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Bubo

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1. Aspergillus Section Nigri-Associated Calcium Oxalate Crystals in an Eurasian Eagle Owl (Bubo bubo) Full Text available with Trip Pro

Aspergillus Section Nigri-Associated Calcium Oxalate Crystals in an Eurasian Eagle Owl (Bubo bubo) An adult male Eurasian eagle owl (Bubo bubo) housed at a wildlife rehabilitation facility in southern Oregon died after a short period of progressive ill-thrift. Radiographs taken prior to death demonstrated abnormal radiopaque material in the coelom and the owl was submitted for postmortem examination. Black pigmented fungus was noted grossly, particularly in the respiratory tissues

2018 Case Reports in Veterinary Medicine

2. Factors influencing territorial occupancy and reproductive success in a Eurasian Eagle-owl (Bubo bubo) population. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Factors influencing territorial occupancy and reproductive success in a Eurasian Eagle-owl (Bubo bubo) population. Modelling territorial occupancy and reproductive success is a key issue for better understanding the population dynamics of territorial species. This study aimed to investigate these ecological processes in a Eurasian Eagle-owl (Bubo bubo) population in south-eastern Spain during a seven-year period. A multi-season, multi-state modelling approach was followed to estimate

2017 PLoS ONE

3. Necroptosis of infiltrated macrophages drives Yersinia pestis dispersal within buboes Full Text available with Trip Pro

Necroptosis of infiltrated macrophages drives Yersinia pestis dispersal within buboes When draining lymph nodes become infected by Yersinia pestis (Y. pestis), a massive influx of phagocytic cells occurs, resulting in distended and necrotic structures known as buboes. The bubonic stage of the Y. pestis life cycle precedes septicemia, which is facilitated by trafficking of infected mononuclear phagocytes through these buboes. However, how Y. pestis convert these immunocytes recruited by host (...) targets. Dying macrophages also produced chemotactic sphingosine 1-phosphate, enhancing cell-to-cell contact, further promoting infection. This necroptosis-driven expansion of infected macrophages in buboes maximized the number of bacteria-bearing macrophages reaching secondary lymph nodes, leading to sepsis. In support, necrostatins confined bacteria within macrophages and protected mice from lethal infection. These findings define necrotization of buboes as a mechanism for bacterial spread

2018 JCI insight

4. The first clinical cases of Haemoproteus infection in a snowy owl (Bubo scandiacus) and a goshawk (Accipiter gentilis) at a zoo in the Republic of Korea Full Text available with Trip Pro

The first clinical cases of Haemoproteus infection in a snowy owl (Bubo scandiacus) and a goshawk (Accipiter gentilis) at a zoo in the Republic of Korea This study reports two clinical cases of avian haemosporidian infection caused by a Haemoproteus sp., involving a snowy owl (Bubo scandiacus) and a goshawk (Accipiter gentilis), at a zoo. The snowy owl died after presenting with anorexia, depression and lethargy. A blood smear with Wright's staining confirmed Haemoproteus infection. Necropsy

2018 The Journal of Veterinary Medical Science

5. Columbid herpesvirus-1 mortality in great horned owls (Bubo virginianus) from Calgary, Alberta Full Text available with Trip Pro

Columbid herpesvirus-1 mortality in great horned owls (Bubo virginianus) from Calgary, Alberta Four cases of Columbid herpesvirus-1 infection in great horned owls (Bubo virginianus) were identified in Calgary, Alberta. Necropsy findings included severe multifocal hepatic and splenic necrosis, pharyngeal ulceration and necrosis, and gastrointestinal necrosis. Occasional eosinophilic intranuclear viral inclusion bodies were associated with the foci of necrosis and polymerase chain reaction (PCR

2012 The Canadian Veterinary Journal

6. Anti-Chancroidal Drugs Tested by the Hetero-Inoculation of Bubo Fluid from the Treated Donor Full Text available with Trip Pro

Anti-Chancroidal Drugs Tested by the Hetero-Inoculation of Bubo Fluid from the Treated Donor 14777888 2004 02 15 2018 12 01 0007-134X 26 3 1950 Sep The British journal of venereal diseases Br J Vener Dis Anti-chancroidal drugs tested by the hetero-inoculation of bubo fluid from the treated donor. 131-5 WILLCOX R R RR eng Journal Article England Br J Vener Dis 0421042 0007-134X OM Body Fluids Chancroid Humans Vaccination 5120:7816:192 CHANCROID 1950 9 1 1950 9 1 0 1 1950 9 1 0 0 ppublish

1950 British Journal of Venereal Diseases

7. Bubo: The Different Kinds and the Differential Diagnosis of the Same Full Text available with Trip Pro

Bubo: The Different Kinds and the Differential Diagnosis of the Same 20891548 2011 03 29 2015 12 25 0027-9684 8 3 1916 Jul Journal of the National Medical Association J Natl Med Assoc Bubo: The Different Kinds and the Differential Diagnosis of the Same. 144-6 Tennant eng Journal Article United States J Natl Med Assoc 7503090 0027-9684 2010 10 5 6 0 1916 7 1 0 0 1916 7 1 0 1 ppublish 20891548 PMC2622274

1916 Journal of the National Medical Association

8. A NOTE ON CLIMATIC BUBO Full Text available with Trip Pro

A NOTE ON CLIMATIC BUBO 21772561 2011 11 10 2011 07 20 0007-134X 3 3 1927 Jul The British journal of venereal diseases Br J Vener Dis A NOTE ON CLIMATIC BUBO. 244-6 Hanschell H M HM Hon. Med. Supt. Seamen's Hospital, Royal Albert Dock, London. eng Journal Article England Br J Vener Dis 0421042 0007-134X 2011 7 21 6 0 1927 7 1 0 0 1927 7 1 0 1 ppublish 21772561 PMC1046902

1927 British Journal of Venereal Diseases

9. THE “NON-VENEREAL” OR CLIMATIC BUBO: A CLINICAL STUDY OF A SERIES OF CASES OCCURRING IN A NAVAL HOSPITAL AND ON BOARD SHIP, WITH A DISCUSSION OF VIEWS OF RECENT AUTHORITIES Full Text available with Trip Pro

THE “NON-VENEREAL” OR CLIMATIC BUBO: A CLINICAL STUDY OF A SERIES OF CASES OCCURRING IN A NAVAL HOSPITAL AND ON BOARD SHIP, WITH A DISCUSSION OF VIEWS OF RECENT AUTHORITIES 21773493 2011 11 10 2011 07 20 0007-134X 8 1 1932 Jan The British journal of venereal diseases Br J Vener Dis THE "NON-VENEREAL" OR CLIMATIC BUBO: A CLINICAL STUDY OF A SERIES OF CASES OCCURRING IN A NAVAL HOSPITAL AND ON BOARD SHIP, WITH A DISCUSSION OF VIEWS OF RECENT AUTHORITIES. 1-47 Gibson P L PL eng Journal Article

1932 British Journal of Venereal Diseases

10. CLIMATIC BUBO AND LYMPHOGRANULOMA INGUINALE Full Text available with Trip Pro

CLIMATIC BUBO AND LYMPHOGRANULOMA INGUINALE 20319691 2010 06 24 2010 06 24 0008-4409 31 5 1934 Nov Canadian Medical Association journal Can Med Assoc J CLIMATIC BUBO AND LYMPHOGRANULOMA INGUINALE. 496-500 Kinneard G G Bahamas General Hospital, Nassau, Bahamas, W.I. eng Journal Article Canada Can Med Assoc J 0414110 0008-4409 2010 3 24 6 0 1934 11 1 0 0 1934 11 1 0 1 ppublish 20319691 PMC403602

1934 Canadian Medical Association Journal

11. The History of the Recognition of a New Venereal Disease, Comprising Climatic Bubo, Lymphogranuloma Inguinale, Esthiomène, Chronic Elephantiasis and Ulceration of the Vulva, the Genito-ano-rectal Syndrome, Inflammatory Stricture of the Rectum: President' Full Text available with Trip Pro

The History of the Recognition of a New Venereal Disease, Comprising Climatic Bubo, Lymphogranuloma Inguinale, Esthiomène, Chronic Elephantiasis and Ulceration of the Vulva, the Genito-ano-rectal Syndrome, Inflammatory Stricture of the Rectum: President' 19989013 2010 06 22 2010 06 22 0035-9157 26 1 1932 Nov Proceedings of the Royal Society of Medicine Proc. R. Soc. Med. The History of the Recognition of a New Venereal Disease, Comprising Climatic Bubo, Lymphogranuloma Inguinale, Esthiomène

1932 Proceedings of the Royal Society of Medicine

12. THE “NON-VENEREAL” OR CLIMATIC BUBO: A CLINICAL STUDY OF A SERIES OF CASES OCCURRING IN A NAVAL HOSPITAL AND ON BOARD SHIP, WITH A DISCUSSION OF VIEWS OF RECENT AUTHORITIES Full Text available with Trip Pro

THE “NON-VENEREAL” OR CLIMATIC BUBO: A CLINICAL STUDY OF A SERIES OF CASES OCCURRING IN A NAVAL HOSPITAL AND ON BOARD SHIP, WITH A DISCUSSION OF VIEWS OF RECENT AUTHORITIES 21773488 2011 11 10 2011 07 20 0007-134X 7 4 1931 Oct The British journal of venereal diseases Br J Vener Dis THE "NON-VENEREAL" OR CLIMATIC BUBO: A CLINICAL STUDY OF A SERIES OF CASES OCCURRING IN A NAVAL HOSPITAL AND ON BOARD SHIP, WITH A DISCUSSION OF VIEWS OF RECENT AUTHORITIES. 243-75 Gibson P L PL eng Journal

1931 British Journal of Venereal Diseases

13. Lymphogranuloma Inguinale (Tropical Bubo) Full Text available with Trip Pro

Lymphogranuloma Inguinale (Tropical Bubo) 20784853 2011 04 04 2011 04 04 0007-1447 1 4299 1943 May 29 British medical journal Br Med J Lymphogranuloma Inguinale (Tropical Bubo). 660-1 Stammers F A FA eng Journal Article England Br Med J 0372673 0007-1447 2010 8 27 6 0 1943 5 29 0 0 1943 5 29 0 1 ppublish 20784853 PMC2283018

1943 British medical journal

14. Chancroidal Bubo Cured by Sulfanilamide Full Text available with Trip Pro

Chancroidal Bubo Cured by Sulfanilamide 18745145 2008 08 29 2008 11 20 0093-4038 50 5 1939 May California and western medicine Cal West Med Chancroidal Bubo Cured by Sulfanilamide. 361 Doughty J F JF eng Journal Article United States Cal West Med 0414326 0093-4038 1939 5 1 0 0 1939 5 1 0 1 1939 5 1 0 0 ppublish 18745145 PMC1660452

1939 California and western medicine

15. On Non-Venereal Bubo Full Text available with Trip Pro

On Non-Venereal Bubo 20756476 2011 03 29 2011 03 29 0007-1447 2 1865 1896 Sep 26 British medical journal Br Med J On Non-Venereal Bubo. 842-4 Godding C C CC eng Journal Article England Br Med J 0372673 0007-1447 2010 8 27 6 0 1896 9 26 0 0 1896 9 26 0 1 ppublish 20756476 PMC2510773

1896 British medical journal

16. Non-Venereal Bubo Full Text available with Trip Pro

Non-Venereal Bubo 20757062 2011 03 29 2011 03 29 0007-1447 1 1902 1897 Jun 12 British medical journal Br Med J Non-Venereal Bubo. 1475-6 Godding C C CC eng Journal Article England Br Med J 0372673 0007-1447 2010 8 27 6 0 1897 6 12 0 0 1897 6 12 0 1 ppublish 20757062 PMC2433820

1897 British medical journal

17. XIV. The significance of the locality of the primary bubo in animals infected with plague in nature Full Text available with Trip Pro

XIV. The significance of the locality of the primary bubo in animals infected with plague in nature 20474317 2010 06 23 2010 06 23 0022-1724 7 3 1907 Jul The Journal of hygiene J Hyg (Lond) XIV. The significance of the locality of the primary bubo in animals infected with plague in nature. 382-94 eng Journal Article England J Hyg (Lond) 0375374 0022-1724 2010 5 18 6 0 1907 7 1 0 0 1907 7 1 0 1 ppublish 20474317 PMC2236246

1907 The Journal of hygiene

18. Yersinia infection

with intravenous antibiotics is appropriate in patients with invasive infection. Definition In humans, Yersinia pestis causes plague and Yersinia enterocolitica causes yersiniosis. Infection with Yersinia pseudotuberculosis is uncommon and causes similar symptoms to yersiniosis. The plague bacillus Y pestis is transmitted to people mainly by the bites of infected fleas. Infection is characterised by the sudden onset of systemic symptoms such as fever and painful swelling of lymph nodes (buboes) in the bubonic (...) plague [Figure caption and citation for the preceding image starts]: Axillary bubo From the image collection of the CDC; used with permission [Citation ends]. ; systemic features, but without buboes, in the septicaemic plague; and chest pain, dyspnoea, and haemoptysis in the pneumonic plague. Y enterocolitica and Y pseudotuberculosis are mainly acquired by consuming contaminated food and water. Symptoms are mostly confined to the gastrointestinal (GI) tract (self-limiting gastroenteritis

2018 BMJ Best Practice

19. Chancroid

associated with fluctuant lymphadenitis (bubo formation). An important co-factor in HIV transmission. HIV status must be assessed. Most cases resolve with antibiotic therapy; recurrence is rare. Sexual partners within 10 days prior to onset of symptoms must be traced and treated, even if asymptomatic. Several reports now describe non-genital cutaneous limb ulcerations due to H ducreyi in yaws-endemic countries. Definition Chancroid is an infectious disease caused by the fastidious, gram-negative (...) coccobacillus Haemophilus ducreyi , most commonly presenting with a painful genital ulcer, and often associated with fluctuant lymphadenitis. History and exam presence of risk factors genital papules genital ulcers lymphadenitis and buboes urethritis and dysuria vaginal discharge dyspareunia rectal pain or bleeding rectovaginal fistula extra-genital ulcers multiple sex partners sexual contact with sex worker unprotected intercourse substance abuse male sex lack of circumcision (in men) poor personal hygiene

2018 BMJ Best Practice

20. Lymphogranuloma venereum

; presents as painful, unilateral, inguinal or femoral lymphadenopathy (often referred to as 'inguinal syndrome'). Proctocolitis has emerged as a more typical presentation in men who have sex with men (particularly those who are HIV-positive). Chronic inflammation can lead to scarring and fibrosis causing lymphoedema of the genitals, or formation of strictures and fistulae if anorectal involvement. Identification of Chlamydia trachomatis from the swab of a genital ulcer or aspiration of a bubo (...) is definitive diagnosis. Doxycycline is the preferred first-line treatment; macrolides are an alternative treatment option (e.g., in pregnant or lactating women, or patients with allergies to tetracyclines). Large buboes may be aspirated, but incision and drainage or surgical excision of buboes may complicate healing. Definition Lymphogranuloma venereum (LGV) is a STD caused by Chlamydia trachomatis serovars L1, L2, or L3, which are endemic to the tropics, but rare in developed regions. Infection occurs

2018 BMJ Best Practice

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