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Carcinogens in the Workplace

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21. What does the evidence say about employee sleep??

What does the evidence say about employee sleep?? Knowledge & Library Services (KLS) Evidence Briefing What does the evidence say about employee sleep and workplace interventions to improve sleep? Anh Tran 26 th May 2017 What does the evidence say about employee sleep and workplace interventions to improve sleep? KLS Evidence Briefing 26 th May 2017 Question This briefing summarises the evidence on employee sleep and workplace interventions to improve sleep. Key messages ? There is a lack (...) , Medline and Scopus, from 2007-2017 31 highly relevant citations were used to produce this evidence briefing. 58 additional papers were considered to be ‘of interest’ and details can be obtained on request. What does the evidence say about employee sleep and workplace interventions to improve sleep? KLS Evidence Briefing 26 th May 2017 Background The 24-hour society, working long hours, shift work and sleep apnoea are the main causes of sleep deprivation and poor quality sleep amongst employees

2017 Public Health England - Evidence Briefings

22. Muscle-invasive and Metastatic Bladder Cancer

cancer. Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys, 2012. 83: 953. 28. Zamora-Ros, R., et al. Flavonoid and lignan intake in relation to bladder cancer risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study. Br J Cancer, 2014. 29. Schistosomes, liver flukes and Helicobacter pylori. IARC Working Group on the Evaluation of Carcinogenic Risks to Humans. Lyon, 7-14 June 1994. IARC Monogr Eval Carcinog Risks Hum, 1994. 61: 1. 30. Gouda, I., et al. Bilharziasis and bladder cancer: a time

2018 European Association of Urology

23. Breastfeeding - Promoting and Supporting the Initiation, Exclusivity, and Continuation of Breastfeeding in Newborns, Infants and Young Children

, and peers. Types of Recommendations: The recommendations in this Guideline apply to clinical care in a range of community and health-care settings. One recommendation (Recommendation 4.3) refers to breastfeeding and the workplace and is applicable to employers. All of the recommendations are based on findings from systematic reviews on the most effective clinical interventions and educational approaches for nurses, the interprofessional team, and organization and system policy strategies to support (...) , and other life-threatening ailments Protection obesity & Protection against such as asthma and diabetes FORMULA WHAT? WHAT? WHAT? HOW? HOW? HOW? HOW? Strengthen the monitoring, enforcement and legislation related to the International Code of Marketing of Breastmilk Substitutes breastmilk nothing but best start Babies who are fed from birth through their rst 6 months of life get the Enact six-months mandatory paid maternity leave and policies that encourage women to breastfeed in the workplace

2018 Registered Nurses' Association of Ontario

24. Integrating Tobacco Interventions into Daily Practice

, a discussion of harmful substances in tobacco and motivational interviewing (MI) follows. Harmful Substances in Tobacco Tobacco smoke contains more than 7,000 chemicals. Hundreds of these chemicals are toxic and at least 69 are known carcinogens (Eriksen, Mackay, & Ross, 2012). Despite the known health risks associated with tobacco use and the addictive nature of nicotine, the tobacco industry dilutes this evidence in their marketing strategies. Nicotine is the addictive component in tobacco leaves

2017 Registered Nurses' Association of Ontario

25. HTA of smoking cessation interventions

. There has been a general trend of reducing prevalence since the 1970s. A number of legislative or policy interventions have been made in Ireland to reduce exposure to smoke and smoking. These include the bans on advertising, sales to minors, workplace smoking, and smoking in cars carrying minors. These policies are likely to have impacted on smoking either by reducing uptake, encouraging quit attempts or by reducing the quantity of cigarettes smoked. Population-level interventions support a move

2017 Health Information and Quality Authority

26. Guidelines for care of patients with actinic keratosis

of the patient and previous treatments tried. Added to this is the large number of therapeutic agents, their modes of application and the ?exibility with which each agent can be used. Given this backdrop, it is to be expected that there is variation in clinical practice. Table 2 attempts to bring a broad perspective to the options. In some instances it might be viewed in combination with Table 3, which is an approxi- mation of a simpli?ed cost–bene?t analysis. 8.1 General Lifestyle, dietary fat, 56 workplace

2017 British Association of Dermatologists

27. Smoke-free spaces on the island of Ireland - Snapshot Report 2016

in the workplace which was first introduced in 2004. Legislation prohibiting smoking in cars where children are present has been developed in the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland. In Northern Ireland, recent trends suggest that rules on smoking in the home have become more stringent over time. However, those living in the most deprived areas still experience greater exposure to SHS. In the Republic of Ireland, survey findings indicate slightly stricter rules around smoking in the home, compared (...) ), 2015). In the Republic of Ireland, 23% of the population aged 15 and over are smokers (Department of Health, 2015). SHS is harmful to everyone and is classified as a Group 1 carcinogen. Reducing the exposure of the population to SHS is a core element of the World Health Organization Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (WHO, 2003). Children are especially vulnerable to harms associated with exposure as they are often unable to remove themselves from a smoking environment (Öberg et al, 2010

2017 Institute of Public Health in Ireland

28. Smoking: harm reduction

and carcinogens in tobacco smoke – not the nicotine – that cause illness and death. The best way to reduce these illnesses and deaths is to stop smoking. In general, stopping in one step (sometimes called 'abrupt quitting') offers the best chance of lasting success (see NICE guidance on smoking cessation). However, there are other ways of reducing the harm from smoking, even though this may involve continued use of nicotine. This guidance is about helping people, particularly those who are highly dependent (...) and police stations. What action should the What action should they tak y take? e? Ensure staff with health and social care or custodial responsibilities do not smoke during working hours in locations where the people in their care are not allowed to smoke. Ensure systems are in place for staff who smoke to receive advice and guidance on how to stop smoking in one step (see recommendation 3, also see NICE guidance on workplace interventions to promote smoking cessation). If, after discussion, the person

2013 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

29. Smokeless tobacco: South Asian communities

to these products by the names used locally. A number of the products contain areca nut, a mildly euphoric stimulant which is addictive and carcinogenic in its own right. (Any chewable products that do not contain tobacco are the responsibility of the Food Standards Agency. The Agency is currently working with UK Asian communities to provide guidance on how to minimise the risk from consuming products containing areca nut.) Specialist tobacco cessation services Specialist tobacco cessation services (...) with other women. This is the case, even after controlling for the effect of socioeconomic deprivation (Moles et al. 2008). Areca nut, which is often mixed in with South Asian varieties of smokeless tobacco, is also likely to be linked to the prevalence of oral cancer among this group. Areca is a mildly euphoric stimulant. It is addictive and carcinogenic in its own right – and is widely used among South Asian groups (Auluck et al. 2009; Warnakulasuriya 2002). Survey results (Moles et al. 2008; Prabhu et

2012 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

30. Lung Cancer Prevention (PDQ®): Health Professional Version

in risk for low levels of exposure and greater increases in risk for high levels of exposure. Study Design : Cohort and case-control studies. Internal Validity : Fair. Consistency : Good. External Validity : Good. Occupational exposure to lung carcinogens Based on solid evidence, workplace exposure to asbestos, arsenic, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, and nickel increases lung cancer incidence and mortality. Magnitude of Effect : Increased risk, large magnitude (more than fivefold). Risks follow a dose (...) . Reducing or eliminating occupational exposure to lung carcinogens Based on solid evidence, occupational exposures such as asbestos, arsenic, nickel, and chromium are causally associated with lung cancer. Reducing or eliminating workplace exposures to known lung carcinogens would be expected to result in a corresponding decrease in the risk of lung cancer. Magnitude of Effect : Decreased risk, with a larger effect, the greater the reduction in exposure. Study Design : Cohort and case-control studies

2018 PDQ - NCI's Comprehensive Cancer Database

31. Cancer Genetics Risk Assessment and Counseling (PDQ®): Health Professional Version

treatment. Bilaterality of disease, if applicable. Current plan. Carcinogenic exposures (e.g., alcohol and tobacco use, sun exposure, radiation exposure, asbestos exposure) or other known cancer site-specific risk factors. How the cancer was detected (e.g., self-exam, screening test, presenting symptoms) may also be assessed. Physical examination In some cases, a physical exam is conducted by a qualified medical professional to determine whether the individual has physical findings suggestive (...) in a premenopausal woman significantly reduces the risk of ovarian and breast cancers. This may mask underlying hereditary predisposition to these cancers. Current age (if living). Age at death and cause of death (if deceased). Carcinogenic exposures (e.g., alcohol and tobacco use, sun exposure, radiation exposure, asbestos exposure) or other known cancer site-specific risk factors. Prior germline genetic testing results. Prior tumor testing results (including genomic profiling). Other significant health

2018 PDQ - NCI's Comprehensive Cancer Database

32. Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Health Professional Version

: History of or current tobacco use: cigarettes, pipes, and cigars.[ ] Exposure to cancer-causing substances in secondhand smoke.[ , ] Occupational exposure to asbestos, arsenic, chromium, beryllium, nickel, and other agents.[ ] Radiation exposure from any of the following: - Radiation therapy to the breast or chest.[ ] - Radon exposure in the home or workplace.[ ] - Medical imaging tests, such as computed tomography (CT) scans.[ ] - Atomic bomb radiation.[ ] Living in an area with air pollution (...) Oncol 24 (28): 4539-44, 2006. [ ] American Cancer Society: Cancer Facts and Figures 2018. Atlanta, Ga: American Cancer Society, 2018. . Last accessed September 26, 2019. Alberg AJ, Ford JG, Samet JM, et al.: Epidemiology of lung cancer: ACCP evidence-based clinical practice guidelines (2nd edition). Chest 132 (3 Suppl): 29S-55S, 2007. [ ] Tulunay OE, Hecht SS, Carmella SG, et al.: Urinary metabolites of a tobacco-specific lung carcinogen in nonsmoking hospitality workers. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers

2018 PDQ - NCI's Comprehensive Cancer Database

33. Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Health Professional Version

cancer include the following: History of or current tobacco use: cigarettes, pipes, and cigars.[ ] Exposure to cancer-causing substances in secondhand smoke.[ , ] Occupational exposure to asbestos, arsenic, chromium, beryllium, nickel, and other agents.[ ] Radiation exposure from any of the following: - Radiation therapy to the breast or chest.[ ] - Radon exposure in the home or workplace.[ ] - Medical imaging tests, such as computed tomography (CT) scans.[ ] - Atomic bomb radiation.[ ] Living (...) practice guidelines (2nd edition). Chest 132 (3 Suppl): 29S-55S, 2007. [ ] Tulunay OE, Hecht SS, Carmella SG, et al.: Urinary metabolites of a tobacco-specific lung carcinogen in nonsmoking hospitality workers. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 14 (5): 1283-6, 2005. [ ] Anderson KE, Kliris J, Murphy L, et al.: Metabolites of a tobacco-specific lung carcinogen in nonsmoking casino patrons. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 12 (12): 1544-6, 2003. [ ] Straif K, Benbrahim-Tallaa L, Baan R, et al.: A review

2018 PDQ - NCI's Comprehensive Cancer Database

36. Clinical Guideline for the Diagnosis of Beryllium Sensitization and Chronic Beryllium Disease

with leading experts in the field. This Guideline does not address exposure prevention, workplace safety, or treatment. In addition, this Guideline is not intended to supplant all adjudicative decisions in cases that meet the case definition and which are crucial to the administration of the Washington workers’ compensation system. BACKGROUND Beryllium is a lightweight alkaline metal occurring naturally in soils and in coal; [1] it is processed into metals oxides, alloys, and composite materials. [2 (...) .” For example, exposure to beryllium may be an acute, traumatic episode at work, such as a puncture wound from beryllium metal. Page 2 Beryllium sensitization and chronic beryllium disease as an occupational disease: For an occupational disease, establishing work-relatedness requires a more critical analysis that demonstrates more than a simple association between the disease and workplace activities. Establishing work-relatedness for an occupational disease requires all of the following: a. Exposure

2015 Washington State Department of Labor and Industries

38. Effective Indoor Air Interventions

literature. Only English language literature was reviewed. Articles were restricted to interventions in residences and public buildings, including schools, daycares, and offices. Hospitals and industrial workplaces were excluded because they are governed under different regulations and standards. Laboratory tests are not covered in the review. Inclusion criteria for studies were that it should evaluate both environmental and health measures. For example, a study must assess indoor air contaminants or IAQ (...) prevalence of smoking; 43% of First Nations adults are daily smokers compared to 17% of the general Canadian population. 20 An indoor air quality intervention study in a First Nations community found 73% of the participants were exposed to SHS in the home. 21 A smoke-free policy is a population-level intervention that can ban smoking in indoor public spaces, workplaces, and nearby public building entrances. Smoke-free policies have been credited with improving the respiratory and cardiovascular health

2015 National Collaborating Centre for Environmental Health

39. The current burden of cancer attributable to occupational exposures in Canada. (Abstract)

between 1961 and 2001, to at least one carcinogen in the workplace. Overall, we estimated that in 2011, between 3.9% (95% CI: 3.1%-8.1%) and 4.2% (95% CI: 3.3%-8.7%) of all incident cases of cancer were due to occupational exposure, corresponding to lower and upper numbers of 7700-21,800 cases. Five of the cancer sites - mesothelioma, non-melanoma skin cancer, lung, female breast, and urinary bladder - account for a total of 7600 to 21,200 cancers attributable to occupational exposures such as solar (...) The current burden of cancer attributable to occupational exposures in Canada. Exposure to occupational carcinogens is often overlooked as a contributor to the burden of cancer. To estimate the proportion of cancer cases attributable to occupational exposure in Canada in 2011, exposure prevalence and levels of 44 carcinogens were informed by data from the Canadian carcinogen exposure surveillance project (CAREX Canada). These were used with Canadian Census (between 1961 and 2011) and Labour

2019 Preventive Medicine

40. Risk factors for lung cancer

of never smokers 31 26 Table 4.3 Differences in RR estimate of lung cancer in current smokers dependent on the study design used 31 26 Table 4.4 Dose response RR estimates for lung cancer in current smoking men and women 31 27 Table 4.5 Risk of lung cancer with workplace exposure to environmental tobacco smoke 32 27 Table 4.6 Relative risk of lung cancer in never smoking men alone and both genders when exposed to environmental smoke from their spouse 33 28 Table 4.7 Second hand smoke (ETS) exposure (...) of factors, known as risk factors. Risk factors can include behaviours (such as tobacco smoking), chemical agents in the environment or the workplace (such as asbestos, arsenic or radon) or a family history of cancer. Some risk factors are modifiable, meaning the risk can be altered by changing behaviour or adopting safety measures. Other risk factors, such as age, are regarded as non-modifiable. This report presents the detailed outcomes of a systematic review conducted by the Joanna Briggs Institute

2014 Cancer Australia

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