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Cancer Survivor Care

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61. Caring for survivors of childhood cancer: it takes a village. (PubMed)

Caring for survivors of childhood cancer: it takes a village. Over 80% of children diagnosed with cancer are now cured. The burgeoning population of survivors of childhood cancer experiences high rates of morbidity and mortality due to 'late-effects' of treatment. These can be defined as any consequence of treatment that persists beyond or develops after the completion of cancer therapy. Awareness of late-effects is critically important for pediatricians and adult providers alike, as late (...) -effects impact children in proximity to cancer treatment, as well as adults many decades removed. This review presents the importance of lifelong follow-up care for survivors, highlights existing screening guidelines, and reviews various models of survivor care.National and international guidelines have been developed to standardize screening for survivors, and multiple models of survivorship care exist. The optimal model likely depends on individual factors, including the survivor's needs

2018 Current Opinion in Pediatrics

62. Perceptions of shared care among survivors of colorectal cancer from non-English-speaking and English-speaking backgrounds: a qualitative study. (PubMed)

Perceptions of shared care among survivors of colorectal cancer from non-English-speaking and English-speaking backgrounds: a qualitative study. Colorectal cancer (CRC) survivors experience difficulty navigating complex care pathways. Sharing care between GPs and specialist services has been proposed to improve health outcomes in cancer survivors following hospital discharge. Culturally and Linguistically Diverse (CALD) groups are known to have poorer outcomes following cancer treatment (...) but little is known about their perceptions of shared care following surgery for CRC. This study aimed to explore how non-English-speaking and English-speaking patients perceive care to be coordinated amongst various health practitioners.This was a qualitative study using data from face to face semi-structured interviews and one focus group in a culturally diverse area of Sydney with non-English-speaking and English-speaking CRC survivors. Participants were recruited in community settings and were

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2018 BMC Family Practice

63. Moving Beyond Static Survivorship Care Plans: A Systems Engineering Approach to Population Health Management for Cancer Survivors. (PubMed)

Moving Beyond Static Survivorship Care Plans: A Systems Engineering Approach to Population Health Management for Cancer Survivors. The American cancer survivor population is ever-growing, with necessary follow-up primarily accomplished in a high-touch fashion-adding to unsustainability and fragmentation of care. Given the complexities of the health care system processes needed to support survivorship, engineering approaches may best address performance deficits and facilitate the provision (...) that care-planning processes are dynamic, clearly assigned, resilient, and integrated with electronic health record systems.© 2018 American Cancer Society.

2018 Cancer

64. Economic evaluation of patient-centered care among long-term cancer survivors. (PubMed)

Economic evaluation of patient-centered care among long-term cancer survivors. To evaluate the economic outcomes associated with patient perceptions of patient-centered medical home (PCMH) characteristics among long-term cancer survivors in the United States.A retrospective analysis of the 2008 to 2012 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey.A nationally representative sample of adult long-term cancer survivors (≥3 years since diagnosis) was categorized into either patient-centered care (PCC) or non (...) and non-PCC groups.A total of 4288 long-term cancer survivors were identified, with a mean (SD) age of 65.2 (13.8) years. The PCC group was associated with a reduction in mean adjusted healthcare expenditures at follow-up (savings of $1596 per cancer survivor; P = .020). These findings are driven by lower odds of hospitalization (odds ratio, 0.81; 95% CI, 0.66-0.99; P = .035) and lower hospitalization-related healthcare expenditures (PCC: $3323; 95% CI, $2727-$3918; non-PCC: $4912; 95% CI, $4039-$5785

2018 American Journal Of Managed Care

65. Equitably improving outcomes for cancer survivors and supporting caregivers: A blueprint for care delivery, research, education, and policy. (PubMed)

Equitably improving outcomes for cancer survivors and supporting caregivers: A blueprint for care delivery, research, education, and policy. Cancer care delivery is being shaped by growing numbers of cancer survivors coupled with provider shortages, rising costs of primary treatment and follow-up care, significant survivorship health disparities, increased reliance on informal caregivers, and the transition to value-based care. These factors create a compelling need to provide coordinated (...) , comprehensive, personalized care for cancer survivors in ways that meet survivors' and caregivers' unique needs while minimizing the impact of provider shortages and controlling costs for health care systems, survivors, and families. The authors reviewed research identifying and addressing the needs of cancer survivors and caregivers and used this synthesis to create a set of critical priorities for care delivery, research, education, and policy to equitably improve survivor outcomes and support caregivers

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2018 CA: a cancer journal for clinicians

66. Randomized Trial of the Impact of Empowering Childhood Cancer Survivors With Survivorship Care Plans. (PubMed)

Randomized Trial of the Impact of Empowering Childhood Cancer Survivors With Survivorship Care Plans. A survivorship care plan (SCP), that is, individualized treatment summary and schedule of off-therapy surveillance, will be mandated by January 2019. It is unclear whether SCPs improve adherence to recommended follow-up care in the community. In this trial, we evaluated the impact of randomly assigning childhood cancer survivors to 1) SCPs to be taken to their primary care physician (PCP (...) ) to implement or 2) survivorship clinic (SC) on health care quality measures.Eligibility included cancer diagnosis younger than age 18 years (2000-2012), cancer free, one or more years off therapy, and no prior survivorship clinic attendance. At 12 months, the random assignment groups were compared (SCP+PCP vs SC) by intent-to-treat analysis with two-sided statistical tests in terms of patient adherence to guideline-recommended surveillance tests (eg, echocardiogram) and number of newly identified late

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2018 Journal of the National Cancer Institute

67. Geospatial patterns of access to self-care resources for obesity among endometrial cancer survivors in a high poverty urban community. (PubMed)

Geospatial patterns of access to self-care resources for obesity among endometrial cancer survivors in a high poverty urban community. To examine endometrial cancer survivors' access to recommended obesity-related self-care resources.Participants included women treated 2010-2015 for endometrial cancer at an academic medical center who lived in the surrounding 16 ZIP code area on Chicago's South Side. Demographic and health data were abstracted from medical records. A socioeconomic status (SES (...) ) score (SES-1 = low, SES-5 = high) was generated for each patient using census block group-level data. Self-care resources for exercise, healthy weight, and diet were obtained from a community resource census. Geospatial techniques assessed "walkable access" (~½-mile radius around a patient's home) to obesity-related resources. Multivariable logistic regression investigated associations between access to obesity-related resources and patient characteristics.Of 195 endometrial cancer survivors, 81

2018 Gynecologic Oncology

68. Morbidity and Mortality Differences Between Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation Survivors and Other Cancer Survivors

to 1.5). Risks of digestive, skin, and musculoskeletal complications also were greater among HCT versus non-HCT cancer survivors. The two groups had similar risks of circulatory complications and second cancers. Both HCT and non-HCT cancer survivors had significantly greater 10-year cumulative incidences of all major organ-system outcomes versus the general population. Conclusion History of HCT was associated with late morbidity and mortality among cancer survivors. In particular, clinicians who care (...) Morbidity and Mortality Differences Between Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation Survivors and Other Cancer Survivors Purpose To compare the risks of serious health outcomes among hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) survivors versus a matched population of patients with cancer who did not undergo HCT, where the primary difference may be exposure to HCT. Methods Two-year HCT survivors treated at a comprehensive cancer center from 1992 through 2009 who were Washington State residents (n

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2017 EvidenceUpdates

69. Physical activity in the community improves mobility for cancer survivors

cancer teams, not just in palliative care. NHS England’s 2016 Commissioning Guidance recommends rehabilitation for a number of conditions, including cancer. What are the implications? Older cancer survivors can find their physical functioning reduced after cancer and treatment, adding to any physical issues they may already have associated with ageing. Home- and community-based physical rehabilitation appears to help to improve these cancer survivors’ physical functioning. The participants were (...) . London: National Institute for Health and Care Excellence; 2014. NICE. CG80. London: National Institute for Health and Care Excellence; 2017. NICE. CG175. London: National Institute for Health and Care Excellence; 2014. Why was this study needed? As cancer treatments improve, more people are surviving cancer. Recent projections indicate that by 2040, nearly three out of four cancer survivors will be 65 years and older. However, cancer and its treatments affect the body and can impact on people’s

2019 NIHR Dissemination Centre

70. Cancer Survivors ? Who are they, what are their needs, and how can medical providers meet these needs?

burdens of additional cancer-related medical care. You wonder what role you can play in her care and how to address her concerns. ( Adapted from Nekhlyudov L. Cancer Survivorship E-Learning Series for Primary Care Providers. George Washington University Cancer Institute module: Cancer Survivors in Primary Care ) The case above underscores several issues pertinent to cancer survivors and what is uniquely called cancer survivorship care – First, what defines a cancer survivor? What are the needs (...) of cancer survivors? Why is cancer survivorship care important in the current healthcare landscape? As this patient population continues to grow, the need to increase education and training in cancer survivorship care becomes more pertinent at all stages of medical training. This article aims to spark awareness for cancer survivorship by presenting evidence behind the needs of cancer survivors and the unique challenges in organizing a survivorship clinic. A. Who are cancer survivors? The term “cancer

2017 Clinical Correlations

71. Supervised exercise sessions increase physical activity and fitness of cancer survivors

Supervised exercise sessions increase physical activity and fitness of cancer survivors Supervised exercise sessions increase physical activity and fitness of cancer survivors Discover Portal Discover Portal Supervised exercise sessions increase physical activity and fitness of cancer survivors Published on 11 December 2018 doi: Aerobic exercise and resistance sessions that include supervision help people living with cancer to meet guideline physical activity levels. Common behaviour change (...) recurrence. It has been estimated that less than 30% of people living with cancer meet the recommended physical activity levels. Because most cancer survivors are not regularly physically active, there is a need to understand how best to promote and sustain physical activity for these people. This update to a 2013 Cochrane review aimed to assess which interventions are best at promoting regular exercise in adults living with and beyond cancer. What did this study do? The systematic review included 23

2019 NIHR Dissemination Centre

72. Access to Cancer Care and General Medical Care Services Among Cancer Survivors in the United States: An Analysis of 2011 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey Data (PubMed)

Access to Cancer Care and General Medical Care Services Among Cancer Survivors in the United States: An Analysis of 2011 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey Data Cancer survivors require appropriate health care to manage their unique health needs. This study describes access to cancer care among cancer survivors in the United States and compares access to general medical care between cancer survivors and people who have no history of cancer.We assessed access to general medical care using the core (...) 2011 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS). We assessed access to cancer care using the MEPS Experiences With Cancer Survey. We used multivariable logistic regression to compare access to general medical care among 2 groups of cancer survivors (those who reported having access to all necessary cancer care [n = 1088] and those who did not [n = 70]) with self-reported access to general medical care among people who had no history of cancer (n = 22 434).Of the 1158 cancer survivors, 70 (6.0

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2016 Public Health Reports

73. Overweight in childhood cancer survivors: the Swiss Childhood Cancer Survivor Study. (PubMed)

Overweight in childhood cancer survivors: the Swiss Childhood Cancer Survivor Study. An increased risk of becoming overweight has been reported for childhood cancer survivors (CCSs), in particular leukemia survivors, although the evidence is inconclusive.We assessed the prevalence of overweight in CCSs, with a focus on leukemia survivors, compared it with their peers, and determined potential risk factors.As part of the Swiss Childhood Cancer Survivor Study, we sent a questionnaire between 2007 (...) included 2365 CCSs, 819 siblings, and 9591 SHS participants. At survey, at an average of 15 y after diagnosis, the prevalence of overweight in CCSs overall (26%) and in leukemia survivors (26%) was similar to that in siblings (22%) and the general population (25%). Risk factors for being overweight in CCSs were male sex (OR: 1.8; 95% CI: 1.5, 2.1), both young (OR for ages 5-14 y: 1.6; 95% CI: 1.2, 2.3) and older (range-OR for ages 25-29 y: 1.7; 95% CI: 1.2, 2.4; OR for ages 40-45 y: 4.0; 95% CI: 2.5

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2018 American Journal of Clinical Nutrition

74. Perceptions of risk of infertility among male survivors of childhood cancer: A report from the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study. (PubMed)

of increased risk of infertility among men with no history of gonadotoxic treatment were predicted by never having fathered a child (OR, 1.88; 95% CI, 1.17-3.03), recent participation in survivor-focused health care (OR, 2.11; 95% CI, 1.01-4.42), and higher educational achievement.Many male survivors of childhood cancer are unaware of how their cancer treatments could impact their reproductive health, underscoring the need for all patients to receive education regarding their risk of infertility throughout (...) Perceptions of risk of infertility among male survivors of childhood cancer: A report from the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study. The objective of the current study was to characterize and identify factors associated with perceptions of risk of infertility among adult male survivors of childhood cancer.A total of 1233 adult male survivors from the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study who were without a history of disease recurrence or subsequent malignancy reported their perceptions of their risk

2018 Cancer

75. Rehabilitation Outcomes of Shoulder Function in Oral Cancer Survivors Cancer Survivors

before adding more. Rehabilitation Outcomes of Shoulder Function in Oral Cancer Survivors Cancer Survivors The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. of clinical studies and talk to your health care provider before participating. Read our for details. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03545100 Recruitment Status : Recruiting First Posted : June 4 (...) Rehabilitation Outcomes of Shoulder Function in Oral Cancer Survivors Cancer Survivors Rehabilitation Outcomes of Shoulder Function in Oral Cancer Survivors Cancer Survivors - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies

2018 Clinical Trials

76. Temporal patterns in the risk of chronic health conditions in survivors of childhood cancer diagnosed 1970-99: a report from the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study cohort. (PubMed)

. However, achieving long-term survival for childhood cancer continues to come at a cost for many survivors, emphasising the importance of long-term follow-up care for this population.National Cancer Institute and the American Lebanese-Syrian Associated Charities.Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. (...) Temporal patterns in the risk of chronic health conditions in survivors of childhood cancer diagnosed 1970-99: a report from the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study cohort. Treatments for childhood cancer have evolved over the past 50 years, with the goal of maximising the proportion of patients who achieve long-term survival, while minimising the adverse effects of therapy. We aimed to assess incidence patterns of serious chronic health conditions in long-term survivors of childhood cancer across

2018 Lancet Oncology

77. Palliative Care for the Patient with Incurable Cancer or Advanced Disease: Part 1: Approach to Care

, considering all comorbidities. • Clarify the patient’s preferred place of care. • Establish the caregiver’s ability to provide care at home, if that is the patient’s preference. • Review the goals of care regularly, and when there is a change in clinical status. 5. Management strategies: non-pharmacologic Lifestyle management • Exercise: Regular exercise and activity has been proven to improve quality of life and function in cancer survivors. 7 • Nutrition: Nutritional needs are different for patients (...) Palliative Care for the Patient with Incurable Cancer or Advanced Disease: Part 1: Approach to Care Guidelines & Protocols Advisory Committee Palliative Care for the Patient with Incurable Cancer or Advanced Disease Part 1: Approach to Care Effective Date: February 22, 2017 Scope This guideline presents palliative care assessment and management strategies for primary care practitioners caring for adult patients aged = 19 years with incurable cancer and end stage chronic disease of many types

2017 Clinical Practice Guidelines and Protocols in British Columbia

78. Survivorship care plans and adherence to lifestyle recommendations among breast cancer survivors. (PubMed)

Survivorship care plans and adherence to lifestyle recommendations among breast cancer survivors. The effectiveness of survivorship care plans has not been widely tested. We evaluated whether a one-time brief lifestyle consultation as part of a broader survivorship care plan was effective at changing diet and lifestyle patterns.A diverse sample of women with stage 0-III breast cancer were randomized to control or intervention groups within 6 weeks of completing adjuvant treatment. Both groups (...) ) and frequency of physical activity (P = 0.006).The intervention changed lifestyle behaviors and knowledge in the short-term, but the benefits did not persist.Culturally competent long-term behavioral interventions should be tested beyond the survivorship care plan to facilitate long-term behavior change among breast cancer survivors.

2017 Journal of cancer survivorship : research and practice

79. Stepped-Care Telehealth for Distress in Rural Cancer Survivors

Stepped-Care Telehealth for Distress in Rural Cancer Survivors Stepped-Care Telehealth for Distress in Rural Cancer Survivors - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. Stepped-Care Telehealth (...) for Distress in Rural Cancer Survivors (Telehealth) The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. of clinical studies and talk to your health care provider before participating. Read our for details. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03060096 Recruitment Status : Recruiting First Posted : February 23, 2017 Last Update Posted : August 2, 2018 See Sponsor: Wake

2017 Clinical Trials

80. Cancer survivors' preference for follow-up care providers: a cross-sectional study from the population-based PROFILES-registry. (PubMed)

Cancer survivors' preference for follow-up care providers: a cross-sectional study from the population-based PROFILES-registry. The best practice for the organization of follow-up care in oncology is under debate, due to growing numbers of cancer survivors. Understanding survivors' preferences for follow-up care is elementary for designing patient-centred care. Based on data from prostate cancer and melanoma survivors, this study aims to identify: 1) preferences for follow-up care providers (...) specialist. Lower educated survivors were less likely to have a preference for both the medical specialist and the general practitioner. Overall, survivors prefer to discuss diet, physical fitness and fatigue with the general practitioner, and hereditary and recurrence with the medical specialist. Only a small minority favored to discuss cancer-related problems with the oncology nurse.Survivors reported different preferences for follow-up care providers based on age, education level, gender

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2017 Acta Oncologica

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