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Brachioradial Pruritus

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1. Brachioradial pruritus treated with computed tomography-guided cervical nerve root block: A case series (PubMed)

Brachioradial pruritus treated with computed tomography-guided cervical nerve root block: A case series 30094306 2019 02 26 2352-5126 4 7 2018 Aug JAAD case reports JAAD Case Rep Brachioradial pruritus treated with computed tomography-guided cervical nerve root block: A case series. 640-644 10.1016/j.jdcr.2018.03.025 Weinberg Brent D BD Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia. Amans Matthew M Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, University

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2018 JAAD Case Reports

2. Application of an 8% capsaicin patch normalizes epidermal TRPV1 expression but not the decreased intraepidermal nerve fibre density in patients with brachioradial pruritus. (PubMed)

Application of an 8% capsaicin patch normalizes epidermal TRPV1 expression but not the decreased intraepidermal nerve fibre density in patients with brachioradial pruritus. Topical capsaicin shows efficacy in the treatment of brachioradial pruritus (BRP); however, its mechanisms of action remain unclear.The effect of capsaicin on the epidermis (i.e. peripheral expression of non-neuronal sensory receptors on keratinocytes, morphological changes in innervation) is still unknown. We aimed

2018 Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology

3. Cost-effectiveness of an 8% Capsaicin Patch in the Treatment of Brachioradial Pruritus and Notalgia Paraesthetica, Two Forms of Neuropathic Pruritus. (PubMed)

Cost-effectiveness of an 8% Capsaicin Patch in the Treatment of Brachioradial Pruritus and Notalgia Paraesthetica, Two Forms of Neuropathic Pruritus. In brachioradial pruritus and notalgia paraesthetica, the 8% capsaicin patch is a novel and effective, but cost-intense, therapy. Routine data for 44 patients were collected 6 months retrospectively and prospectively to first patch application. The cost to health insurance and the patient, and patient-reported outcomes were analysed (visual (...) analogue scale, numerical rating scale, verbal rating scale for pruritus symptoms, Dermatological Life Quality Index, and Patient Benefit Index). Mean inpatient treatment costs were reduced by €212.31, and mean outpatient treatment and medication costs by €100.74 per patient (p.p.). However, these reductions did not offset the high cost of the patch itself (€767.02 p.p.); thus the total cost to health insurance increased by €453.97 p.p. (p ≤ 0.01). The additional costs of therapy to the patient

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2016 Acta Dermato-Venereologica

4. Brachioradial Pruritus and Notalgia Paraesthetica: A Comparative Observational Study of Clinical Presentation and Morphological Pathologies. (PubMed)

Brachioradial Pruritus and Notalgia Paraesthetica: A Comparative Observational Study of Clinical Presentation and Morphological Pathologies. Brachioradial pruritus (BRP) and notalgia paraesthetica (NP) represent 2 of the most common neuropathic itch syndromes. A total of 58 consecutive patients presenting at the Center for Chronic Pruritus, University Hospital Münster, were analysed with regard to clinical presentation, anatomical and morphological pathologies, impairment in quality of life

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2017 Acta Dermato-Venereologica

5. Brachioradial Pruritus

Brachioradial Pruritus Brachioradial Pruritus Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Brachioradial Pruritus Brachioradial (...) Pruritus Aka: Brachioradial Pruritus , Brachioradialis Pruritus , Actinic Brachioradial Neuralgia From Related Chapters II. Epidemiology Affects Caucasians living in tropical regions More common in middle-aged women III. Pathophysiology: Postulated Mechanisms with nerve compression Prolonged ultraviolet light exposure (e.g. tropics) IV. Symptoms Onset often in mid-summer and resolution in December of one or both arms Affects lateral upper arms and s Affects dorsal s Other s (tingling or burning) V

2018 FP Notebook

6. Assessment of pruritus

neuropathy Hodgkin's lymphoma Polycythaemia vera HIV infection/AIDS Thyroid dysfunction Paraneoplastic pruritus Brachioradial pruritus Notalgia paraesthetica Brain tumour Stroke Multiple sclerosis Psychogenic pruritus Persistent delusional disorders Filariasis Strongyloides infection Contributors Authors Professor Head of Department of Dermatology Venereology and Allergology Wroclaw Medical University Wroclaw Poland Disclosures JCS is an author of a number of references cited in this topic. Professor (...) Assessment of pruritus Assessment of pruritus - Differential diagnosis of symptoms | BMJ Best Practice You'll need a subscription to access all of BMJ Best Practice Search  Assessment of pruritus Last reviewed: February 2019 Last updated: September 2018 Summary Pruritus is defined as an unpleasant itching sensation that leads to intensive scratching. The terms pruritus and itching are used synonymously. Pruritus is the most common subjective symptom in dermatology and may occur with or without

2018 BMJ Best Practice

7. Assessment of pruritus

neuropathy Hodgkin's lymphoma Polycythaemia vera HIV infection/AIDS Thyroid dysfunction Paraneoplastic pruritus Brachioradial pruritus Notalgia paraesthetica Brain tumour Stroke Multiple sclerosis Psychogenic pruritus Persistent delusional disorders Filariasis Strongyloides infection Contributors Authors Professor Head of Department of Dermatology Venereology and Allergology Wroclaw Medical University Wroclaw Poland Disclosures JCS is an author of a number of references cited in this topic. Professor (...) Assessment of pruritus Assessment of pruritus - Differential diagnosis of symptoms | BMJ Best Practice You'll need a subscription to access all of BMJ Best Practice Search  Assessment of pruritus Last reviewed: February 2019 Last updated: September 2018 Summary Pruritus is defined as an unpleasant itching sensation that leads to intensive scratching. The terms pruritus and itching are used synonymously. Pruritus is the most common subjective symptom in dermatology and may occur with or without

2018 BMJ Best Practice

8. British Association of Dermatologists? guidelines for the investigation and management of generalized pruritus in adults without an underlying dermatosis

. 166 This can arise due to pathology affecting the peripheral nervous sys- tem causing postherpetic neuropathy, brachioradial pruritus or notalgia paraesthetica, or due to lesions affecting pathways of the central nervous system, for example as a result of spinal cord tumours, neuro?bromatosis type 1 or multiple sclero- sis. 166,167 Sensory symptoms including burning, paraesthesia, stinging and tingling can accompany neuropathic pruri- tus. 166,167 Nerve ?bre compression can cause pruritus (...) of clinically obvious notal- gia paraesthetica or brachioradial pruritus, which can often be managed in primary care. 166,168 Detailed investigation of the nervous system is not usually part of the investigation of gener- alized pruritus, unless it is clinically indicated. Recommendations (investigation) ? Following a detailed history, examination and initial investigations, a patient with neuropathic pruritus may need to be referred to the relevant specialist (Strength of recommendation D (GPP); Level

2018 British Association of Dermatologists

9. Capsaicin 8% cutaneous patch - a promising treatment for brachioradial pruritus? (PubMed)

Capsaicin 8% cutaneous patch - a promising treatment for brachioradial pruritus? 25354282 2016 03 07 2019 03 13 1365-2133 172 6 2015 Jun The British journal of dermatology Br. J. Dermatol. Capsaicin 8% cutaneous patch: a promising treatment for brachioradial pruritus? 1669-1671 10.1111/bjd.13501 Zeidler C C Department of Dermatology, Competence Center Chronic Pruritus, University Hospital of Münster, Münster, Germany. Lüling H H Department of Dermatology, Competence Center Chronic Pruritus (...) , University Hospital of Münster, Münster, Germany. Dieckhöfer A A Department of Dermatology, Competence Center Chronic Pruritus, University Hospital of Münster, Münster, Germany. Osada N N Institute for Medical Informatics, University Hospital of Münster, Münster, Germany. Schedel F F Department of Dermatology, Competence Center Chronic Pruritus, University Hospital of Münster, Münster, Germany. Steinke S S Department of Dermatology, Competence Center Chronic Pruritus, University Hospital of Münster

2014 British Journal of Dermatology

10. Brachioradial Pruritus (Diagnosis)

Brachioradial Pruritus (Diagnosis) Brachioradial Pruritus: Background, Pathophysiology, Etiology Edition: No Results No Results Please confirm that you would like to log out of Medscape. If you log out, you will be required to enter your username and password the next time you visit. https://profreg.medscape.com/px/getpracticeprofile.do?method=getProfessionalProfile&urlCache=aHR0cHM6Ly9lbWVkaWNpbmUubWVkc2NhcGUuY29tL2FydGljbGUvMTM1NTMxMi1vdmVydmlldw== processing > Brachioradial Pruritus Updated (...) : Aug 07, 2018 Author: Julianne Mann, MD; Chief Editor: Dirk M Elston, MD Share Email Print Feedback Close Sections Sections Brachioradial Pruritus Overview Background Brachioradial pruritus is a neurogenic itch syndrome of the upper extremities. It is typically localized to the skin on the dorsolateral forearm overlying the proximal head of the brachioradialis muscle, but involvement of the upper arms and shoulders is also common. [ , ] It may be unilateral or bilateral. Scratching reportedly only

2014 eMedicine.com

11. Brachioradial Pruritus (Follow-up)

Brachioradial Pruritus (Follow-up) Brachioradial Pruritus Treatment & Management: Medical Care, Surgical Care, Consultations Edition: No Results No Results Please confirm that you would like to log out of Medscape. If you log out, you will be required to enter your username and password the next time you visit. https://profreg.medscape.com/px/getpracticeprofile.do?method=getProfessionalProfile&urlCache=aHR0cHM6Ly9lbWVkaWNpbmUubWVkc2NhcGUuY29tL2FydGljbGUvMTM1NTMxMi10cmVhdG1lbnQ= processing (...) > Brachioradial Pruritus Treatment & Management Updated: Aug 07, 2018 Author: Julianne Mann, MD; Chief Editor: Dirk M Elston, MD Share Email Print Feedback Close Sections Sections Brachioradial Pruritus Treatment Medical Care The best reported outcomes have been with antidepressant and anticonvulsant medications that affect nerve conduction. Gabapentin and pregabalin are commonly used. [ , , , ] Patients with brachioradial pruritus need time, sympathy, and understanding. They appreciate being told

2014 eMedicine.com

12. Brachioradial Pruritus (Treatment)

Brachioradial Pruritus (Treatment) Brachioradial Pruritus Treatment & Management: Medical Care, Surgical Care, Consultations Edition: No Results No Results Please confirm that you would like to log out of Medscape. If you log out, you will be required to enter your username and password the next time you visit. https://profreg.medscape.com/px/getpracticeprofile.do?method=getProfessionalProfile&urlCache=aHR0cHM6Ly9lbWVkaWNpbmUubWVkc2NhcGUuY29tL2FydGljbGUvMTM1NTMxMi10cmVhdG1lbnQ= processing (...) > Brachioradial Pruritus Treatment & Management Updated: Aug 07, 2018 Author: Julianne Mann, MD; Chief Editor: Dirk M Elston, MD Share Email Print Feedback Close Sections Sections Brachioradial Pruritus Treatment Medical Care The best reported outcomes have been with antidepressant and anticonvulsant medications that affect nerve conduction. Gabapentin and pregabalin are commonly used. [ , , , ] Patients with brachioradial pruritus need time, sympathy, and understanding. They appreciate being told

2014 eMedicine.com

13. Brachioradial Pruritus (Overview)

Brachioradial Pruritus (Overview) Brachioradial Pruritus: Background, Pathophysiology, Etiology Edition: No Results No Results Please confirm that you would like to log out of Medscape. If you log out, you will be required to enter your username and password the next time you visit. https://profreg.medscape.com/px/getpracticeprofile.do?method=getProfessionalProfile&urlCache=aHR0cHM6Ly9lbWVkaWNpbmUubWVkc2NhcGUuY29tL2FydGljbGUvMTM1NTMxMi1vdmVydmlldw== processing > Brachioradial Pruritus Updated (...) : Aug 07, 2018 Author: Julianne Mann, MD; Chief Editor: Dirk M Elston, MD Share Email Print Feedback Close Sections Sections Brachioradial Pruritus Overview Background Brachioradial pruritus is a neurogenic itch syndrome of the upper extremities. It is typically localized to the skin on the dorsolateral forearm overlying the proximal head of the brachioradialis muscle, but involvement of the upper arms and shoulders is also common. [ , ] It may be unilateral or bilateral. Scratching reportedly only

2014 eMedicine.com

14. Peripheral Sensitization and Loss of Descending Inhibition Is a Hallmark of Chronic Pruritus. (PubMed)

Peripheral Sensitization and Loss of Descending Inhibition Is a Hallmark of Chronic Pruritus. Neurophysiological mechanisms leading to chronicity of pruritus are not yet fully understood and it is not known whether these mechanisms diverge between different underlying diseases of chronic pruritus (CP). This study aimed to detect such mechanisms in CP of various origins. A total of 120 patients with CP of inflammatory origin (atopic dermatitis), neuropathic origin (brachioradial pruritus (...) condition pain modulation effect was observed in all patient groups compared with controls, suggesting a reduced descending inhibitory system in CP. In sum, CP of different etiologies showed a mixed peripheral and central pattern of neuronal alterations, which might contribute to the chronicity of pruritus with no differences between pruritus entities. Our findings may contribute to the development of future treatment strategies targeting these pathomechanisms.Copyright © 2019 The Authors. Published

2019 Journal of Investigative Dermatology

15. Brachioradial Pruritus

Brachioradial Pruritus Brachioradial Pruritus Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Brachioradial Pruritus Brachioradial (...) Pruritus Aka: Brachioradial Pruritus , Brachioradialis Pruritus , Actinic Brachioradial Neuralgia From Related Chapters II. Epidemiology Affects Caucasians living in tropical regions More common in middle-aged women III. Pathophysiology: Postulated Mechanisms with nerve compression Prolonged ultraviolet light exposure (e.g. tropics) IV. Symptoms Onset often in mid-summer and resolution in December of one or both arms Affects lateral upper arms and s Affects dorsal s Other s (tingling or burning) V

2015 FP Notebook

16. Brachioradial pruritus as a result of cervical spine pathology: The results of a magnetic resonance tomography study. (PubMed)

Brachioradial pruritus as a result of cervical spine pathology: The results of a magnetic resonance tomography study. Brachioradial pruritus (BRP) describes a rare form of itching occurring at the dorsolateral part of the forearms. Recent case reports suggest that BRP may be attributed to cervical lesions or spine neoplasms.We sought to determine the incidence of cervical spine changes in BRP and to correlate the localization of spinal lesions with the dermatomal presence of pruritus.Magnetic (...) or protrusions of the cervical disk led to nerve compression. The location of the nerve compression lesions correlated significantly with the dermatomal localization of the pruritus (Spearman correlation coefficient 0.893; P < .01). No spinal neoplasm was observed, and 19.5% of the patients had degenerative changes without significant correlation to the dermatomal localization of pruritus.No healthy control group without pruritus was investigated.BRP may result from cervical nerve compression, and rarely

2011 Journal of American Academy of Dermatology

17. Aprepitant for the Treatment of Chronic Refractory Pruritus (PubMed)

, hyperuricemia, iron deficiency, brachioradial pruritus, and Hodgkin's lymphoma have experienced considerable symptom relief with short-term use of aprepitant (up to two weeks). Due to differences in reporting and evaluation of drug effects, the mechanism of aprepitant's role is difficult to understand based on the current literature. Herein, we evaluate aprepitant's antipruritic effects and discuss its mechanism of action and adverse effects. We propose that aprepitant is an alternative for patients (...) Aprepitant for the Treatment of Chronic Refractory Pruritus Chronic pruritus is a difficult condition to treat and is associated with several comorbidities, including insomnia, depression, and decreased quality of life. Treatment for chronic itch includes corticosteroids, antihistamines, and systemic therapies such as naltrexone, gabapentin, UV light therapy, and immunomodulatory treatments, including azathioprine, methotrexate, and cellcept. However, some patients still remain refractory

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2017 BioMed research international

18. Delayed, transient, postsolar truncal pruritus: a report of two cases. (PubMed)

Delayed, transient, postsolar truncal pruritus: a report of two cases. We present two cases of a rare clinical condition presenting as a delayed and transient pruritus of the trunk following sun exposure. These cases differ from previously reported conditions such as brachioradial pruritus because of the transient nature and anatomical location of the itching. These two cases extend the clinical spectrum of sun-induced pruritus. The patients' initial response to rigorous sun protection is good

2014 Clinical & Experimental Dermatology

19. Gabapentin for pruritus in palliative care. (PubMed)

with each other, hence neuropathic analgesics like gabapentin has shown to be efficacious antipruritic therapeutic option. Gabapentin impedes transmitting nociceptive sensations to brain, thus also suppressing pruritus. Gabapentin is safe and found to be effective in uremic pruritus, cancer/hematologic causes, opiod-induced itch, brachioradial pruritis, burns pruritus, and pruritus of unknown origin. Further research is required in this area to establish whether gabapentin is consistently effective. (...) Gabapentin for pruritus in palliative care. Itch/pruritus can be very distressing in palliative care population and often is difficult to treat. Conventional antihistamines lack efficacy. Cutaneous and central pathogenesis of itch is extremely complex and unclear, making its treatment challenging. Neuronal mechanisms have been identified in the pathophysiology of itch hence providing a myriad of therapeutic options. It has been established that pruritus and pain neuronal pathway interact

2013 American Journal of Hospice and Palliative Medicine

20. Proof of Concept of VLY-686 in Subjects With Treatment-Resistant Pruritus Associated With Atopic Dermatitis

, electrocardiogram, clinical laboratory tests and urinalysis. Exclusion Criteria: Chronic pruritus due to conditions other than atopic dermatitis (AD) including the following conditions: Prurigo nodularis, Lichen simplex chronicus, Bullous pemphigoid; Other non-AD subjects (notalgia paresthetica, brachioradial pruritus, somatoform prurigo, dilusional parasitosis, depression associated prurigo); Acute superinfection of AD; Current and past systematic use of topical or systemic antihistamines (2 weeks prior (...) Proof of Concept of VLY-686 in Subjects With Treatment-Resistant Pruritus Associated With Atopic Dermatitis Proof of Concept of VLY-686 in Subjects With Treatment-Resistant Pruritus Associated With Atopic Dermatitis - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies

2013 Clinical Trials

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