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Carcinogens in the Workplace

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41. Changes in Work Practices for Safe Use of Formaldehyde in a University-Based Anatomy Teaching and Research Facility Full Text available with Trip Pro

Changes in Work Practices for Safe Use of Formaldehyde in a University-Based Anatomy Teaching and Research Facility Anatomy teaching and research relies on the use of formaldehyde (FA) as a preservation agent for human and animal tissues. Due to the recent classification of FA as a carcinogen, university hospitals are facing a challenge to (further) reduce exposure to FA. The aim of this study was to reduce exposure to FA in the anatomy teaching and research facility. Workers participated (...) campaigns to assess the effect of these new work practices on inhalation exposure to FA. Samples were collected over 8 h (full shift) and 15 min (task-based) to support mitigation of exposure and improvement of work practices. Air was collected on an adsorbent coated with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH) and analyzed by HPLC-UV. Geometric mean (GM) concentrations of FA in the breathing zone over a work-shift were 123 µg/m³ in 2012 and 114 µg/m³ in 2014, exceeding the workplace standard of 150 µg/m³ (8

2018 International journal of environmental research and public health

42. DNA methylation of the cancer-related genes F2RL3 and AHRR is associated with occupational exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons Full Text available with Trip Pro

DNA methylation of the cancer-related genes F2RL3 and AHRR is associated with occupational exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons Some polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) are known carcinogens and workplace PAH exposure may increase the risk of cancer. Monitoring early cancer-related changes can indicate whether the exposure is carcinogenic. Here, we enrolled 151 chimney sweeps, 152 controls and 19 creosote-exposed male workers from Sweden. We measured urinary PAH metabolites using LC

2018 Carcinogenesis

43. Risk assessment for metalworking fluids and cancer outcomes Full Text available with Trip Pro

workplace MWF exposure of 0.1 mg/m3 over a 45 years working life, the risk of attributable cancer was 3.7% or, excluding the less certain female cancers, 3.1%.Substantial cancer risks occurred at 0.1 mg/m3 MWF, one fourth of the current NIOSH recommended exposure limit for MWF total particulate. Because ingredients in current MWF remain from earlier formulations, it is likely that some MWF carcinogenicity persists today. Although important changes have occurred, newer agents are being continually

2018 American Journal of Industrial Medicine

44. Environmental asbestos exposure and mesothelioma cases in Bari, Apulia region, southern Italy: a national interest site for land reclamation Full Text available with Trip Pro

Environmental asbestos exposure and mesothelioma cases in Bari, Apulia region, southern Italy: a national interest site for land reclamation Asbestos is an environmental carcinogen, and asbestos-related diseases are a global-scale public health issue. We report three cases (one male and two females) of pleural malignant mesothelioma (PMM) caused by environmental asbestos exposure reported by the Apulia Regional Operating Centre (COR) to the National Mesothelioma Registry (ReNaM). The patients (...) revealed no history of asbestos exposure even after detailed assessment. The environmental (neighborhood) asbestos exposure for each of the three cases was due to both the residential history of the subjects and their workplace, close to a military barracks, at a distance of between 45 and 100 m. Moreover, in addition to this new source of pollution, an asbestos cement factory was located in the urban area of Bari municipality, in the Apulia region, southern Italy. Environmental-residential

2018 Environmental science and pollution research international

45. Radiation-related occupational cancer and its recognition criteria in South Korea Full Text available with Trip Pro

Radiation-related occupational cancer and its recognition criteria in South Korea Ionizing radiation is a well-known carcinogen, and is listed as one carcinogenic agent of occupational cancer. Given the increase in the number of workers exposed to radiation, as well as the increase in concern regarding occupational cancer, the number of radiation-related occupational cancer claims is expected to increase. Unlike exposure assessment of other carcinogenic agents in the workplace, such as asbestos (...) and benzene, radiation exposure is usually assessed on an individual basis with personal dosimeters, which makes it feasible to assess whether a worker's cancer occurrence is associated with their individual exposure. However, given the absence of a threshold dose for cancer initiation, it remains difficult to identify radiation exposure as the root cause of occupational cancer. Moreover, the association between cancer and radiation exposure in the workplace has not been clearly established due to a lack

2018 Annals of occupational and environmental medicine

46. Radon Levels in Indoor Environments of the University Hospital in Bari-Apulia Region Southern Italy Full Text available with Trip Pro

Radon Levels in Indoor Environments of the University Hospital in Bari-Apulia Region Southern Italy Since 1988, the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) has classified radon among the compounds for which there is scientific evidence of carcinogenicity for humans (group 1). The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends a reference radon level between 100 and 300 Bq/m³ for homes. The objective of this study is to measure the radon concentrations in 401 workplaces, different from (...) ³ vs. August/January 55.0 Bq/m³). An average concentration of radon lower than the WHO reference level (100 Bq/m³) is detected in 76.1% of monitored environments, while higher than 300 Bq/m³ only in the 0.9%. Most workplaces report radon concentrations within the WHO reference level, therefore, the risk to workers' health deriving from occupational exposure to radon can be considered to be low. Nevertheless, the goal is to achieve near-zero exposures to protect workers' health.

2018 International journal of environmental research and public health

47. Prevention of skin cancer

details of the induction, promotion and progression of skin cancer in humans have been elucidated. Consensus strength: 96.2% R. Greinert, B. Volkmer In 2009, the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) classified solar and artificial ultraviolet radiation (UV radiation) used in solariums as a class I carcinogen (“carcinogenic to humans”) [4]. This categorisation was made without any restriction as to specific wavelength ranges (UVA, UVB) because of the proven epidemiological and basic

2014 German Guideline Program in Oncology

48. Concepts Series 11 - The built environment and health: an evidence review

of respiratory illness, gastrointestinal illness and high blood pressure, and many of the chemical contaminants found in flood water are carcinogenic 25,26 . The adverse effects of flooding are also likely to be felt through the increased prevalence of mental health symptoms in flooding victims 27 , including depression, post-traumatic stress disorder and anxiety 28 . Vulnerable groups are more likely to be affected, and may have fewer resources to deal with the aftermath 29,30 . Possible policy or practice (...) 51 . Similar factors to those relevant within the home can be attributed to other buildings where people have regular and prolonged contact (e.g. schools, hospitals and workplaces), although conditions within these places may be required to meet minimum standards. Although some attention has been accorded to the impact of hospitals 52-54 and care settings 55 on mental wellbeing and recovery, evidence on the impact of the workplace on health and wellbeing remains sparse 56 . 3.2 Neighbourhoods

2013 Glasgow Centre for Population Health

49. Clinical Practice Guidelines for Healthy Eating for the Prevention and Treatment of Metabolic and Endocrine Diseases in Adults: Cosponsored by American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists/American College of Endocrinology and The Obesity Society

, and prediabetes are marginalized from this important component of health care. Other obstacles to implementing healthy eating strate- gies on a large scale include: • unawareness of the importance of health promo- tion and wellness care in the general population to prevent disease, including endocrine and meta- bolic disorders, • the relative paucity of healthy nutritional prin- ciples and eating patterns taught in American schools, higher education institutions, and even workplaces, • the relative scarcity

2013 American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists

50. Review of Guidelines for Shock Chlorination in Private Wells

and Newman 35 noted the transient production of low levels of DBPs (e.g., trihalomethanes and haloacetic acids), which are suspected carcinogens when long-term, continuous exposure occurs. However, the levels of 4 both metals and DBPs decreased rapidly in parallel with free chlorine concentration. 35 These results emphasize the importance of thoroughly flushing the well and testing for free chlorine, both for dose verification and purging, rather than relying on the smell of chlorine alone. The fear (...) /shock.html. 26. Government of British Columbia. Water well disinfection using the simple chlorination method. Victoria: Government of British Columbia; 2008. 27. Health Canada. Environmental and Workplace Health. What’s in your well? A guide to well water treatment and maintenance. Ottawa: Health Canada; 2004 [cited 2013 Nov 5]; http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/ewh-semt/pubs/water- eau/well-puits-eng.php. 28. Schnieders JH. Coliforms and disinfection of water wells. Water Well Journal. 2001(October). 29. Advanced

2013 National Collaborating Centre for Environmental Health

51. Whatever happened to Dr. Daniel Neides, a year after he was forced to leave the Cleveland Clinic because of his antivaccine rant?

and recover from it. We have found that many vaccines, including the flu shot, contain extremely harmful ingredients…mercury and aluminum in high concentrations…potent neurotoxins, and formaldehyde, a known carcinogen. Nearly all vaccines contain dangerous….possibly cancer-causing contaminants from the animal matter that is used make them. We are not against safe and effective vaccines. But we believe adequate testing has not been done, particularly of the synergistic effects of many vaccines taken within (...) a short period of time, and taken too early in life. We support Dr. Neides. We wish there were more ethical decent real doctors like him. …mercury and aluminum in high concentrations…potent neurotoxins, and formaldehyde, a known carcinogen. 1) The concentrations are low. 2) The mercury and aluminium are not elemental but in compounds. 3) There is more aluminium in a single banana than in the entire vaccination schedule. 4) There is more formaldehyde in one apple than in the entire vaccine schedule

2018 Respectful Insolence

52. Basal Cell Carcinoma

of Origin and molecular pathway of transformation The cell of origin for BCC is still not totally clear. Whereas it was long thought to arise from the hair follicle bulge stem cell (33), a recent paper has stated instead that BCC stem cells were located in the interfollicular epidermis and in the infundibulum but not in the hair bulge (34). It can be hypothesized that different stem cell compartments can be targeted according to the carcinogenic agent involved. Diagnosis French guidelines are the only

2012 European Dermatology Forum

53. Determination of crystalline silica in respirable dust upon occupational exposure for Egyptian workers Full Text available with Trip Pro

Determination of crystalline silica in respirable dust upon occupational exposure for Egyptian workers Crystalline free silica is considered as a lung carcinogen and the occupational exposure to its dust is a health hazard to workers employed in industries that involve ores of mineral dust. In Egypt, thousands of people work under conditions of silica dust exposure exceeding the occupational exposure limit, as a result the monitoring of this occupational exposure to crystalline silica dust (...) is required by government legislation. The assessment of the later is a multi-phase process, depend on workplace measurements, quantitative analyses of samples, and comparison of results with the permissible limits. This study aims to investigate occupational exposure to crystalline silica dust at 22 factories in Egypt with different industrial activities like stone cutting, glass making, ceramic, and sand blasting. Dust samples were collected from work sites at the breathing zone using a personal

2017 Industrial health

54. Occupational exposure to diesel engine exhaust and alterations in immune/inflammatory markers: a cross-sectional molecular epidemiology study in China Full Text available with Trip Pro

Occupational exposure to diesel engine exhaust and alterations in immune/inflammatory markers: a cross-sectional molecular epidemiology study in China The relationship between diesel engine exhaust (DEE), a known lung carcinogen, and immune/inflammatory markers that have been prospectively associated with lung cancer risk is not well understood. To provide insight into these associations, we conducted a cross-sectional molecular epidemiology study of 54 males highly occupationally exposed (...) to DEE and 55 unexposed male controls from representative workplaces in China. We measured plasma levels of 64 immune/inflammatory markers in all subjects using Luminex bead-based assays, and compared our findings to those from a nested case-control study of these markers and lung cancer risk, which had been conducted among never-smoking women in Shanghai using the same multiplex panels. Levels of nine markers that were associated with lung cancer risk in the Shanghai study were altered in DEE

2017 Carcinogenesis

55. Priority Setting for Occupational Cancer Prevention Full Text available with Trip Pro

) the likelihood of presence and/or use in Canadian workplaces; (2) toxicity of the substance (strength of evidence for carcinogenicity and other health effects); (3) feasibility of producing a carcinogen profile and/or an occupational estimate; and (4) special interest from the public/scientific community. Carcinogens were ranked as high, medium or low priority based on specific conditions regarding these criteria, and stakeholder input was incorporated. Priorities were set separately for the creation of new (...) Priority Setting for Occupational Cancer Prevention Selecting priority occupational carcinogens is important for cancer prevention efforts; however, standardized selection methods are not available. The objective of this paper was to describe the methods used by CAREX Canada in 2015 to establish priorities for preventing occupational cancer, with a focus on exposure estimation and descriptive profiles.Four criteria were used in an expert assessment process to guide carcinogen prioritization: (1

2017 Safety and health at work

56. Exposure to 4,4'-methylene bis (2-chloroaniline) (MbOCA) in New South Wales, Australia Full Text available with Trip Pro

monitoring of the work environment and biological monitoring of the workers' exposure to MbOCA at nine workplaces in NSW.The air monitoring results for MbOCA gave a geometric mean (GM) of 0.06 μg/m3 and a geometric standard deviation (GSD) of 2.70 and a 95% confidence interval of 0.29 μg/m3. The surface contamination in the main work area showed the highest contamination with a GM of 74 ng/cm2 and a GSD of 17 and a 95% confidence interval of 7,751 ng/cm2. Biological monitoring showed a GM of 0.89 μmol (...) , and it was also recommended to improve the awareness of the workers to the adverse effects to their health of exposure to this carcinogen.

2017 Journal of occupational health

57. Current and new challenges in occupational lung diseases Full Text available with Trip Pro

Current and new challenges in occupational lung diseases Occupational lung diseases are an important public health issue and are avoidable through preventive interventions in the workplace. Up-to-date knowledge about changes in exposure to occupational hazards as a result of technological and industrial developments is essential to the design and implementation of efficient and effective workplace preventive measures. New occupational agents with unknown respiratory health effects (...) are constantly introduced to the market and require periodic health surveillance among exposed workers to detect early signs of adverse respiratory effects. In addition, the ageing workforce, many of whom have pre-existing respiratory conditions, poses new challenges in terms of the diagnosis and management of occupational lung diseases. Primary preventive interventions aimed to reduce exposure levels in the workplace remain pivotal for elimination of the occupational lung disease burden. To achieve

2017 European respiratory review : an official journal of the European Respiratory Society

58. Minimum standards on prevention, diagnosis and treatment of occupational and work-related skin diseases in Europe - position paper of the COST Action StanDerm (TD 1206). Full Text available with Trip Pro

for early diagnosis, essential for individual patient management, should be based on existing guidelines and include a multidisciplinary approach. Patch testing is essential if contact dermatitis persists or relapses. Workplace exposure assessment of WRSD/OSD requires full labelling of product ingredients on material safety data sheets helping to identify allergens, irritants and skin carcinogens. Comparable standards in primary, secondary and tertiary prevention must be established in Europe to reduce

2017 Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology

59. Lung Cancer Prevention (PDQ®): Health Professional Version

in risk for low levels of exposure and greater increases in risk for high levels of exposure. Study Design : Cohort and case-control studies. Internal Validity : Fair. Consistency : Good. External Validity : Good. Occupational exposure to lung carcinogens Based on solid evidence, workplace exposure to asbestos, arsenic, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, and nickel increases lung cancer incidence and mortality. Magnitude of Effect : Increased risk, large magnitude (more than fivefold). Risks follow a dose (...) . Reducing or eliminating occupational exposure to lung carcinogens Based on solid evidence, occupational exposures such as asbestos, arsenic, nickel, and chromium are causally associated with lung cancer. Reducing or eliminating workplace exposures to known lung carcinogens would be expected to result in a corresponding decrease in the risk of lung cancer. Magnitude of Effect : Decreased risk, with a larger effect, the greater the reduction in exposure. Study Design : Cohort and case-control studies

2016 PDQ - NCI's Comprehensive Cancer Database

60. Cancer Genetics Risk Assessment and Counseling (PDQ®): Health Professional Version

at diagnosis. Pathology findings/staging. Prior genetic testing results. Prior tumor testing results (including genomic profiling). (Refer to the section in the PDQ summary for more information about the implications of tumor testing.) Treatment (e.g., surgery, chemotherapy, radiation therapy, targeted therapy), including whether genetic risk assessment may affect treatment. Bilaterality of disease, if applicable. Current plan. Carcinogenic exposures (e.g., alcohol and tobacco use, sun exposure, radiation (...) to these cancers. Current age (if living). Age at death and cause of death (if deceased). Carcinogenic exposures (e.g., alcohol and tobacco use, sun exposure, radiation exposure, asbestos exposure) or other known cancer site-specific risk factors. Prior germline genetic testing results. Prior tumor testing results (including genomic profiling). Other significant health problems. For relatives not with cancer, collect the following information: Current age or age at death. Cause of death (if deceased). History

2016 PDQ - NCI's Comprehensive Cancer Database

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