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Boston Criteria for Febrile Infant 28-89 days

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1. Boston Criteria for Febrile Infant 28-89 days

Boston Criteria for Febrile Infant 28-89 days Boston Criteria for Febrile Infant 28-89 days Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer (...) Administration 4 Boston Criteria for Febrile Infant 28-89 days Boston Criteria for Febrile Infant 28-89 days Aka: Boston Criteria for Febrile Infant 28-89 days , Boston Criteria for Febrile Infant , Boston Criteria for Evaluation of the Infant with Fever , Febrile Infant Evaluation with Boston Criteria II. Indications Assessment of febrile child (>38 C) aged 28-89 days Reassures against serious infection ( ) III. Criteria: Reassuring if all criteria are present Well appearing infant No skeletal, soft tissue

2018 FP Notebook

2. Boston Criteria for Febrile Infant 28-89 days

Boston Criteria for Febrile Infant 28-89 days Boston Criteria for Febrile Infant 28-89 days Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer (...) Administration 4 Boston Criteria for Febrile Infant 28-89 days Boston Criteria for Febrile Infant 28-89 days Aka: Boston Criteria for Febrile Infant 28-89 days , Boston Criteria for Febrile Infant , Boston Criteria for Evaluation of the Infant with Fever , Febrile Infant Evaluation with Boston Criteria II. Indications Assessment of febrile child (>38 C) aged 28-89 days Reassures against serious infection ( ) III. Criteria: Reassuring if all criteria are present Well appearing infant No skeletal, soft tissue

2015 FP Notebook

3. The Effect of Traumatic Lumbar Puncture on Hospitalization Rate for Febrile Infants 28 to 60 Days of Age. (PubMed)

The Effect of Traumatic Lumbar Puncture on Hospitalization Rate for Febrile Infants 28 to 60 Days of Age. The authors measured the effect of a traumatic or unsuccessful lumbar puncture (LP) on the management of febrile infants.This was a 10-year retrospective cross-sectional study of low-risk infants by the "Boston" criteria 28 to 60 days of age presenting to the emergency department for evaluation of fever. "Normal LP" infants had cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) WBC < 10 × 10(6) cells/L. "Traumatic (...) (72.3% traumatic or unsuccessful LP vs. 18.1% normal LP; difference = 54.1%; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 46.4% to 60.8%), but a similar SBI rate (2.9% vs. 4.1%; difference = 1.2%; 95% CI = -2.7% to 3.6%). No infant had proven bacterial meningitis (0% risk, 95% CI = 0 to 0.3%).Low-risk infants aged 28 to 60 days with traumatic or unsuccessful LPs are more frequently hospitalized, although SBI rates were similar to those of infants with normal LPs.© 2015 by the Society for Academic Emergency

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2015 Academic Emergency Medicine

4. Diagnosis and management of febrile infants (0-3 months)

91 to 96; Ι²=24.5%; seven studies) and specificity 49% (95% CI 47 to 51; Ι²=95.9%; seven studies). The pooled sensitivity for the Philadelphia protocol was 93% (95% CI 89 to 95; Ι²=75.5%; six studies) and specificity 46% (95% CI 44 to 48; Ι²=96.8%; six studies).The Boston, Philadelphia and Milwaukee criteria showed better overall accuracy in older infants than in neonates. The Rochester criteria were more accurate in neonates. Clinical history alone (15 studies) showed higher sensitivity (94.0 (...) separately on infants aged zero to 28 days, one to two months, and two to three months. They should examine the subtypes of serious bacterial infection and report fully on the harms of diagnostic and observational protocols. Funding Funded by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, USA. Bibliographic details Hui C, Neto G, Tsertsvadze A, Yazdi F, Tricco AC, Tsouros S, Skidmore B, Daniel R. Diagnosis and management of febrile infants (0-3 months) Rockville, MD, USA: Agency for Healthcare Research

2013 DARE.

5. Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in Infants and Children With Cardiac Disease

Norwood Downloaded from http://ahajournals.org by on March 27, 2019Marino et al CPR in Infants and Children With Cardiac Disease May 29, 2018 Circulation. 2018;137:e691–e782. DOI: 10.1161/CIR.0000000000000524 e698 CLINICAL STATEMENTS AND GUIDELINES palliation, the need for an unplanned shunt interven- tion is higher with the RVPAS. 28 Prophylactic anticoagulation strategies include hepa- rin therapy early after shunt placement, with a transi- tion to aspirin when enteral medications are tolerated. 23 (...) Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in Infants and Children With Cardiac Disease Circulation. 2018;137:e691–e782. DOI: 10.1161/CIR.0000000000000524 May 29, 2018 e691 ABSTRACT: Cardiac arrest occurs at a higher rate in children with heart disease than in healthy children. Pediatric basic life support and advanced life support guidelines focus on delivering high- quality resuscitation in children with normal hearts. The complexity and variability in pediatric heart disease pose unique challenges during

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2018 American Heart Association

6. New Protocol for Febrile Neonate Management

protocols and new protocol in evaluating only febrile neonate. [ Time Frame: 5 years ] All infants were classified at low-risk by the criteria of Rochester, Boston, Philadelphia and new created Sisli Etfal protocols. Eligibility Criteria Go to Information from the National Library of Medicine Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may (...) contact the study research staff using the contacts provided below. For general information, Layout table for eligibility information Ages Eligible for Study: up to 28 Days (Child) Sexes Eligible for Study: All Accepts Healthy Volunteers: No Sampling Method: Non-Probability Sample Study Population newborn babies admitted to hospital with fever Criteria Inclusion Criteria: All neonates who were admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit with a rectal temperature of ≥38°C (documented at the time

2017 Clinical Trials

7. Evaluating the Infectivity, Safety, and Immunogenicity of the Recombinant Live-Attenuated Respiratory Syncytial Virus Vaccines RSV ΔNS2/Δ1313/I1314L or RSV 276 in RSV-Seronegative Infants 6 to 24 Months of Age

tests, both from samples collected at greater than or equal to 24 weeks of age. Exclusion Criteria: Known or suspected HIV infection or impairment of immunological functions. Receipt of immunosuppressive therapy, including any systemic, including either nasal or inhaled, corticosteroids within 28 days of enrollment. Note: Cutaneous (topical) steroid treatment is not an exclusion. Any receipt of bone marrow/solid organ transplant. Major congenital malformations (such as congenital cleft palate (...) to any study product component. Heart disease. Note: Participants with cardiac abnormalities documented to be clinically insignificant and requiring no treatment may be enrolled. Lung disease, including any history of reactive airway disease or medically diagnosed wheezing. Member of a household that contains, or will contain, an infant who is less than 6 months of age at the enrollment date through Day 28. Member of a household that contains another child/other children who

2017 Clinical Trials

8. The Management of Community-Acquired Pneumonia in Infants and Children Older Than 3 Months of Age

evidence) 89. All infants ≥6 months of age and all children and adolescents should be immunized annually with vaccines for influenza virus to prevent CAP. (strong recommendation; high-quality evidence) 90. Parents and caretakers of infants <6 months of age, including pregnant adolescents, should be immunized with vaccines for influenza virus and pertussis to protect the infants from exposure. (strong recommendation; weak-quality evidence) 91. Pneumococcal CAP after influenza virus infection (...) The Management of Community-Acquired Pneumonia in Infants and Children Older Than 3 Months of Age We use cookies to enhance your experience on our website. By continuing to use our website, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. You can change your cookie settings at any time. Management of Community-Acquired Pneumonia in Infants and Children Older Than 3 Months of Age: Clinical Practice Guidelines by the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society and the Infectious Diseases Society of America

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2011 Infectious Diseases Society of America

9. Asymptomatic Bacteriuria

Sciences Centre 820 Sherbrook St, School of Medicine, Rady Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, R3A 1R9, Canada (Lindsay.Nicolle@umanitoba.ca). Clinical Infectious Diseases ® 2019;XX(XX):1–28 © The Author(s) 2019. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com. DOI: 10.1093/cid/ciy1121 Clinical Practice Guideline for the Management of Asymptomatic Bacteriuria (...) , University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada; 2 Division of Infectious Diseases, Veterans Affairs Boston Healthcare System and Boston University School of Medicine, West Roxbury, Massachusetts; 3 Division of Infectious Diseases, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor; 4 Department of Family and Community Medicine, University of Maryland, Baltimore; 5 Division of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Department of Pediatrics, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison; 6 Division of Infectious

2019 Infectious Diseases Society of America

10. Chimeric Antigen Receptor T-Cell Therapy for B-Cell Cancers: Effectiveness and Value

progression, two from CRS, one from a pulmonary embolus, and four in patients with disease progression who were on subsequent therapies. The key AEs experienced by the 99 patients who received an infusion of tisagenlecleucel in the JULIET trial are summarized in Table ES10 below. 30 Table ES10. Key Adverse Events in the JULIET Trial (n=99) Adverse Event All Grades Grade 3 or Higher Cytokine Release Syndrome 58% 23% Neurologic Toxicities 21% 12% Infections 34% 20% Cytopenias Not Resolved by Day 28 36% 27 (...) $10,000 from the following health care and life sciences organizations: the Association of Community Cancer Centers, America’s Health Insurance Plans, AIM Specialty Health, the American College of Chest Physicians, the American Society of Clinical Oncology, Barclays, Defined Health, Express Scripts, Genentech, Goldman Sachs, McKinsey and Company, MPM Capital, the National Comprehensive Cancer Network, Biotechnology Industry Organization, The American Journal of Managed Care, Boston Consulting Group

2018 California Technology Assessment Forum

11. WHO recommendations: non-clinical interventions to reduce unnecessary caesarean sections

evidence (49,50) and related literature on strategies for optimizing identification of qualitative studies in MEDLINE (51), Embase (52), CINAHL (53) and PsycINFO (54). Details of the search strategies and study inclusion and exclusion criteria are described in the individual reviews (26–28). c. Evidence on implementation considerations for non-clinical interventions to reduce unnecessary caesareans Implementation factors included context-specific factors (barriers and enablers) that may have an impact (...) with mandatory second opinion for caesarean indication Recommendation 2.1 36 3.3. Implementation of evidence-based clinical practice guidelines combined with audit and feedback Recommendation 2.2 41 C. INTERVENTIONS T ARGETED A T HEAL TH ORGANIZA TIONS, F ACILITIES OR SYSTEMS 45 3.4. Collaborative midwifery-obstetrician model of care in which the obstetrician provides in-house labour and delivery coverage, 24 hours a day, without competing clinical duties. Recommendation 3.1 45 3.5. Financial strategies

2018 World Health Organisation Guidelines

12. Chimeric Antigen Receptor T-Cell Therapy for B-Cell Cancers: Effectiveness and Value

of tisagenlecleucel in the JULIET trial are summarized in Table ES10 below. 29 Table ES10. Key Adverse Events in the JULIET Trial (n=99) Adverse Event All Grades Grade 3 or Higher Cytokine Release Syndrome 58% 23% Neurologic Toxicities 21% 12% Infections 34% 20% Cytopenias Not Resolved by Day 28 36% 27% Febrile Neutropenia 13% 13% Tumor Lysis Syndrome 1% 1% There were no deaths or reported cases of cerebral edema. Finally, there are theoretical concerns about mutagenesis from the insertion of the transgene (...) criteria as ZUMA-1 trial to select a subset of patients with aggressive DLBCL. ©Institute for Clinical and Economic Review, 2018 Page ES10 Evidence Report – CAR-T Therapies for B-Cell Cancers Return to Table of Contents Table ES6. Objective Response Rates Reported for Axicabtagene Ciloleucel for Relapsed or Refractory Adult B-cell Lymphoma Compared with SCHOLAR-1 Trial Therapy ORR CR ZUMA-1 28 Axicabtagene ciloleucel 82% 54% NCT00924326 12 Axicabtagene ciloleucel 73% 55% SCHOLAR-1 17 Mix of salvage

2018 California Technology Assessment Forum

13. Diagnosis, Treatment, and Long-Term Management of Kawasaki Disease: A Scientific Statement for Health Professionals From the American Heart Association

is based on the presence of ≥5 days of fever (first calendar day of fever is illness day 1) and the presence of ≥4 of the 5 principal clinical features ( , ). In the presence of >4 principal clinical criteria, particularly when redness and swelling of the hands and feet are present, the diagnosis may be made with only 4 days of fever. Similarly, experienced clinicians who have treated many KD patients may make the diagnosis in rare instances with only 3 days of fever in the presence of a classic (...) clinical features ( ) should be considered before the diagnosis of KD is made, because the principal clinical findings that fulfill the diagnostic criteria are not specific. The presence of exudative conjunctivitis, exudative pharyngitis, oral ulcerations, splenomegaly, and vesiculobullous or petechial rashes should prompt consideration of another diagnosis. Measles shares many clinical features with KD and should be considered in the differential diagnosis in any unimmunized infant or child. KD occurs

2017 American Heart Association

14. Platelet Transfusion for Patients With Cancer

been reported, , and the storage time from collection to transfusion is limited to 5 days. In some countries and jurisdictions, the latter can be extended to 7 days if approved tests for bacterial detection or pathogen reduction technologies are used to further decrease the risk of transfusion-transmitted infections. , Transfusion-associated bacteremia should be suspected if patients experience severe febrile reactions either during or shortly after platelet transfusions. The transfusion should (...) Platelet Transfusion for Patients With Cancer Platelet Transfusion for Patients With Cancer: American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline Update | Journal of Clinical Oncology Search in: Menu Article Tools ASCO SPECIAL ARTICLE Article Tools OPTIONS & TOOLS COMPANION ARTICLES June, 10 2018 ARTICLE CITATION DOI: 10.1200/JCO.2017.76.1734 Journal of Clinical Oncology - published online before print November 28, 2017 PMID: Platelet Transfusion for Patients With Cancer: American

2017 American Society of Clinical Oncology Guidelines

15. NASPGHAN Clinical Report on the Diagnosis and Treatment of Gluten-related Disorders

for these conditions. Received June 18, 2015; accepted March 21, 2016. From the The Ohio State University College of Medicine, Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Columbus, the y Center for Celiac Research, Mas- sachusetts General Hospital for Children and Celiac Program, Harvard Medical School, Boston, the z Section of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, Celiac Disease Center, University of Chicago, IL, the § Center for Celiac Disease, Digestive Health Institute, Children’s Hospital Colorado (...) /arthralgia (25). Although children with low–bone TABLE 1. Common clinical manifestations of gluten-related disorders Celiac NCGS WA Time from exposure to symptoms Hours-months Hours-days Minutes-hours Gastrointestinal Diarrhea X X X Abdominal pain X X X Constipation X X X Gas/bloat/distention X X X Poor weight gain X X X Malodorous fatty stools X Vomiting X X X Extraintestinal Pubertal delay X Unexplained weight loss X X X Poor height gain X Bone/joint pain X X X Rash of DH X Eczema X X Hives/atopic

2016 North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition

17. Urinary Tract Infection?Child

of diffusion-weighted imaging with gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted imaging. Eur Radiol. 2014;24(1):19-25. 63. Kocyigit A, Bayram R, Yuksel S, Yilmaz I, Karabulut N. Diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging of kidneys in children with vesicoureteral reflux. Eur J Radiol. 2014;83(1):e56-60. 64. Bonadio W, Maida G. Urinary tract infection in outpatient febrile infants younger than 30 days of age: a 10- year evaluation. Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2014;33(4):342-344. 65. Bisset GS, 3rd, Strife JL, Dunbar JS (...) Urinary Tract Infection?Child Revised2016 ACR Appropriateness Criteria ® 1 Urinary Tract Infection–Child American College of Radiology ACR Appropriateness Criteria ® Urinary Tract Infection–Child Variant 1: Age 2 months and =6 years, first febrile urinary tract infection with good response to treatment. Radiologic Procedure Rating Comments RRL* US kidneys and bladder 7 This procedure has a low yield, especially if US in the third trimester is normal. O Voiding cystourethrography 4 ?? Tc-99m

2016 American College of Radiology

18. Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®): Health Professional Version

) Cancer in children and adolescents is rare, although the overall incidence of childhood cancer, including ALL, has been slowly increasing since 1975.[ ] Dramatic improvements in survival have been achieved in children and adolescents with cancer.[ - ] Between 1975 and 2010, childhood cancer mortality decreased by more than 50%.[ - ] For ALL, the 5-year survival rate has increased over the same time from 60% to approximately 90% for children younger than 15 years and from 28% to more than 75 (...) ), with rates decreasing to fewer than 30 cases per 1 million by age 8 years.[ , ] The incidence of ALL among children aged 2 to 3 years is approximately fourfold greater than that for infants and is likewise fourfold to fivefold greater than that for children aged 10 years and older.[ , ] The incidence of ALL appears to be highest in Hispanic children (43 cases per 1 million).[ , , , ] The incidence is substantially higher in white children than in black children, with a nearly threefold higher incidence

2018 PDQ - NCI's Comprehensive Cancer Database

19. Childhood Liver Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Health Professional Version

]. Bethesda (MD): ; 2002-. Search term Childhood Liver Cancer Treatment (PDQ®) Health Professional Version PDQ Pediatric Treatment Editorial Board . Published online: November 28, 2018. This PDQ cancer information summary for health professionals provides comprehensive, peer-reviewed, evidence-based information about the treatment of childhood liver cancer. It is intended as a resource to inform and assist clinicians who care for cancer patients. It does not provide formal guidelines or recommendations (...) . [ ] [ ] De Ioris M, Brugieres L, Zimmermann A, et al.: Hepatoblastoma with a low serum alpha-fetoprotein level at diagnosis: the SIOPEL group experience. Eur J Cancer 44 (4): 545-50, 2008. [ ] Pritchard J, Brown J, Shafford E, et al.: Cisplatin, doxorubicin, and delayed surgery for childhood hepatoblastoma: a successful approach--results of the first prospective study of the International Society of Pediatric Oncology. J Clin Oncol 18 (22): 3819-28, 2000. [ ] Perilongo G, Brown J, Shafford E, et al

2018 PDQ - NCI's Comprehensive Cancer Database

20. Late Effects of Treatment for Childhood Cancer (PDQ®): Health Professional Version

Summaries [Internet]. Bethesda (MD): ; 2002-. Search term Late Effects of Treatment for Childhood Cancer (PDQ®) Health Professional Version PDQ Pediatric Treatment Editorial Board . Published online: September 28, 2018. Created: April 23, 2004 . This PDQ cancer information summary for health professionals provides comprehensive, peer-reviewed, evidence-based information about the late effects of treatment for childhood cancer. It is intended as a resource to inform and assist clinicians who care (...) the St. Jude Lifetime Cohort Study. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 25 (9): 1356-60, 2016. [ ] [ ] Turcotte LM, Liu Q, Yasui Y, et al.: Temporal Trends in Treatment and Subsequent Neoplasm Risk Among 5-Year Survivors of Childhood Cancer, 1970-2015. JAMA 317 (8): 814-824, 2017. [ ] [ ] Armstrong GT, Pan Z, Ness KK, et al.: Temporal trends in cause-specific late mortality among 5-year survivors of childhood cancer. J Clin Oncol 28 (7): 1224-31, 2010. [ ] [ ] Bhatia S, Robison LL, Francisco L, et al

2018 PDQ - NCI's Comprehensive Cancer Database

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