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Carcinogens in the Workplace

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1. Carcinogens in the Workplace

Carcinogens in the Workplace Carcinogens in the Workplace Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Carcinogens in the Workplace (...) Carcinogens in the Workplace Aka: Carcinogens in the Workplace , Occupational Exposures Linked to Cancer , Cancer-predisposing Occupational Exposure II. Causes: Carcinogens Aniline and homologs ( s) Beryllium Silica Chromium Cadmium Coal tar pitch volatile substances Diesel exhaust fumes Dinitrotoluenes Benzene (gasoline) Ethylene oxide Ionizing radiation Nickel Silica crystals smoke III. Resources CDC NIOSH Carcinogen List Images: Related links to external sites (from Bing) These images are a random

2018 FP Notebook

2. Toxicological risk at workplace and toxicity as Life Cycle Assessment impact category: Substitution of solvents as an example (PubMed)

naphthas were replaced by n-Butylacetate, 1-Ethoxy-2-propyl acetate and Ethyl-3-ethoxy propionate. In the European Union, the naphthas are classified as mutagens and carcinogens category 1, officially. However, if benzene is below 0.1 %, registrants in the EU proposed to omit this classification, and todays naptha products on the market obviously have benzene contents below 0.1 %. On a first glance, the improvement for workplace safety introduced by the substitution, therefore, is comparatively small (...) Toxicological risk at workplace and toxicity as Life Cycle Assessment impact category: Substitution of solvents as an example Substitution of hazardous substances against less hazardous ones is a central requirement of the European Chemical Regulation REACH (European Regulation 1907/2006/EC). Hazardous substances emitted from products may not only affect the worker; drift off and distribution in the environment may finally result in exposure of the general population. This potential threat

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2017 EXCLI journal

3. Low-dose computed tomography screening for lung cancer in people with workplace exposure to asbestos. (PubMed)

Low-dose computed tomography screening for lung cancer in people with workplace exposure to asbestos. Smoking is the main risk factor for lung cancer, but environmental and occupational exposure to carcinogens also increase lung cancer risk. We assessed whether extending low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) screening to persons with occupational exposure to asbestos may be an effective way reducing lung cancer mortality.We conducted a nested case-control study within the COSMOS screening program

2019 Lung Cancer

4. Identifying occupational carcinogens: an update from the IARC Monographs (PubMed)

in the pertinent monograph. The number of known occupational carcinogens has increased over time: 47 agents were identified as known occupational carcinogens in 2017 compared with 28 in 2004. These estimates are conservative and likely underestimate the number of carcinogenic agents present in workplaces. Exposure to these agents causes a wide range of cancers; cancers of the lung and other respiratory sites, followed by skin, account for the largest proportion. The dominant routes of exposure are inhalation (...) and dermal contact. Important progress has been made in identifying occupational carcinogens; nevertheless, there is an ongoing need for research on the causes of work-related cancer. Most workplace exposures have not been evaluated for their carcinogenic potential due to inadequate epidemiologic evidence and a paucity of quantitative exposure data.© Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless

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2018 Occupational and environmental medicine

5. Adverse health effects of asbestos: solving mysteries regarding asbestos carcinogenicity based on follow-up survey of a Chinese factory (PubMed)

Adverse health effects of asbestos: solving mysteries regarding asbestos carcinogenicity based on follow-up survey of a Chinese factory The present review summarizes the results of several follow-up studies assessing an asbestos product manufacturing plant in Chongqing, China, and discusses three controversial issues related to the carcinogenicity of asbestos. The first issue is the amphibole hypothesis, which asserts that the carcinogenicity of asbestos is limited to amphiboles (...) , such as crocidolite, but not serpentines, such as chrysotile. However, considering the possible multiple component of asbestos carcinogenicity in the presence of tobacco smoke or other carcinogens, chrysotile cannot be regarded as non-carcinogenic. Additionally, in a practical sense, it is not possible to assume "pure" chrysotile due to its ubiquitous contamination with tremolite, which is a type of amphibole. Thus, as the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) assessed, all forms of asbestos

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2018 Environmental health and preventive medicine

6. Prioritising action on occupational carcinogens in Europe: a socioeconomic and health impact assessment. (PubMed)

Prioritising action on occupational carcinogens in Europe: a socioeconomic and health impact assessment. Work-related cancer is an important public health issue with a large financial impact on society. The key European legislative instrument is the Carcinogens and Mutagens Directive (2004/37/EC). In preparation for updating the Directive, the European Commission commissioned a study to provide a socioeconomic, health and environmental impact assessment.The evaluation was undertaken for 25 (...) preselected hazardous substances or mixtures. Estimates were made of the number of cases of cancer attributable to workplace exposure, both currently and in the future, with and without any regulatory interventions, and these data were used to estimate the financial health costs and benefits.It was estimated that if no action is taken there will be >700 000 attributable cancer deaths over the next 60 years for the substances assessed. However, there are only seven substances where the data suggest a clear

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2017 British Journal of Cancer

7. Quantification of N-phenyl-2-naphthylamine by gas chromatography and isotope-dilution mass spectrometry and its percutaneous absorption ex vivo under workplace conditions (PubMed)

Quantification of N-phenyl-2-naphthylamine by gas chromatography and isotope-dilution mass spectrometry and its percutaneous absorption ex vivo under workplace conditions N-Phenyl-2-naphthylamine (P2NA) is an antioxidant used to protect rubbers from flex-cracking. P2NA can be converted in vivo to 2NA, one of the most potent bladder carcinogens. Here, we report the specific and ultra-sensitive quantification of P2NA in the receptor fluid of Franz diffusion cells by gas chromatography and isotope

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2017 Archives of toxicology

8. Carcinogens in the Workplace

Carcinogens in the Workplace Carcinogens in the Workplace Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Carcinogens in the Workplace (...) Carcinogens in the Workplace Aka: Carcinogens in the Workplace , Occupational Exposures Linked to Cancer , Cancer-predisposing Occupational Exposure II. Causes: Carcinogens Aniline and homologs ( s) Beryllium Silica Chromium Cadmium Coal tar pitch volatile substances Diesel exhaust fumes Dinitrotoluenes Benzene (gasoline) Ethylene oxide Ionizing radiation Nickel Silica crystals smoke III. Resources CDC NIOSH Carcinogen List Images: Related links to external sites (from Bing) These images are a random

2015 FP Notebook

9. Risk assessment of di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate in the workplace (PubMed)

was determined according to exposure in workplaces and chemical hazard.In 229 workplaces over the country, 831 tons of DEHP have been used as plasticizers, insecticides, and ink solvent. Calculated 50% lethal dose values ranged from 14.2 to 50 g/kg, as determined via acute toxicity testing in rodents. Chronic carcinogenicity tests revealed cases of lung and liver degeneration, shrinkage of the testes, and liver cancer. The no-observed-adverse-effect level and the lowest-observed-adverse-effect level were (...) Risk assessment of di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate in the workplace A hazard assessment of di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP), a commonly used workplace chemical, was conducted in order to protect the occupational health of workers. A literature review, consisting of both domestic and international references, examined the chemical management system, working environment, level of exposure, and possible associated risks. This information may be utilized in the future to determine appropriate exposure

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2016 Environmental health and toxicology

10. Workplace exposure to diesel and gasoline engine exhausts and the risk of colorectal cancer in Canadian men (PubMed)

Workplace exposure to diesel and gasoline engine exhausts and the risk of colorectal cancer in Canadian men The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) classified diesel exhaust as carcinogenic to humans (Group 1) and gasoline exhaust as a possible carcinogen (Group 2B) based studies of lung cancer, however the evidence for other sites is limited. We addressed this question by investigating exposure to diesel and gasoline emissions with respect to risk of colorectal cancer in men.We

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2016 Environmental Health

11. Contemporary Occupational Carcinogen Exposure and Bladder Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis. (PubMed)

Contemporary Occupational Carcinogen Exposure and Bladder Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis. Bladder cancer (BC) is a common disease. Despite manufacturing and legislative changes to workplace hygiene, many BCs still arise through occupational carcinogen exposure.To profile contemporary risks of occupational BC.A systematic review using PubMed, Medline, Embase, and Web of Science was performed in October 2012 (initial review) and May 2014 (final review) and was updated in June 2015

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2015 JAMA oncology

12. Exposure Monitoring and Risk Assessment of Biphenyl in the Workplace (PubMed)

Exposure Monitoring and Risk Assessment of Biphenyl in the Workplace This study was performed to assess exposure to and the risk caused by biphenyl in the workplace. Biphenyl is widely used as a heat transfer medium and as an emulsifier and polish in industry. Vapor or high levels of dust inhalation and dermal exposure to biphenyl can cause eye inflammation, irritation of respiratory organs, and permanent lesions in the liver and nervous system. In this study, the workplace environment (...) concentrations were assessed as central tendency exposure and reasonable maximum exposure and were shown to be 0.03 and 0.12 mg/m³, respectively. In addition, the carcinogenic risk of biphenyl as determined by risk assessment was 0.14 × 10⁻⁴ (central tendency exposure) and 0.56 × 10⁻⁴ (reasonable maximum exposure), which is below the acceptable risk value of 1.0 × 10⁻⁴. Furthermore, the central tendency exposure and reasonable maximum exposure hazard quotients were 0.01 and 0.06 for oral toxicity, 0.05

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2015 International journal of environmental research and public health

13. Carcinogen

carcinogens U.S. National Toxicology Program [ ] The of the is mandated to produce a biennial Report on Carcinogens . As of June 2011, the latest edition was the 12th report (2011). It classifies carcinogens into two groups: Known to be a human carcinogen Reasonably anticipated being a human carcinogen American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists [ ] The (ACGIH) is a private organization best known for its publication of (TLVs) for occupational exposure and monographs on workplace chemical (...) Carcinogen Carcinogen - Wikipedia Carcinogen From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia A carcinogen is any substance, , or that promotes , the formation of . This may be due to the ability to damage the or to the disruption of cellular processes. Several radioactive substances are considered carcinogens, but their carcinogenic activity is attributed to the radiation, for example and , which they emit. Common examples of non-radioactive carcinogens are inhaled , certain , and smoke. Although

2012 Wikipedia

14. Improving outdoor air quality and health: review of interventions

– some local authorities have successfully used workplace or other levies to fund improvement and use of public transport. Spatial planning can be used to reduce the need for vehicle use by design, and has a wider role in reducing emissions from buildings through energy-efficiency measures and use of renewable energy technologies. Promising local interventions that can help reduce demand for more polluting forms of transport are associated with use of public transport and active travel and include

2019 Public Health England

15. Muscle-invasive and Metastatic Bladder Cancer

cancer. Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys, 2012. 83: 953. 28. Zamora-Ros, R., et al. Flavonoid and lignan intake in relation to bladder cancer risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study. Br J Cancer, 2014. 29. Schistosomes, liver flukes and Helicobacter pylori. IARC Working Group on the Evaluation of Carcinogenic Risks to Humans. Lyon, 7-14 June 1994. IARC Monogr Eval Carcinog Risks Hum, 1994. 61: 1. 30. Gouda, I., et al. Bilharziasis and bladder cancer: a time

2019 European Association of Urology

16. Risk factors for breast cancer: A review of the evidence 2018

178 Summary 180 5 Appendix A Acknowledgements 192 Breast cancer risk factors: A review of the evidence v Appendix B IARC and WCRF/AICR classifications 194 Appendix C IARC and WCRF/AICR categories of evidence and criteria for grading carcinogenicity 196 Appendix D Data tables 200 Glossaries 512 Abbreviations 519 References 529 Breast cancer risk factors: A review of the evidence vi Figures Figure 4.1 Age–specific incidence of breast cancer in Australia, by age group, 2017 16 Figure 4.2 Age (...) Table 5.1 Evidence classifications 180 Table 5.2 Summary of risk estimates for factors where the body of evidence has been classified as either ‘Convincing’ or ‘Probable’ 183 Table C.1 International Agency for Research on Cancer (2015): Categories of evidence of carcinogenicity 196 Table C.2 World Cancer Research Fund/American Institute for Cancer Research (2018): Criteria for grading evidence for cancer prevention 198 Table D.1 Birthweight and risk of breast cancer 200 Table D.2 Height and risk

2018 Cancer Australia

17. Muscle-invasive and Metastatic Bladder Cancer

cancer. Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys, 2012. 83: 953. 28. Zamora-Ros, R., et al. Flavonoid and lignan intake in relation to bladder cancer risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study. Br J Cancer, 2014. 29. Schistosomes, liver flukes and Helicobacter pylori. IARC Working Group on the Evaluation of Carcinogenic Risks to Humans. Lyon, 7-14 June 1994. IARC Monogr Eval Carcinog Risks Hum, 1994. 61: 1. 30. Gouda, I., et al. Bilharziasis and bladder cancer: a time

2018 European Association of Urology

18. Smoke-free spaces on the island of Ireland - Snapshot Report 2016

in the workplace which was first introduced in 2004. Legislation prohibiting smoking in cars where children are present has been developed in the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland. In Northern Ireland, recent trends suggest that rules on smoking in the home have become more stringent over time. However, those living in the most deprived areas still experience greater exposure to SHS. In the Republic of Ireland, survey findings indicate slightly stricter rules around smoking in the home, compared (...) ), 2015). In the Republic of Ireland, 23% of the population aged 15 and over are smokers (Department of Health, 2015). SHS is harmful to everyone and is classified as a Group 1 carcinogen. Reducing the exposure of the population to SHS is a core element of the World Health Organization Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (WHO, 2003). Children are especially vulnerable to harms associated with exposure as they are often unable to remove themselves from a smoking environment (Öberg et al, 2010

2017 Institute of Public Health in Ireland

19. Guidelines for care of patients with actinic keratosis

of the patient and previous treatments tried. Added to this is the large number of therapeutic agents, their modes of application and the ?exibility with which each agent can be used. Given this backdrop, it is to be expected that there is variation in clinical practice. Table 2 attempts to bring a broad perspective to the options. In some instances it might be viewed in combination with Table 3, which is an approxi- mation of a simpli?ed cost–bene?t analysis. 8.1 General Lifestyle, dietary fat, 56 workplace

2017 British Association of Dermatologists

20. HTA of smoking cessation interventions

. There has been a general trend of reducing prevalence since the 1970s. A number of legislative or policy interventions have been made in Ireland to reduce exposure to smoke and smoking. These include the bans on advertising, sales to minors, workplace smoking, and smoking in cars carrying minors. These policies are likely to have impacted on smoking either by reducing uptake, encouraging quit attempts or by reducing the quantity of cigarettes smoked. Population-level interventions support a move

2017 Health Information and Quality Authority

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