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CALMER Approach to Difficult Clinical Encounters

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1. CALMER Approach to Difficult Clinical Encounters

CALMER Approach to Difficult Clinical Encounters CALMER Approach to Difficult Clinical Encounters Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer (...) Administration 4 CALMER Approach to Difficult Clinical Encounters CALMER Approach to Difficult Clinical Encounters Aka: CALMER Approach to Difficult Clinical Encounters II. Technique (Mnemonic: CALMER) Catalyst for Change See Change Model Identify patient's current stage in the change model and strategize with patient on advancing to the next stage Alter thoughts (changes feelings) Discuss patient's specific negative feelings and their impact on the encounter Providers should also identify their own negative

2018 FP Notebook

2. CALMER Approach to Difficult Clinical Encounters

CALMER Approach to Difficult Clinical Encounters CALMER Approach to Difficult Clinical Encounters Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer (...) Administration 4 CALMER Approach to Difficult Clinical Encounters CALMER Approach to Difficult Clinical Encounters Aka: CALMER Approach to Difficult Clinical Encounters II. Technique (Mnemonic: CALMER) Catalyst for Change See Change Model Identify patient's current stage in the change model and strategize with patient on advancing to the next stage Alter thoughts (changes feelings) Discuss patient's specific negative feelings and their impact on the encounter Providers should also identify their own negative

2015 FP Notebook

3. Promoting Safety: Alternative Approaches to the Use of Restraints

Promoting Safety: Alternative Approaches to the Use of Restraints BEST PRACTICE GUIDELINES • www.rnao.org 1 FEBRUARY 2012 Promoting Safety: Alternative Approaches to the Use of Restraints Clinical Best Practice Guidelines REGISTERED NURSES’ ASSOCIATION OF ONTARIO Promoting Safety: Alternative Approaches to the Use of Restraints Disclaimer These guidelines are not binding on nurses or the organizations that employ them. The use of these guidelines should be flexible, and based on individual (...) : Alternative Approaches to the Use of Restraints BEST PRACTICE GUIDELINES • www.rnao.org 3 Appendix D: Description of the Toolkit 93 Appendix E: Example: Experience of Being Restrained (SEBR) Interview Tool 94-96 Appendix F: Example: Short-Term Assessment of Risk and Treatability Tool (START) 97-98 Appendix G: Example: Broset Violence Checklist Tool 99-100 Appendix H: Example: Historical-Clinical-Risk Management: 20 (HCR-20) 101 Appendix I: Example: Coping Agreement Questionnaire (CAQ) 102-103 Appendix J

2012 Registered Nurses' Association of Ontario

4. Specialist dementia care units

(4.6), developed inductively by coding the content of the papers. 3.4 Assessment of quality of evidence The National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) has developed a framework for developers of clinical guidelines that provides a structured approach for considering not only the body of evidence that is relevant to a particular clinical question but also the setting in which that evidence is to be applied. The framework has five components: • The evidence base — the quantity and quality (...) practice than to provide a specialised care environment” 30, p 2 NSW Health (2011) 28 Mental Health Aged Care Partnership Initiative Independence with activities of daily living Due to small numbers of admitted residents assessed at discharge (24 of 77 admissions) it was “difficult to draw any conclusions about clinical outcomes”. 28, p 15 Clinical outcomes on discharge were not reported. No reasons for the low number of assessments on discharge were reported Level of agitation Mental health outcomes

2018 Sax Institute Evidence Check

5. Assessment, diagnosis and interventions for autism spectrum disorders

that females with ASD may present with a different symptom profile and level of impairment than males with ASD. R A diagnostic assessment, alongside a profile of the individual’ s strengths and weaknesses, carried out by a multidisciplinary team which has the skills and experience to undertake the assessments, should be considered as the optimum approach for individuals suspected of having ASD. Specialist assessment should involve a history-taking element, a clinical observation/assessment element (...) surveillance for older children and adults. Child health surveillance takes a broad clinical approach involving partnership between parents, children and health professionals. Child health surveillance can contribute to the early recognition and diagnosis of ASD. 30 Surveillance for ASD should follow general developmental surveillance and should be considered by all professionals working with children and young people. 2 +| 9 Assessment, diagnosis and interventions for autism spectrum disorders Responding

2016 SIGN

6. Refusal of Medically Recommended Treatment During Pregnancy

or even experience moral distress ( ). In these circumstances, as in all clinical encounters, the obstetrician–gynecologist’s actions should be guided by the ethical principle that adult patients who are capable decision makers have the right to refuse recommended medical treatment. This doctrine has evolved through legal cases, regulations, and statutes that have established the requirement of informed consent to medical treatment in order to effect patient self-determination and preclude violations (...) women toward a specific clinical decision. Although the physician aims to provide recommendations that are based on the best available medical evidence ( ), data and technology are imperfect, and responses to treatment are not always predictable for a given patient. As such, it is difficult to determine the outcome of treatment––or lack of treatment––with absolute certainty. It requires a measure of humility for the obstetrician–gynecologist to acknowledge this to the patient and to herself

2016 American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists

7. Evaluating Sistema Scotland - initial findings report

Evaluating Sistema Scotland - initial findings report Evaluating Sistema Scotland – Initial Findings Report June 2015 Contents Chapter 1: Introduction 5 Sistema Scotland and the Big Noise programme 5 Putting Sistema Scotland into context 5 Evaluating Sistema Scotland: purpose and approach 6 Structure of the report 7 Chapter 2: Profile of Big Noise Raploch 8 Raploch overview 8 Big Noise Raploch 9 Chapter 3: Profile of Big Noise Govanhill 13 Govanhill overview 13 Big Noise Govanhill 15 Chapter 4 (...) Potential 32 ) and the Scottish Government’s Economic Strategy 40 . This evaluation will also consider the implications of its findings in the context of the ‘Christie Commission’ 41 and key policy drivers and challenges such as social regeneration, community engagement, asset-based approaches, preventative spend and early intervention. Evaluating Sistema Scotland: purpose and approach The vision for the evaluation is to capture important learning from the implementation and impact of Sistema Scotland’s

2015 Glasgow Centre for Population Health

8. Principles on Intervention for People Unable to Comply with Routine Dental Care

to facilitate dental care, must all be viewed as forms of clinical restraint. It is important to realise that there are times when reasonable physical intervention is preferable to more extreme alternatives and might be acceptable for single, short interventions. However, such an approach should only be countenanced when all other approaches have been considered. There will be occasions on which resort to general anaesthesia (GA) is appropriate but it must be recognised that rendering a patient unconscious (...) on the patient. Oral hygiene techniques must be based on individual assessment and agreed with the multiprofessional team. There should be a risk assessment for the agreed approach. 19 The following recommendations are based on comprehensive guidelines developed to enable clinical care. Where a physical intervention is involved, in order to effectively accomplish the task, it must be: • The minimum to be effective • Clearly documented to include type and reason for use • Beneficial for the individual

2004 British Society for Disability and Oral Health

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