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Cephalhematoma

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41. A randomized trial of two vacuum extraction techniques. (PubMed)

= .97), nor did it lead to a reduction in method failures (continuous 12, intermittent nine; P = .72). The intermittent method did not appear to offer any benefit to the neonate regarding cephalhematoma formation (continuous 20, intermittent 17; P = .686) or any other measure of neonatal outcome. Maternal lacerations and episiotomy extensions were evenly distributed between the groups. Overall, the efficacy rate of the vacuum cup was 93.5% and the cephalhematoma rate was 11.5%.No differences

1997 Obstetrics and Gynecology

42. Hyperkalemia most likely associated with massive cephalhematoma in a newborn infant who was treated with urgent peritoneal dialysis: case report. (PubMed)

Hyperkalemia most likely associated with massive cephalhematoma in a newborn infant who was treated with urgent peritoneal dialysis: case report. Cephalhematomas rarely lead to serious complications such as infection, osteomyelitis and skull fractures. However, we present a newborn infant with hyperkalemia in the context of a serious complication believed to be caused by hemolysis of a large cephalhematoma. The patient was treated with urgent peritoneal dialysis and discharged with a successful (...) outcome. In conclusion, neonates with massive cephalhematoma should be closely examined in terms of bilirubin counts as well as electrolyte counts.

2003 Journal of Emergency Medicine

43. Simple excision and periosteal reattachment for the treatment of calcified cephalhematoma. Technical note. (PubMed)

Simple excision and periosteal reattachment for the treatment of calcified cephalhematoma. Technical note. Until now, calcified cephalhematoma has been treated by excision of the lesion and the use of an onlay autograft. The authors report their use of a less complicated alternative, simple excision and periosteal reattachment, in a 3-month-old male infant. They excised the calcified cap of cephalhematoma and reattached the periosteum to the exposed bone surface instead of using an onlay (...) autograft technique. A follow-up CT scan demonstrated a smooth skull contour and good cosmetic appearance. The authors note that this is the first report of the successful use of simple excision and periosteal reattachment for the treatment of a case of calcified cephalhematoma in which there was a depressed area after the calcified cap was removed. They conclude that in cases of calcified cephalhematoma it may be unnecessary to perform a complicated cranioplasty with bone harvested from the top

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2007 Journal of Neurosurgery

44. Infected cephalhematoma associated with placement of scalp electrode. (PubMed)

Infected cephalhematoma associated with placement of scalp electrode. 6989467 1980 07 28 2018 11 13 0008-4409 122 8 1980 Apr 19 Canadian Medical Association journal Can Med Assoc J Infected cephalhematoma associated with placement of scalp electrode. 876-8 Hegde H R HR eng Case Reports Journal Article Canada Can Med Assoc J 0414110 0008-4409 AIM IM Cerebral Hemorrhage complications congenital Electrodes adverse effects Escherichia coli Infections etiology Female Fetal Monitoring Hematoma

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1980 Canadian Medical Association Journal

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