How to Trip Rapid Review

Step 1: Select articles relevant to your search (remember the system is only optimised for single intervention studies)

Step 2: press

Step 3: review the result, and maybe amend the or if you know better! If we're unsure of the overall sentiment of the trial we will display the conclusion under the article title. We then require you to tell us what the correct sentiment is.

935 results for

Central Retinal Artery Occlusion

by
...
Alerts

Export results

Use check boxes to select individual results below

SmartSearch available

Trip's SmartSearch engine has discovered connected searches & results. Click to show

1. Amalric triangular sign in a case of central retinal artery occlusion combined with posterior ciliary artery occlusion – Case report (Full text)

Amalric triangular sign in a case of central retinal artery occlusion combined with posterior ciliary artery occlusion – Case report Amalric triangular sign is a rare phenomenon indicating choroidal ischemia. In this study, we reported a typical Amalric triangular sign in a case of central retinal artery occlusion (CRAO) combined with posterior ciliary artery (PCA) occlusion.A 49-year-old women developed sudden visual loss in her left eye for one day. Ocular examination revealed rubeosis (...) of the central retinal artery and posterior ciliary artery.The Amalric triangular sign indicates the occlusion on the main truck of PCA. The sign might combine with CRAO or branch retinal artery occlusion (BRAO) as presented in our case and therefore is a strong indication of possible systemic vascular risk.

2018 American journal of ophthalmology case reports PubMed

2. Combined bilateral ophthalmic artery occlusion & central retinal vein occlusion from presumed giant cell arteritis (Full text)

Combined bilateral ophthalmic artery occlusion & central retinal vein occlusion from presumed giant cell arteritis To report on a severe case of presumed giant cell arteritis (GCA) presenting with partial and complete ophthalmic artery occlusion along with bilateral central retinal vein occlusions (CRVO).A 73-year-old female presented with bilateral complete vision loss of sudden onset. The patient also experienced a mild frontal headache prior to onset of vision loss. Fundus examination (...) revealed bilateral central retinal artery occlusion (CRAO) and CRVO. Subsequent fluorescein angiography indicated partial right ophthalmic artery occlusion and complete left ophthalmic artery occlusion. Acute phase reactants were elevated. The patient was clinically diagnosed with GCA and intravenous (IV) steroids were initiated. Four days later, a temporal artery biopsy (TAB) was performed and resulted as negative for granulomatous inflammation. The patient did not regain vision and remained

2018 American journal of ophthalmology case reports PubMed

3. Central retinal artery occlusion during vitrectomy: Immediate retinal revascularization following induction of posterior vitreous detachment (Full text)

Central retinal artery occlusion during vitrectomy: Immediate retinal revascularization following induction of posterior vitreous detachment To describe a patient with acute central retinal artery occlusion (CRAO) during vitrectomy surgery and the possible role of vitrectomy in acute CRAO management.An 84-year-old man presented with broad vitreomacular traction and epiretinal membrane in the right eye. Preoperative assessment clearly showed normal retinal vasculature. On starting vitrectomy (...) , complete CRAO with marked segmentation of all retinal vessels was noted. Vitrectomy was performed in the usual manner and once the posterior hyaloid detached from the disc, immediate complete revascularization of the retinal vessels was noted. The patient had a complete visual recovery.Immediate vitrectomy with induction of posterior vitreous detachment may have a role in selected cases of acute CRAO, particularly if performed within a short window.

2018 American journal of ophthalmology case reports PubMed

4. ACUTE RETINAL ISCHEMIA IN CENTRAL VERSUS BRANCH RETINAL ARTERY OCCLUSION: Changes in Retinal Layers' Thickness on Spectral-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography in Different Grades of Retinal Ischemia. (PubMed)

ACUTE RETINAL ISCHEMIA IN CENTRAL VERSUS BRANCH RETINAL ARTERY OCCLUSION: Changes in Retinal Layers' Thickness on Spectral-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography in Different Grades of Retinal Ischemia. To compare changes in thickness of separate retinal layers between acute central and branch retinal artery occlusion (RAO) regarding the severity grade of retinal ischemia using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography.Design: retrospective, observational case-control series.institutional.114 (...) patients with acute RAO. Examinations were conducted with spectral-domain optical coherence tomography at the first visit (baseline).RAO was categorized as branch (43 patients) or central RAO (71 patients) clinically. Retinal artery occlusion was categorized into the 3 grades "incomplete," "subtotal," and "total," based on optical coherence tomography findings. Thickness of several retinal layers was evaluated on spectral-domain optical coherence tomography images. Obtained data were compared between

2019 Retina

5. Visual field defects and changes in central retinal artery occlusion. (Full text)

Visual field defects and changes in central retinal artery occlusion. To investigate the characteristics and temporal changes in visual field defects (VFDs) in eyes with acute central retinal artery occlusion (CRAO).Retrospective, observational case series.A total of 119 patients diagnosed with acute non-arteritic CRAO through examination with Goldmann perimetry were included among the patients who visited Seoul National University Bundang Hospital between January 2009 and December 2016 (...) . They were treated with either conservative treatments or intra-arterial thrombolysis (IAT). The baseline features and temporal changes of visual field examination results and the association with clinical parameters including visual acuity, optical coherence tomography (OCT) findings, and the CRAO stages.All of the 119 patients showed visual field defect and suffered unilateral acute CRAO. We observed five characteristic VFDs: peripheral constriction only (8%), paracentral scotoma (3%), central

2019 PLoS ONE PubMed

6. Calcified amorphous tumor: A rare cause of central retinal artery occlusion (Full text)

Calcified amorphous tumor: A rare cause of central retinal artery occlusion We report the case of a central retinal artery occlusion secondary to presumed embolus from a calcified amorphous tumor of the heart, a very rare non-neoplastic cardiac mass.A 60-year-old female presented with acute unilateral vision loss of the left eye. Examination revealed hand motion visual acuity of the left eye and a left relative afferent pupillary defect. Fundoscopy showed whitening of the macula with a cherry (...) red spot, consistent with a central retinal artery occlusion. Initial workup was unremarkable, including hypercoagulability labs, magnetic resonance imaging of the brain, and magnetic resonance angiography of the head and neck. Transthoracic echocardiogram (TTE) showed calcification of the mitral valve but no masses. Subsequently, transesophageal echocardiogram (TEE) was performed, which revealed a mobile calcified amorphous tumor of the heart.Calcified amorphous tumor of the heart is a very rare

2018 American journal of ophthalmology case reports PubMed

7. Central retinal artery occlusion on postoperative day one after vitreoretinal surgery (Full text)

Central retinal artery occlusion on postoperative day one after vitreoretinal surgery To report two cases of central retinal artery occlusion (CRAO) associated with vitreoretinal surgery.Two patients underwent vitreoretinal surgery and were diagnosed with CRAO on postoperative day one. Both had received retrobulbar anesthetic blocks, followed by pars plana vitrectomy in one patient and scleral buckling in the other patient. Best-corrected visual acuity at last follow-up was 20/40 and 20/400

2018 American journal of ophthalmology case reports PubMed

8. Central retinal artery occlusion secondary to Barlow's disease (Full text)

Central retinal artery occlusion secondary to Barlow's disease To report a rare case of isolated, unilateral CRAO in a young patient with mitral valve prolapse secondary to Barlow's disease.A 29-year-old woman with history of premature ventricular contractions and cardiac ablation presented to the emergency room after sudden onset painless visual loss in her left eye (OS). Her vision was 20/20 in her right eye and hand motion in the left. Fundus exam demonstrated a central retinal artery (...) occlusion (CRAO) OS. Computerized tomography of head and neck were unremarkable. She underwent cerebral angiogram and local intra-arterial thrombolysis. Her vision remained stable post-procedure, with marked APD and stable fundus examination. Her cardiac work-up revealed a left atrial mass with calcified mitral valve, and small atrial septal defect. Rheumatologic, hematologic, and auto-immune work-up were unremarkable. She underwent resection of the mass with repair of mitral valve and ASD closure

2018 American journal of ophthalmology case reports PubMed

9. Correction: Visual field defects and changes in central retinal artery occlusion. (Full text)

Correction: Visual field defects and changes in central retinal artery occlusion. [This corrects the article DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0209118.].

2019 PLoS ONE PubMed

10. Intra-retinal Arterial Cannulation using a Microneedle for Central Retinal Artery Occlusion (Full text)

Intra-retinal Arterial Cannulation using a Microneedle for Central Retinal Artery Occlusion Central retinal artery occlusion (CRAO) is a severe disease, often causing blindness. We evaluated the efficacy and safety of a surgical procedure for the treatment of acute CRAO in which retinal arterial cannulation with tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) is performed. The surgical procedure consisted of vitrectomy followed by cannulation of the central retinal artery and injection of tPA (200 μg) using (...) a 47-gauge microneedle. Thirteen CRAO patients were treated within 48 hours of the onset of symptoms. The central retinal artery of all 13 eyes was successfully cannulated. The mean interval between the onset of symptoms and surgery was 38.7 hours. The results for all 13 eyes treated showed a statistically significant improvement in mean visual acuity between before and one month after treatment (-1.60 vs. -0.82 logarithmic values for minimum angle resolution (LogMAR), p = 0.0021). Fluorescein

2018 Scientific reports PubMed

11. Central Retinal Artery Occlusion with Sparing of Cilioretinal Artery Post Pulmonary Artery Stenting (Full text)

Central Retinal Artery Occlusion with Sparing of Cilioretinal Artery Post Pulmonary Artery Stenting Central retinal arterial occlusion is an ocular emergency. Central retinal artery occlusion following cardiac procedures have been described in adults. We describe a pediatric patient who developed central retinal artery occlusion following pulmonary artery stenting. It is important to highlight this potential risk to ensure early diagnosis and prompt treatment.

2018 Cureus PubMed

12. Central retinal artery occlusion - a new, provisional treatment approach. (PubMed)

Central retinal artery occlusion - a new, provisional treatment approach. The retinal ganglion cells infarcted in central retinal artery occlusion (CRAO) are the somata of the optic nerve axons, part of the central nervous system. Consequently, CRAO with inner retinal infarction is a small vessel stroke, usually with the devastating consequence of severe visual loss in the affected eye. At present, there is no generally accepted, evidence-based therapy of non-arteritic CRAO in contrast

2019 Survey of Ophthalmology

13. Acute Vascular Ischemic Events in Patients with Central Retinal Artery Occlusion in the United States: A Nationwide Study 2003-2014. (PubMed)

Acute Vascular Ischemic Events in Patients with Central Retinal Artery Occlusion in the United States: A Nationwide Study 2003-2014. Central retinal artery occlusion (CRAO) confers a high risk of acute vascular ischemic events, including stroke and myocardial infarction (MI). Understanding the burden and risk factor profile of these ischemic events can serve as a valuable guide for ophthalmologists in the management and appropriate referral of these patients.Retrospective cross-sectional study (...) trend over the years, almost doubling in 2014 in comparison to 2003 (15.3% vs. 7.7%). The combined risk of in-hospital stroke, transient ischemic attack, acute MI or mortality was 19%. Female gender, hypertension, carotid artery stenosis, aortic valve disease, smoking, and alcohol dependence or abuse were positive predictors of in-hospital stroke.There is a significant burden of vascular risk factors, associated with an increased risk of in-hospital stroke, acute MI and death in CRAO patients

2019 American Journal of Ophthalmology

14. Aspirin use in central retinal arterial occlusion to prevent ischaemic stroke: a retrospective cohort study in Taiwan. (Full text)

Aspirin use in central retinal arterial occlusion to prevent ischaemic stroke: a retrospective cohort study in Taiwan. To understand the efficacy of aspirin use for preventing ischaemic stroke after central retinal artery occlusion (CRAO).The retrospective cohort study was conducted using the National Health Insurance Research Database from 1998 to 2013.A population-based study.A total of 9437 participants with newly diagnosed CRAO were identified. Participants who had a previous stroke (...) and/or retinal vascular occlusion, were aged <20 years and used aspirin 3 months before the event were excluded. There were 3778 eligible participants matched by propensity score, and they were divided into aspirin (n=434) and aspirin-naive (n=1736) groups after the matching.Cox proportional hazard models and cumulative survival curves were used to assess ischaemic stroke in the study groups, along with log-rank tests to compare group differences.Incidence of ischaemic stroke in the aspirin and aspirin-naive

2019 BMJ open PubMed

15. Stroke Risk Before and After Central Retinal Artery Occlusion in a US Cohort. (PubMed)

Stroke Risk Before and After Central Retinal Artery Occlusion in a US Cohort. To determine the risk of ischemic stroke, transient ischemic attack (TIA), and amaurosis fugax around the time of central retinal artery occlusion (CRAO).Patients at Mayo Clinic sites with a diagnosis code of CRAO from January 1, 2001, through September 9, 2016, were reviewed. New CRAOs were confirmed, and ischemic stroke, TIA, and amaurosis fugax events were tallied within 15 days before and after CRAO.Three hundred

2019 Mayo Clinic Proceedings

16. Cardiovascular risk factors in patients with combined central retinal vein occlusion and cilioretinal artery occlusion: Case report. (Full text)

Cardiovascular risk factors in patients with combined central retinal vein occlusion and cilioretinal artery occlusion: Case report. To analyze cardiovascular risk factors and comorbidity of acute unilateral visual loss due to combined central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO) and cilioretinal artery occlusion (CLRAO).Among patients with retinal vein or artery occlusion hospitalized at the Department of Ophthalmology between January 2011 and August 2017, subjects with combined CRVO/CLRAO were (...) selected. All of them underwent ophthalmologic and cardiologic examination, including fluorescein angiography, optical coherence tomography, 12-lead electrocardiogram, transthoracic and transesophageal echocardiography, carotid Doppler sonography, cerebral magnetic resonance imaging, and a panel of laboratory tests.Four subjects with coexisting CRVO and CLRAO were found among 146 patients with retinal vein or artery occlusion. There were no other types of concomitance of CRVO and retinal artery

2018 Medicine PubMed

17. Central retinal artery occlusion - rethinking retinal survival time. (Full text)

Central retinal artery occlusion - rethinking retinal survival time. The critical time from onset of complete occlusion of the central retinal artery (CRA) to functionally significant inner retinal infarction represents a window of opportunity for treatment and also has medical-legal implications, particularly when central retinal artery occlusion (CRAO) complicates therapeutic interventions. Here, we review the evidence for time to infarction from complete CRAO and discuss the implications (...) of our findings.A Medline search was performed using each of the terms "central retinal artery occlusion", "retinal infarction", "retinal ischemia", and "cherry red spot" from 1970 to the present including articles in French and German. All retrieved references as well as their reference lists were screened for relevance. An Internet search using these terms was also performed to look for additional references.We find that the experimental evidence showing that inner retinal infarction occurs after

2018 BMC Ophthalmology PubMed

18. Retinal Endovascular Surgery with Tissue Plasminogen Activator Injection for Central Retinal Artery Occlusion (Full text)

Retinal Endovascular Surgery with Tissue Plasminogen Activator Injection for Central Retinal Artery Occlusion To report 2 cases of central retinal artery occlusion (CRAO) who underwent retinal endovascular surgery with injection of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) into the retinal artery and showed a remarkable improvement in visual acuity and retinal circulation.Standard 25-G vitrectomy was performed under local anesthesia. Simultaneously, tPA (80,000 units/mL) solution was injected (...) into the retinal artery of the optic disc for 2-3 min using a microneedle. Changes in visual acuity, fundus photography, optical coherence tomography (OCT), fluorescein angiography, and laser speckle flowgraphy (LSFG) results were examined.Both cases could be treated within 12 h after the onset of CRAO. Case 1 was a 47-year-old woman. Her visual acuity improved from counting fingers before operation to 0.08 logMAR 1 month after the surgery. However, thinning of the retina at the macula was observed by OCT

2018 Case reports in ophthalmology PubMed

19. Intra-Arterial Thrombolysis for Acute Central Retinal Artery Occlusion: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. (Full text)

Intra-Arterial Thrombolysis for Acute Central Retinal Artery Occlusion: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. Acute central retinal artery occlusion (CRAO) is a serious ophthalmologic emergency that may result in monocular blindness. To date, studies evaluating intra-arterial thrombolysis (IAT) have not shown a definitive clinical benefit. We have conducted a systematic review with a meta-analysis to effectively evaluate this treatment option.A systematic literature search was focused

2018 Frontiers in neurology PubMed

20. Central Retinal Artery Occlusion Masquerading as Branch Retinal Artery Occlusion (Full text)

Central Retinal Artery Occlusion Masquerading as Branch Retinal Artery Occlusion 27729760 2017 03 22 2018 11 13 2092-9382 30 5 2016 Oct Korean journal of ophthalmology : KJO Korean J Ophthalmol Central Retinal Artery Occlusion Masquerading as Branch Retinal Artery Occlusion. 390-391 Kang Sung Il SI Department of Ophthalmology, Dongsan Medical Center, Keimyung University School of Medicine, Daegu, Korea. Kim Yu Cheol YC Department of Ophthalmology, Dongsan Medical Center, Keimyung University (...) School of Medicine, Daegu, Korea. eng Case Reports Letter 2016 09 29 Korea (South) Korean J Ophthalmol 8804513 1011-8942 IM Aged, 80 and over Diagnosis, Differential Fluorescein Angiography Fundus Oculi Humans Male Retinal Artery diagnostic imaging Retinal Artery Occlusion diagnosis No potential conflict of interest relevant to this article was reported. 2016 10 13 6 0 2016 10 13 6 0 2017 3 23 6 0 ppublish 27729760 10.3341/kjo.2016.30.5.390 PMC5057016 Retina. 2007 Mar;27(3):276-89 17460582 Retina

2016 Korean journal of ophthalmology : KJO PubMed

To help you find the content you need quickly, you can filter your results via the categories on the right-hand side >>>>