How to Trip Rapid Review

Step 1: Select articles relevant to your search (remember the system is only optimised for single intervention studies)

Step 2: press

Step 3: review the result, and maybe amend the or if you know better! If we're unsure of the overall sentiment of the trial we will display the conclusion under the article title. We then require you to tell us what the correct sentiment is.

4,600 results for

Cellulitis

by
...
Latest & greatest
Alerts

Export results

Use check boxes to select individual results below

SmartSearch available

Trip's SmartSearch engine has discovered connected searches & results. Click to show

1. Cellulitis and erysipelas: antimicrobial prescribing

Cellulitis and erysipelas: antimicrobial prescribing Cellulitis and erysipelas: antimicrobial Cellulitis and erysipelas: antimicrobial prescribing prescribing NICE guideline Published: 27 September 2019 www.nice.org.uk/guidance/ng141 © NICE 2019. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and-conditions#notice-of- rights).Y Y our responsibility our responsibility The recommendations in this guideline represent the view of NICE, arrived at after careful (...) in a way that would be inconsistent with complying with those duties. Commissioners and providers have a responsibility to promote an environmentally sustainable health and care system and should assess and reduce the environmental impact of implementing NICE recommendations wherever possible. Cellulitis and erysipelas: antimicrobial prescribing (NG141) © NICE 2019. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and- conditions#notice-of-rights). Page 2 of 36Contents

2019 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

2. Peri-orbital and orbital cellulitis

Peri-orbital and orbital cellulitis Peri-orbital and orbital cellulitis - Symptoms, diagnosis and treatment | BMJ Best Practice You'll need a subscription to access all of BMJ Best Practice Search  Peri-orbital and orbital cellulitis Last reviewed: February 2019 Last updated: March 2018 Summary Peri-orbital cellulitis is an infectious process occurring in the eyelid tissues superficial to (anterior to or above) the orbital septum. It is usually due to superficial tissue injury (e.g., insect (...) bite or chalazion). Orbital cellulitis is an infectious process affecting the muscles and fat within the orbit, posterior or deep to the orbital septum, not involving the globe. It is usually due to underlying bacterial sinusitis. Peri-orbital cellulitis is of concern in children because it may be secondary to occult underlying bacterial sinusitis or, rarely, due to bacteraemic spread from a primary infection (e.g., pneumonia), and may rapidly progress to orbital cellulitis in children

2018 BMJ Best Practice

3. Cellulitis

Cellulitis Cellulitis - Symptoms, diagnosis and treatment | BMJ Best Practice You'll need a subscription to access all of BMJ Best Practice Search  Cellulitis Last reviewed: February 2019 Last updated: June 2018 Summary Diagnosis can usually be made on history and examination only, although purulent focus culture and molecular diagnostic procedures should be performed if cellulitis is associated with a wound or pustular focus. Prior episodes of cellulitis, pre-existing lymphoedema or venous (...) insufficiency, and tinea pedis can all predispose to this condition. Antibiotics targeted at the most common aetiologies (streptococci and Staphylococcus aureus ) usually result in resolution. Definition Cellulitis is an acute spreading infection of the skin with visually indistinct borders that principally involves the dermis and subcutaneous tissue. It is characterised by erythema, oedema, warmth, and tenderness, and commonly occurs in an extremity. Erysipelas is a distinct form of superficial cellulitis

2018 BMJ Best Practice

7. Controversies in the Diagnosis and Management of Cellulitis

Controversies in the Diagnosis and Management of Cellulitis Emergency Medicine > Journal Club > Archive > July 2017 Toggle navigation July 2017 Controversies in the Diagnosis and Management of Cellulitis Vignette You're moonlighting in the local ED one afternoon, when you encounter Mrs. X, a 40-year-old woman with rheumatoid arthritis, for which she takes Methotrexate. She was gardening three days prior to presentation when she suffered a small cut to her left ankle from a misplaced spade (...) in both legs for quite some time, chalked up in the past to chronic lymphedema and CHF, but now has redness and pain to both ankles and lower legs. Given the severity of the redness and swelling, you elect to treat the patient for cellulitis and order vancomycin, then place an admission order. The hospitalist muses that perhaps the patient has , but admits that it's probably wort treating for potential cellulits. Thinking back to both patients later in the day, you begin to worry about your treatment

2017 Washington University Emergency Medicine Journal Club

8. Antibiotics in Phlegmonous Laryngitis (Laryngeal Cellulitis) Full Text available with Trip Pro

Antibiotics in Phlegmonous Laryngitis (Laryngeal Cellulitis) 13209146 2003 05 01 2018 12 01 0007-1447 2 4902 1954 Dec 18 British medical journal Br Med J Antibiotics in phlegmonous laryngitis (laryngeal cellulitis). 1453-5 ROSENBAUM E E eng Journal Article England Br Med J 0372673 0007-1447 0 Anti-Bacterial Agents 0 Antibiotics, Antitubercular 0 Dermatologic Agents OM Anti-Bacterial Agents Antibiotics, Antitubercular Cellulitis Dermatologic Agents Humans Laryngeal Diseases Laryngitis Larynx (...) 5527:20922:100:258 CELLULITIS LARYNX/diseases 1954 12 18 1954 12 18 0 1 1954 12 18 0 0 ppublish 13209146 PMC2079919

1954 British medical journal

9. Cephalexin plus trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole was not superior to cephalexin alone for the treatment of outpatient non-purulent cellulitis

Cephalexin plus trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole was not superior to cephalexin alone for the treatment of outpatient non-purulent cellulitis Cephalexin plus trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole was not superior to cephalexin alone for the treatment of outpatient non-purulent cellulitis | BMJ Evidence-Based Medicine We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about how we use (...) of outpatient non-purulent cellulitis Article Text Commentary: General medicine Cephalexin plus trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole was not superior to cephalexin alone for the treatment of outpatient non-purulent cellulitis Loren G Miller Statistics from Altmetric.com Commentary on: Moran GJ, Krishnadasan A, Mower WR, et al . Effect of cephalexin plus trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole vs cephalexin alone on clinical cure of uncomplicated cellulitis: a randomised clinical trial. JAMA 2017;317:2088–96. Context Skin

2017 Evidence-Based Medicine

10. Orbital apex syndrome from bacterial sinusitis without orbital cellulitis Full Text available with Trip Pro

Orbital apex syndrome from bacterial sinusitis without orbital cellulitis To describe a case of orbital apex syndrome as a result of isolated bacterial sinusitis.A 63-year-old woman presented with an orbital apex syndrome from isolated bacterial sinusitis with rapidly declining visual acuity to no light perception. We compared our case with 6 similar cases of severe vision loss from isolated bacterial sinusitis. In contrast to previously published cases, our patient presented with good vision

2018 American journal of ophthalmology case reports

11. Cellulitis - acute

Cellulitis - acute Cellulitis - acute - NICE CKS Share Cellulitis - acute: Summary Cellulitis is an acute bacterial infection of the dermis and subcutaneous tissue. The infected area, most commonly the lower limb, is characterized by pain, warmth, swelling, and erythema. Blisters and bullae may form. Fever, malaise, nausea, and rigors may accompany or precede the skin changes. Cellulitis develops when microorganisms (most commonly Streptococcus pyogenes and Staphylococcus aureus) gain entry (...) to the dermal and subcutaneous tissues via disruptions in the cutaneous barrier. Risk factors include skin trauma, ulceration, and obesity. Complications of cellulitis include necrotizing fasciitis, sepsis, persistent leg ulceration, and recurrent cellulitis. Most episodes of cellulitis resolve with treatment, and major complications are absent. However, recurrence is common, and each episode increases the likelihood of subsequent recurrence. The diagnosis of cellulitis can usually be made on history

2019 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

12. Which outcomes are reported in cellulitis trials? Results of a review of outcomes included in cellulitis trials and a patient priority setting survey. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Which outcomes are reported in cellulitis trials? Results of a review of outcomes included in cellulitis trials and a patient priority setting survey. There is an emerging need to develop consistent outcomes in clinical trials to allow effective comparison of treatment effects. No systematic review has previously looked at the reporting of outcome measures used in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on the treatment and prevention of cellulitis (erysipelas).The primary aim of this review (...) was to describe the breadth of outcomes reported from RCTs on cellulitis treatment and prevention. The secondary aim was to identify outcome themes from patients' and healthcare professionals' feedback from a cellulitis Priority Setting Partnership (PSP).We conducted a review of all outcome measures used in RCTs from two recent Cochrane reviews. Free-text responses from a cellulitis priority setting survey were used to understand the perspectives of patients and healthcare professionals.Outcomes from 42 RCTs

2017 British Journal of Dermatology

13. Adjunctive clindamycin for cellulitis: a clinical trial comparing flucloxacillin with or without clindamycin for the treatment of limb cellulitis. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Adjunctive clindamycin for cellulitis: a clinical trial comparing flucloxacillin with or without clindamycin for the treatment of limb cellulitis. To compare flucloxacillin with clindamycin to flucloxacillin alone for the treatment of limb cellulitis.Parallel, double-blinded, randomised controlled trial.Emergency department attendances and general practice referrals within 20 hospitals in England.Flucloxacillin, at a minimum of 500 mg 4 times per day for 5 days, with clindamycin 300 mg 4 times (...) . There was no clinically significant difference in any secondary outcome measures. There was no significant difference in the number of patients stating that they had returned to normal activities at the day 30 interview in the flucloxacillin with clindamycin allocation (99/121, 82%) versus flucloxacillin alone (104/129, 81%)-adjusted OR 0.90 (95% CI 0.44 to 1.84).The addition of a short course of clindamycin to flucloxacillin early on in limb cellulitis does not improve outcome. The addition of clindamycin doubles

2017 BMJ open Controlled trial quality: predicted high

14. Cellulitis and Soft Tissue Infections. (Abstract)

Cellulitis and Soft Tissue Infections. Cellulitis and soft tissue infections are a diverse group of diseases that range from uncomplicated cellulitis to necrotizing fasciitis. Management of predisposing conditions is the primary means of prevention. Cellulitis is a clinical diagnosis and thus is made on the basis of history and physical examination. Imaging may be helpful for characterizing purulent soft tissue infections and associated osteomyelitis. Treatment varies according to the type

2018 Annals of Internal Medicine

15. Cellulitis in adult patients: A large, multicenter, observational, prospective study of 606 episodes and analysis of the factors related to the response to treatment. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Cellulitis in adult patients: A large, multicenter, observational, prospective study of 606 episodes and analysis of the factors related to the response to treatment. Cellulitis is a frequent cause of hospital admission of adult patients. Increasing prevalence of multiresistant microorganisms, comorbidities, predisposing factors and medical and surgical therapies might affect cellulitis response and recurrence rate.Prospective and observational study of 606 adult patients with cellulitis (...) admitted to several Spanish hospitals. Comorbidities, microbiological, clinical, diagnostic, treatment (surgical and antibiotic) data were analyzed according to the cellulitis response. Good response implied cure. Poor response implied failure to cure or initial cure but relapse within 30 days of hospital discharge.Mean age was 63.3 years and 51.8% were men. Poor responses were significantly associated with age, previous episodes of cellulitis, prior wounds and skin lesions, venous insufficiency

2018 PLoS ONE

16. Varicella zoster causing preseptal cellulitis - uncommon but possible Full Text available with Trip Pro

Varicella zoster causing preseptal cellulitis - uncommon but possible Varicella has been known to be a harmless childhood disease. However, it has been reported that severe complications have taken place following Varicella infection, in both immunocompetent, as well as immunocompromised, individuals. Cutaneous complications of Varicella may manifest as preseptal cellulitis, albeit rarely.We present a case of a 4-year-old boy who presented with symptoms and signs of preseptal cellulitis (...) following Varicella infection. He was referred to the otorhinolaryngology team for a nasoendoscopy to rule out sinusitis, in view of the fear that a child presenting with a swollen red eye may be a case of true orbital cellulitis. He was treated successfully with intravenous antibiotics and surgical drainage of the preseptal collection.It is imperative for clinicians to be aware that a simple Varicella infection may lead to cutaneous complications in the pediatric age group, especially in children who

2017 Malaysian family physician : the official journal of the Academy of Family Physicians of Malaysia

17. Case report of the family transmission of Streptococcus pyogenes orbital cellulitis Full Text available with Trip Pro

Case report of the family transmission of Streptococcus pyogenes orbital cellulitis This is a case report of an unusual case of the family transmission of Streptococcus pyogenes infection in three siblings. One brother contracted the infection which resulted in orbital cellulitis of two of his siblings, in the absence of anatomical or immunological predisposing factors.A young boy contracted an uncomplicated S pyogenes upper respiratory tract infection. The twin brother closely followed (...) by the older sister both developed a S pyogenes orbital cellulitis a couple of days later.To our knowledge, this is the first case ever reported of family transmission of orbital cellulitis. This highlights the importance of early diagnosis and treatment of S pyogenes, and the role of throat cultures as means of diagnosis even in the absence of symptoms or signs of pharyngitis.

2017 American journal of ophthalmology case reports

18. Low-dose penicillin for recurrent cellulitis?

Low-dose penicillin for recurrent cellulitis? Low-dose penicillin for recurrent cellulitis? Toggle navigation Shared more. Cited more. Safe forever. Toggle navigation View Item JavaScript is disabled for your browser. Some features of this site may not work without it. Search MOspace This Collection Browse Statistics Low-dose penicillin for recurrent cellulitis? View/ Open Date 2014-01 Format Metadata Abstract Practice changer: Prescribe low-dose penicillin to patients with recurrent leg (...) cellulitis to decrease the frequency of recurrent episodes. URI Part of Citation Journal of Family Practice, 63(1) 2014: E10-E12. Rights OpenAccess. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 License. Collections hosted by hosted by

2014 PURLS

19. Rapid onset of orbital cellulitis after uncomplicated strabismus surgery. (Abstract)

Rapid onset of orbital cellulitis after uncomplicated strabismus surgery. Orbital cellulitis is extremely uncommon following strabismus surgery. When it occurs, the infection has been reported to present from day 1 to within 1 week following surgery and has the potential for significant morbidity. We report the case of a 6.5-year-old boy presenting with unilateral orbital cellulitis growing group A Streptococcus pyogenes on postoperative day 1, after uncomplicated bilateral medial rectus

2019 JAAPOS - Journal of the American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus

20. Chlamydia trachomatis presenting as preseptal cellulitis in a 3-year-old girl. (Abstract)

Chlamydia trachomatis presenting as preseptal cellulitis in a 3-year-old girl. Inclusion conjunctivitis usually presents with lid swelling, red eye, foreign body sensation, and a mucopurulent discharge in association with a follicular reaction involving the palpebral and bulbar conjunctiva and semilunar fold. Similar to epidemic keratoconjunctivitis, it may present with preauricular lymphadenopathy, superficial punctate keratitis, and subepithelial corneal infiltrates, which tend to be more (...) peripheral. We present the case of preseptal cellulitis in a 3-year-old child, caused by nonconsensual sexual contact with chlamydia trachomatis.Copyright © 2019 American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

2019 JAAPOS - Journal of the American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus

To help you find the content you need quickly, you can filter your results via the categories on the right-hand side >>>>