016 International journal of environmental research and public health

3. Child Safety Seat

Child Safety Seat Child Safety Seat Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Child Safety Seat Child Safety Seat Aka: Child (...) Safety Seat , Child Car Restraint , Car Seat From Related Chapters II. Epidemiology Use per National Traffic Safety Administration (NTSA) Children under age 5 are unrestrained in 51% of cases Safety seats are misused in 80% of cases Child Safety Seat efficacy in s Car Seats reduce infant deaths by 71% Car Seats reduce toddler deaths by 54% s serious injury risk in ages 4-8 years old by 45% Reduces hospitalization by 69% Non-MVA related injuries occur when Car Seats are used for unintended purposes

2018 FP Notebook

4. “He’s the Number One Thing in My World”: Application of the PRECEDE-PROCEED Model to Explore Child Car Seat Use in a Regional Community in New South Wales (PubMed)

seat than were older children aged 4-5 years (60% versus 95%: χ² = 19.14, p < 0.001). Focus group participants highlighted how important their child's safety was to them, spoke of the influence grandparents had on their use of child car seats and voiced mixed views on the value of authorised child car seat fitters. Future programs should include access to affordable car seats and target community members as well as parents with clear, consistent messages highlighting the safety benefits of using (...) “He’s the Number One Thing in My World”: Application of the PRECEDE-PROCEED Model to Explore Child Car Seat Use in a Regional Community in New South Wales We explored the factors influencing the use of age-appropriate car seats in a community with a high proportion of Aboriginal families in regional New South Wales. We conducted a survey and three focus groups with parents of children aged 3-5 years enrolled at three early learning centres on the Australian south-east coast. Survey data

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2017 International journal of environmental research and public health

5. Rear-Facing Car Safety Seat Use for Children 18 Months of Age: Prevalence and Determinants. (PubMed)

reported having discussed car seats with their child's provider (aOR 1.7; 95% CI 1.1-2.6); receiving their child's primary care in pediatrics compared with family practice clinics (aOR 2.4; 95% CI 1.1-2.6); and being aware of the American Academy of Pediatrics rear-facing recommendation (aOR 2.8; 95% CI 1.8-4.1) were significantly more likely to report rear-facing car safety seat use. Conversely, caregivers who previously used a car seat with another child were less likely to have their child rear (...) Rear-Facing Car Safety Seat Use for Children 18 Months of Age: Prevalence and Determinants. To examine the prevalence and potential determinants of rear-facing car safety seat use among children approximately 18 months of age born at a university hospital.We administered a telephone survey to caregivers of children 17-19 months of age who were born between November 2013 and May 2014. The survey was designed to assess the prevalence of rear-facing car safety seat use and estimate the likelihood

2017 Journal of Pediatrics

6. Retraction: Car safety seats for children: rear facing for best protection (PubMed)

Retraction: Car safety seats for children: rear facing for best protection 29374082 2018 10 30 1475-5785 24 1 2018 02 Injury prevention : journal of the International Society for Child and Adolescent Injury Prevention Inj. Prev. Retraction: Car safety seats for children: rear facing for best protection . e2 10.1136/ip.2006.015115ret Henary B B Center for Applied Biomechanics, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, USA. Sherwood C P CP Center for Applied Biomechanics, University

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2017 Injury Prevention

7. Expression of concern: car safety seats for children: rear facing for best protection (PubMed)

Expression of concern: car safety seats for children: rear facing for best protection 28667167 2018 06 26 1475-5785 23 4 2017 08 Injury prevention : journal of the International Society for Child and Adolescent Injury Prevention Inj. Prev. Expression of concern: car safety seats for children: rear facing for best protection. e1 10.1136/ip.2006.015115eoc1 eng Letter Expression of Concern 2017 06 30 England Inj Prev 9510056 1353-8047 Inj Prev. 2007 Dec;13(6):398-402 18056317 amputation concussion

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2017 Injury Prevention

8. Child Convertible Car Seat

Convertible Car Seat Aka: Child Convertible Car Seat , Convertible Child Seat From Related Chapters II. Indications Infants (rear facing until age 2 years and 20 pounds) Children (forward facing) Used up to 40 pounds and 4 years old Childs ear level should be below top of seat III. Types: Convertible Car Seats Five Point Harness (preferred for safety) Five straps: 2 , 2 leg, 1 crotch Best protection against for all children Best fit of convertible s for small infants T-Shield Plastic T-shaped yoke buckles (...) search on the term "Child Convertible Car Seat." Click on the image (or right click) to open the source website in a new browser window. Related Studies (from Trip Database) Related Topics in Safety About FPnotebook.com is a rapid access, point-of-care medical reference for primary care and emergency clinicians. Started in 1995, this collection now contains 6656 interlinked topic pages divided into a tree of 31 specialty books and 728 chapters. Content is with systematic literature reviews

2018 FP Notebook

9. The influence of parental education and other socio-economic factors on child car seat use (PubMed)

The influence of parental education and other socio-economic factors on child car seat use The behaviour of parents in ensuring car passenger safety for their children is associated with socio-economic (SE) status of the family; however, the influence of parental education has rarely been researched and the findings are contradictory. The aim of the study was to clarify whether parental education influences the use of a child car seat during short rides.A cross-sectional survey was carried out (...) be included in individually tailored safety counselling programmes. SE inequalities could be further reduced with provision of free child car seats for eligible families.

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2016 Slovenian Journal of Public Health

10. Overcoming barriers to use of child car seats in an urban Aboriginal community—formative evaluation of a program for Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services (PubMed)

to assess process issues and acceptability with 13 staff members.Parents and carers in the focus groups reported a lack of awareness of child car seat use, confusion about the right car seats for different aged children but agreed about the importance of safety and community responsibility to keep children safe in cars. Interviews with service staff informed an approach to deliver relevant information. Information and resources were delivered to families, while the car seat distribution scheme supplied (...) Overcoming barriers to use of child car seats in an urban Aboriginal community—formative evaluation of a program for Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services Little is known about the barriers to use of child car seats in Australian Aboriginal communities, or the acceptability of programs to increase appropriate car seat use. This formative evaluation sought to consult and partner with Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services (ACCHS) to develop and evaluate the feasibility

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2018 Pilot and feasibility studies

11. Comparison of the effectiveness of hands-on versus online education in child passenger safety. (PubMed)

Comparison of the effectiveness of hands-on versus online education in child passenger safety. Community paediatricians' knowledge of appropriate child safety seat (CSS) use in vehicles may be inadequate. We compared the effectiveness of hands-on and online education in improving and retaining child passenger safety (CPS) knowledge and skills among paediatric trainees.Paediatric trainees were randomised to receive hands-on skills training versus a 1-hour online module in CPS. CSS knowledge (...) ; online=1.1 (95% CI 0.7 to 1.6), p<0.0001) with the hands-on group scores significantly better than the online group (p<0.02). The long-term gain in knowledge scores was not significantly different between groups (p=0.12).Baseline CSS installation skill scores did not significantly differ between groups for forward-facing seats (p=0.16) and rear-facing seats (p=0.51). At follow-up, mean CSS installation skill scores significantly increased for the hands-on group (forward-facing seat: 0.8 (95% CI 0.16

2018 Injury prevention : journal of the International Society for Child and Adolescent Injury Prevention

12. Child Car Safety: A Parental Survey at a Tertiary Care Emergency Treatment Center in Greece. (PubMed)

routine conditions and declined even further under emergency circumstances. Most children younger than 2 years and older than 4 years traveled inappropriately restrained in a forward-facing restraint seat. Parents should be more intensively educated on child car safety seat and the proper CRS use. (...) Child Car Safety: A Parental Survey at a Tertiary Care Emergency Treatment Center in Greece. This study aimed to assess parental behavior in terms of child restraint systems (CRS) use under emergency conditions while driving to the hospital's outpatient settings as well as their routine child car safety (CCS) practices.A cross-sectional survey of parents/caregivers transporting children 13 years or younger was conducted at the Emergency Treatment Center of a pediatric tertiary care center

2018 Pediatric Emergency Care

13. Child Passenger Safety. (PubMed)

Child Passenger Safety. Child passenger safety has dramatically evolved over the past decade; however, motor vehicle crashes continue to be the leading cause of death for children 4 years and older. This policy statement provides 4 evidence-based recommendations for best practices in the choice of a child restraint system to optimize safety in passenger vehicles for children from birth through adolescence: (1) rear-facing car safety seats as long as possible; (2) forward-facing car safety seats (...) from the time they outgrow rear-facing seats for most children through at least 4 years of age; (3) belt-positioning booster seats from the time they outgrow forward-facing seats for most children through at least 8 years of age; and (4) lap and shoulder seat belts for all who have outgrown booster seats. In addition, a fifth evidence-based recommendation is for all children younger than 13 years to ride in the rear seats of vehicles. It is important to note that every transition is associated

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2018 Pediatrics

14. The impact of child safety restraint legislation on child injuries in police-reported motor vehicle collisions in British Columbia: An interrupted time series analysis (PubMed)

The impact of child safety restraint legislation on child injuries in police-reported motor vehicle collisions in British Columbia: An interrupted time series analysis Motor vehicle collisions (MVCs) remain a leading cause of death and serious injury in Canadian children. In July 2008, British Columbia introduced child safety seat legislation that aimed to reduce the number of children killed or injured in MVCs. This legislation upgraded previous child seat legislation (introduced in 1985 (...) provide evidence that British Columbia's new child safety restraint law was associated with fewer injuries among children covered by the new laws.

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2016 Paediatrics & child health

15. Evaluating a smartphone application to improve child passenger safety and fire safety knowledge and behaviour. (PubMed)

) restraining the child in the back seat of the car; (3) buckling the child up for every ride; (4) having the restraint inspected by a child passenger safety technician; (5) having a working smoke alarm on every level of the home; (6) having hard-wired or lithium battery smoke alarms; (7) having and (8) practising a fire escape plan.Finding ways to communicate with parents about child passenger and fire safety continues to be a research priority. This study will contribute to the evidence about how (...) Evaluating a smartphone application to improve child passenger safety and fire safety knowledge and behaviour. Although proven measures for reducing injury due to motor vehicle collision and residential fires exist, the number of families properly and consistently using child passenger restraints and smoke alarms remains low. This paper describes the design of the Safety In Seconds (SIS) 2.0 study, which aims to evaluate the impact of a smartphone app on parents' use of child restraints

2016 Injury prevention : journal of the International Society for Child and Adolescent Injury Prevention

16. Child Passenger Safety Technician Consultation in the Pediatric Primary Care Setting. (PubMed)

Child Passenger Safety Technician Consultation in the Pediatric Primary Care Setting. Correct use of a child safety seat (CSS) can reduce the risk of fatal motor vehicle crash-related injury by up to 71%; however, misuse rates for CSS are as high as 70%. We recruited 189 caregivers at 2 large suburban pediatric office practices; 94 in the intervention group and 95 in the control group. All participants completed a baseline survey and received a CSS safety brochure. Intervention participants had (...) their CSS installation checked at enrollment by a certified child passenger safety (CPS) technician. Follow-up was conducted 4 months post enrollment. Intervention group participants had a 21.3% reduction in critical misuse at follow-up, whereas control participants critical misuse rate at follow-up was identical to the intervention group at baseline. A consult with a certified CPS technician, at the time of a routine visit to the pediatrician, resulted in a reduction in CSS misuse rates.

2017 Clinical pediatrics

17. Child Passenger Safety in the Somali Communities of Columbus, Ohio (PubMed)

Child Passenger Safety in the Somali Communities of Columbus, Ohio Children (particularly low-income minorities and refugees) are at high risk for serious injury or death from motor vehicle crashes. Interpreter-assisted data collection included key informant interviews, focus groups and face-to-face surveys with the Somali community of Columbus, Ohio about child passenger safety. Measurements included prevalence of child safety seats use, awareness and knowledge of and barriers to proper use (...) in order to inform development, implementation, and initial evaluation of a culturally-appropriate intervention for Somali families. Somali parents regarded child passenger safety as an important topic, but many reported improper restraint behaviors of one or more children and/or did not have an adequate number of child safety seats. Few parents reported having child safety seats installed by a professional technician. Child passenger safety practices in the Somali communities of Columbus are a public

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2017 Journal of community health

18. Results of an RCT in Two Pediatric Emergency Departments to Evaluate the Efficacy of an m-Health Educational App on Car Seat Use. (PubMed)

Results of an RCT in Two Pediatric Emergency Departments to Evaluate the Efficacy of an m-Health Educational App on Car Seat Use. The growing interest in incorporating prevention into emergency health care make it timely to examine the use of computer technology to efficiently deliver effective education in this setting.This RCT compared results from an intervention group (n=367) that received child passenger safety information, to an attention-matched control (n=375). A baseline survey and two (...) follow-up surveys at 3 and 6 months were conducted.Data were collected from June 2014 to September 2016 from a sample of parents with children aged 4-7 years recruited from a pediatric emergency department in an East Coast urban area and one in a Midwest semi-rural area.A theory-based, stage-tailored educational program, Safety in Seconds v2.0TM, delivered on a mobile app.Four car seat behaviors: (1) having the correct restraint for the child's age and weight; (2) having the child ride

2018 American journal of preventive medicine

19. Randomized Control Trial of Booster Seat Education Material to Increase Perceived Benefit Among Parents

and hips, and instead wear it on their abdomen and neck. When worn in this way, seat belts direct crash forces to these parts of the body, potentially causing serious damage to internal organs and the spine. For this reason, children of these ages need to use a booster seat; a safety device that prevents seat belt related injuries by raising the child and ensuring the straps are correctly worn across the thorax and hips. In Canada, half of the children who should be using booster seats are prematurely (...) %). Furthermore, recent research indicates that parents' perception of the safety benefit of booster seats is the strongest predictor of use, yet no study to date has tested an education intervention that increases perceived benefit; instead, these interventions focus on teaching guidelines (i.e., minimum and maximum age, height, and weight to determine when a child should use a booster seat, and when it is safe for a child to use only the seat belt). The present approach to encouraging booster seat use

2018 Clinical Trials

20. Prevention of Scoliosis in Patients With Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Using Portable Seat Device

or more studies before adding more. Prevention of Scoliosis in Patients With Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Using Portable Seat Device The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. of clinical studies and talk to your health care provider before participating. Read our for details. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03611244 Recruitment Status : Recruiting (...) Prevention of Scoliosis in Patients With Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Using Portable Seat Device Prevention of Scoliosis in Patients With Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Using Portable Seat Device - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one

2018 Clinical Trials

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