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Cavernous Sinus

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141. Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity Cancer Treatment (Adult) (PDQ®): Health Professional Version

radiation therapy for head and neck cancer suggests a significant loss of local control when the administration of radiation therapy was prolonged; therefore, lengthening of standard treatment schedules should be avoided whenever possible.[ ] Surgery Surgical exploration may be required to determine operability. Destruction of the base of skull (i.e., anterior cranial fossa), cavernous sinus, or the pterygoid process; infiltration of the mucous membranes of the nasopharynx; or nonresectable lymph node (...) Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity Cancer Treatment (Adult) (PDQ®): Health Professional Version Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity Cancer Treatment (Adult) (PDQ®) - PDQ Cancer Information Summaries - NCBI Bookshelf Warning: The NCBI web site requires JavaScript to function. Search database Search term Search NCBI Bookshelf. A service of the National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health. PDQ Cancer Information Summaries [Internet]. Bethesda (MD): National Cancer Institute (US); 2002

2018 PDQ - NCI's Comprehensive Cancer Database

142. Transvenous Aneurysm Sac and Rupture Point Coil Embolization of Direct Carotid Cavernous Fistula after Pipeline Embolization (PubMed)

-year-old woman suffered from dCCF after PED embolization. A microcatheter was advanced through the transvenous approach into the cavernous sinus (CS) and further inserted into the aneurysm sac via the rupture point. Coil embolization of both the aneurysm sac and a small part of the CS adjacent to the fistulous site could achieve not only the immediate aneurysm occlusion but also the rupture point obliteration with a small amount of coil mass in the CS. (...) Transvenous Aneurysm Sac and Rupture Point Coil Embolization of Direct Carotid Cavernous Fistula after Pipeline Embolization A delayed aneurysm rupture after flow diverter therapy is a rare but serious complication. Due to the anatomical specificity, a delayed rupture of a carotid cavernous aneurysm may cause a direct carotid cavernous fistula (dCCF). We present a novel therapeutic approach for treatment of dCCF after flow diverter therapy using the Pipeline embolization device (PED). An 86

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2017 NMC Case Report Journal

143. Carotid cavernous fistula after percutaneous balloon compression for trigeminal neuralgia: Endovascular treatment with coils (PubMed)

predispose those complications.A young woman diagnosed with trigeminal neuralgia during 11 years was submitted to a balloon rhizotomy by percutaneous approach to the trigeminal ganglion, with severe intraoperative bleeding. Cavernous syndrome developed few hours later. Magnetic resonance imaging and digital subtraction angiography confirmed an indirect carotid cavernous sinus fistula, which was treated by one session of endovascular procedure using coils, achieving total occlusion of the fistula (...) Carotid cavernous fistula after percutaneous balloon compression for trigeminal neuralgia: Endovascular treatment with coils Percutaneous ganglyolysis treatment of trigeminal neuralgia is rarely associated with vascular complications, such as hematoma, subarachnoid hemorrhage, and stroke. Internal carotid artery injury may also occur after misguided needle placement, particularly far posteriorly or medially, resulting in carotid cavernous fistula. Anatomical variations of the foramen ovale can

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2017 Surgical neurology international

144. Treatment of Barrow type ‘B’ carotid cavernous fistulas with flow diverter stent (Pipeline) (PubMed)

Treatment of Barrow type ‘B’ carotid cavernous fistulas with flow diverter stent (Pipeline) Background Carotid cavernous fistulas (CCFs) Barrow type 'B' are dural shunts between the meningeal branches of the internal carotid artery and the cavernous sinus. The symptoms include vision deterioration, ophthalmoplegia with diplopia, exophthalmos, conjunctival injection, chemosis, ocular bruit, seizures, or neurological deficit. Endovascular treatment remains the gold standard for treatment (...) through the transvenous or transarterial routes. The transvenous approaches have been proved to be the first option. Endovascular access through the superior ophthalmic vein (SOV) or inferior petrosal sinus have been widely used. The problem arises when there is no vascular access. For these cases, different approaches have been described, such as: direct access to the SOV; combining direct access to the SOV along with blind probing of the proximal occluded SOV; and a direct puncture of the cavernous

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2017 The neuroradiology journal

145. Transorbital Approach for Endovascular Occlusion of Carotid-Cavernous Fistulas: Technical Note and Review of the Literature (PubMed)

Transorbital Approach for Endovascular Occlusion of Carotid-Cavernous Fistulas: Technical Note and Review of the Literature Carotid-cavernous fistulas (CCFs) pose an anatomically and physiologically challenging problem for clinicians. The most common method of treatment for these lesions is transvenous endovascular embolization via the inferior petrosal sinus or the facial vein. When transvenous access is not possible, an alternate approach must be devised. We describe a case example

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2017 Cureus

146. A case of diffuse cavernous hemangioma of the appendix: laparoscopic surgery can facilitate diagnosis and treatment (PubMed)

were found on the mucosal surface. Hematoxylin and eosin staining indicated the presence of blood-filled sinus-like spaces largely in the subserosal layer. Immunohistochemistry analysis indicated that CD34-positive cells lined these spaces. Given these findings, we diagnosed the patient with a diffuse cavernous vascular malformation of the appendix.CHA is difficult to diagnose. A laparoscopic approach may be useful for both the diagnosis and treatment of the disease. (...) A case of diffuse cavernous hemangioma of the appendix: laparoscopic surgery can facilitate diagnosis and treatment A cavenous hemangioma of the appendix (CHA) is rare. The clinical pathophysiology and adequate management of a CHA have not been sufficiently explained since reports on CHA are scarce.A 56-year-old woman presented with chronic right lower quadrant pain. Abdominal contrast-enhanced computed tomography revealed a thickened appendix (1.5 cm in diameter) and some focal calcifications

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2017 Surgical Case Reports

147. Carotid cavernous fistula masquerading as delayed suprachoroidal hemorrhage after trabeculectomy (PubMed)

Carotid cavernous fistula masquerading as delayed suprachoroidal hemorrhage after trabeculectomy Objective: Carotid cavernous fistulae (CCFs) are abnormal communications between the cavernous sinus and the carotid arterial system. Based on the etiology, CCFs can be traumatic, spontaneous and rarely iatrogenic. We report an interesting case of new onset CCF associated with shallow choroidal detachment after trabeculectomy surgery. Method: Observational case report Result: A 69-year-old male

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2017 GMS Ophthalmology Cases

148. Superior Ophthalmic Vein Access for Embolization of an Indirect Carotid Cavernous Fistula (PubMed)

Superior Ophthalmic Vein Access for Embolization of an Indirect Carotid Cavernous Fistula Carotid cavernous fistulae (CCF) are defined as abnormal connections between the carotid circulation and cavernous sinus. CCFs can be categorized as being direct or indirect. Direct CCFs are usually associated with trauma, whereas indirect CCFs are associated with revascularization following cavernous sinus thrombosis. We present a case of a 53-year-old male who presented with tinnitus, proptosis (...) with a micropuncture needle and was used to successfully gain access to the cavernous sinus. Multiple coils were placed in the posterior aspect of the sinus until there was complete occlusion of venous flow. Coils were packed up to the posterior aspect of the orbit near the junction of the cavernous sinus with the SOV, and the embolization was successful. Indirect CCFs have gradual onset and are usually low-flow. Low-flow CCFs might improve with medical management.Some CCFs may cause ocular manifestations and can

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2017 Cureus

150. Acute sphenoid sinusitis leading to contralateral cavernous sinus thrombosis: a case report. (PubMed)

Acute sphenoid sinusitis leading to contralateral cavernous sinus thrombosis: a case report. The objective of this article was to report a case of isolated, acute, right-sided sphenoid sinusitis that progressed to contralateral cavernous sinus thrombosis in an 18-year-old male patient. We describe the atypical presentation of this case and discuss the relevant anatomy, pathogenesis, presentation, diagnostic evaluation and treatment.A case report of sphenoid sinusitis leading to contralateral (...) cavernous sinus thrombosis was reviewed and presented along with a comprehensive literature review of the relevant anatomy, pathophysiology, microbiology, diagnostic work-up and treatment options.Cavernous sinus thrombosis is a rare clinical entity in the antibiotic era. However, limited sphenoid sinusitis may progress to cavernous sinus thrombosis in spite of maximal medical treatment, as highlighted in this case report. The mainstay of treatment includes early diagnosis allowing aggressive intravenous

2013 Journal of Laryngology & Otology

151. Rapid-developed primary malignant myoepithelioma in the cavernous sinus: a case report. (PubMed)

Rapid-developed primary malignant myoepithelioma in the cavernous sinus: a case report. Malignant myoepithelioma is a relatively rare malignant tumor occurring most frequently in the salivary glands. A few isolated cases have been described in other locations, including soft tissue, bone, lung, bronchus, oral cavity, nasopharynx, larynx, and maxillary sinus. Malignant myoepithelioma, however, is uncommonly involved within the cavernous sinus. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first (...) report of malignant myoepithelioma arising from within the cavernous sinus.Herein, we report a case of a 48-year-old woman who presented a 1-month history of diplopia and blepharoptosis as well as radiological evidence of a rapidly developing cavernous sinus tumor. The patient underwent a trans-sphenoidal biopsy and a histological diagnosis indicated a malignant myoepithelioma. After diagnosis, the tumor grew rapidly and her clinical condition deteriorated progressively. Therefore, a pterional

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2013 BMC Neurology

152. Single-fraction radiosurgery of benign cavernous sinus meningiomas. (PubMed)

Single-fraction radiosurgery of benign cavernous sinus meningiomas. Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is an important treatment option for patients with cavernous sinus meningiomas (CSM). To analyze factors associated with local tumor control and complications after single-fraction SRS, the authors reviewed cases involving patients treated with Gamma Knife SRS between 1990 and 2008.Excluded were patients with WHO Grade II or III tumors, radiation-induced tumors, multiple meningiomas

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2013 Journal of Neurosurgery

153. Transnasal approach to the orbital apex and cavernous sinus. (PubMed)

Transnasal approach to the orbital apex and cavernous sinus. The aim of this study was to provide the anatomic rationale for a transnasal approach to the orbital apex and cavernous sinus, and to evaluate its applicability and efficiency.One hundred patients with lesions of the orbital apex, cavernous sinus, optic nerve, clivus, parapharyngeal space, infratemporal fossa, or pterygopalatine fossa were reviewed over a 10-year period. All patients underwent an endoscopic transnasal approach (...) to the orbital apex and cavernous sinus. The surgical technique required a standard endoscopic sinus surgery set. The possible complications were recorded and classified as intraoperative or postoperative.There were complications in 8 cases: 4 intraoperative and 4 postoperative. The intraoperative complications included rupture of the internal carotid artery in 1 patient and cerebrospinal fluid leak in 3 patients. All intraoperative complications were resolved during surgery. The postoperative complications

2013 Rhinology and Laryngology

154. Traumatic carotid-cavernous sinus fistula accompanying abducens nerve (VI) palsy in blowout fractures: missed diagnosis of 'white-eyed shunt'. (PubMed)

Traumatic carotid-cavernous sinus fistula accompanying abducens nerve (VI) palsy in blowout fractures: missed diagnosis of 'white-eyed shunt'. We report the case of a 32-year-old woman with bilateral blowout fractures. She presented with diplopia showing impaired abduction of the left eye soon after trauma. No other orbito-ocular signs, such as exophthalmos, ptosis, or chemosis, were found. Orbital reconstruction was performed, but no improvement in her ophthalmoplegia was observed after (...) surgery. A carotid angiography showed that she was suffering from a posteriorly draining carotid-cavernous sinus fistula with isolated abducens nerve palsy. Coil embolization was conducted under the consultation of a neurosurgeon, after which her ophthalmoplegia resolved fully. This is a rare case of posteriorly draining carotid-cavernous sinus fistula without classic orbito-ocular signs, the absence of which may cause diagnostic confusion.Copyright © 2013 International Association of Oral

2013 International Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery

155. Ophthalmic vein compression for selected benign low-flow cavernous sinus dural arteriovenous fistulas. (PubMed)

Ophthalmic vein compression for selected benign low-flow cavernous sinus dural arteriovenous fistulas. Dural arteriovenous fistulas (DAVFs) of the cavernous sinus are acquired arteriovenous shunts between the dural branches of the internal and external carotid arteries and the cavernous sinus. These fistulas may present with cortical venous reflux, but more commonly drain antegradely toward the superior ophthalmic vein (SOV). Transvenous embolization is the most common endovascular treatment (...) , but in some cases transvenous access to the compartment of the shunt may not be possible. In cases with no corticovenous reflux, manual compression of the SOV is an excellent alternative treatment, which is well known but rarely reported in the literature. The authors describe a series of 3 cavernous DAVFs with anterior drainage treated successfully by intermittent manual compression of the SOV.

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2013 Journal of Neurosurgery

156. Endovascular treatment of carotid cavernous sinus fistula: A systematic review. (PubMed)

Endovascular treatment of carotid cavernous sinus fistula: A systematic review. Carotid cavernous sinus fistulas are abnormal communications between the carotid system and the cavernous sinus. Several classification schemes have described carotid cavernous sinus fistulas according to etiology, hemodynamic features, or the angiographic arterial architecture. Increased pressure within the cavernous sinus appears to be the main factor in pathophysiology. The clinical features are related to size (...) , exact location, and duration of the fistula, adequacy and route of venous drainage and the presence of arterial/venous collaterals. Noninvasive imaging (computed tomography, magnetic resonance, computed tomography angiography, magnetic resonance angiography, Doppler) is often used in the initial work-up of a possible carotid cavernous sinus fistulas. Cerebral angiography is the gold standard for the definitive diagnosis, classification, and planning of treatment for these lesions. The endovascular

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2013 World journal of radiology

157. Congenital Pial Arteriovenous Fistula in the Temporal Region Draining into Cavernous Sinus: A Case Report (PubMed)

Congenital Pial Arteriovenous Fistula in the Temporal Region Draining into Cavernous Sinus: A Case Report This report concerns a 4-month-old infant with progressive prominent and redness of his left eye since birth. This report concerns a 4-month-old infant with progressive prominent redness of his left eye since birth. Angiography revealed a congenital pial arteriovenous fistula between the temporal branch of the left posterior cerebral artery and left cavernous sinus through (...) the sphenoparietal sinus, a condition not reported in the literature. The fistula was successfully occluded with two micro-coils by vertebrobasilar approach.

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2013 Korean Journal of Radiology

158. Bilateral Persistent Trigeminal Arteries with Unilateral Trigeminal Artery to Cavernous Sinus Fistula: A Case Report (PubMed)

Bilateral Persistent Trigeminal Arteries with Unilateral Trigeminal Artery to Cavernous Sinus Fistula: A Case Report A 59-year-old man who denied a history of trauma presented with left pulsatile tinnitus and left orbital swelling for six months. Digital subtraction angiography showed a left persistent trigeminal artery (PTA) with a trigeminal artery to cavernous sinus (trigeminal-cavernous sinus) fistula and a right PTA. Transarterial detachable coil embolization of the left trigeminal (...) -cavernous sinus fistula was performed, and the symptoms subsided. There has been no report of bilateral PTAs with a spontaneous fistula connected from one PTA to the ipsilateral cavernous sinus. This paper reports such a rare circumstance.

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2013 Interventional Neuroradiology

159. Furuncle of the Right Nasal Vestibule; Septic Thrombosis of the Cavernous Sinus; Lepto-Meningitis; Death; Autopsy. (With Microscopic Examination of the Orbits, Cavernous Blood Sinuses, Meninges, Ethmoidal and Sphenoidal Air Sinuses) (PubMed)

Furuncle of the Right Nasal Vestibule; Septic Thrombosis of the Cavernous Sinus; Lepto-Meningitis; Death; Autopsy. (With Microscopic Examination of the Orbits, Cavernous Blood Sinuses, Meninges, Ethmoidal and Sphenoidal Air Sinuses) 19984997 2010 06 24 2010 06 24 0035-9157 19 Laryngol Sect 1926 Proceedings of the Royal Society of Medicine Proc. R. Soc. Med. Furuncle of the Right Nasal Vestibule; Septic Thrombosis of the Cavernous Sinus; Lepto-Meningitis; Death; Autopsy. (With Microscopic (...) Examination of the Orbits, Cavernous Blood Sinuses, Meninges, Ethmoidal and Sphenoidal Air Sinuses). 10 Turner A L AL Reynolds F E FE eng Journal Article England Proc R Soc Med 7505890 0035-9157 2009 12 9 6 0 1926 1 1 0 0 1926 1 1 0 1 ppublish 19984997 PMC1948626

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1926 Proceedings of the Royal Society of Medicine

160. Carotid-Cavernous Fistula: A Rare but Treatable Cause of Rapidly Progressive Vision Loss (PubMed)

Service, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Boston (S.K.F.). sbsilverman@partners.org. eng T32 GM007753 GM NIGMS NIH HHS United States Case Reports Journal Article 2016 07 12 United States Stroke 0235266 0039-2499 IM Aged, 80 and over Carotid-Cavernous Sinus Fistula complications diagnostic imaging therapy Cerebral Angiography Embolization, Therapeutic Female Humans Treatment Outcome Vision Disorders diagnostic imaging etiology therapy aneurysm atrial fibrillation carotid artery fistula stroke 2016 (...) Carotid-Cavernous Fistula: A Rare but Treatable Cause of Rapidly Progressive Vision Loss 27406104 2018 03 09 2018 11 13 1524-4628 47 8 2016 08 Stroke Stroke Carotid-Cavernous Fistula: A Rare but Treatable Cause of Rapidly Progressive Vision Loss. e207-9 10.1161/STROKEAHA.116.013428 Gonzalez Castro Luis Nicolas LN From the Department of Neurology (L.N.G.C., R.A.C., S.B.S.) and Department of Radiology (J.D.R.), Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston; Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (A.A.B

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2016 Stroke

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