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Booster Car Seat

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1. Booster Car Seat

Booster Car Seat Booster Car Seat Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Booster Car Seat Booster Car Seat Aka: Booster Car (...) ) Used for child weight over 40 pounds Otherwise same as high-back Booster Seat above No-back or low-back shielded Booster Seat (avoid) Used for child over 40 pounds No head or neck protection in rear-end impact IV. Recommended Booster Seat Century Breverra Premiere 4885 or 4880 ($60) V. References Images: Related links to external sites (from Bing) These images are a random sampling from a Bing search on the term "Booster Car Seat." Click on the image (or right click) to open the source website

2018 FP Notebook

2. Randomized Control Trial of Booster Seat Education Material to Increase Perceived Benefit Among Parents

Old in Canada. Actual Study Start Date : December 10, 2018 Actual Primary Completion Date : December 28, 2018 Actual Study Completion Date : December 28, 2018 Arms and Interventions Go to Arm Intervention/treatment Active Comparator: Current material Participants in this arm will be shown the online Transport Canada Material that is currently available at: https://www.tc.gc.ca/en/services/road/child-car-seat-safety/installing-using-child-car-seat-booster-seat-seat-belt/stage-3-booster-seats.html (...) Randomized Control Trial of Booster Seat Education Material to Increase Perceived Benefit Among Parents Randomized Control Trial of Booster Seat Education Material to Increase Perceived Benefit Among Parents - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100

2018 Clinical Trials

3. Promoting booster seat use for young children: A school-based intervention pilot study (PubMed)

Promoting booster seat use for young children: A school-based intervention pilot study Misuse and/or lack of booster seat use are often associated with high rates of injury and death among school-aged children. This pilot study examined the efficacy and the potential effectiveness of a booster seat intervention in the classroom.Two elementary schools participated (randomly assigned as one intervention school and one control school). At the intervention school, a certified car seat specialist (...) and a police officer held an interactive booster seat session. The height and age for each child were recorded. Children received a certificate indicating whether they met the requirements for booster seat use and a postcard with car seat restraint specifications. Children in the control school received a brochure on car seat safety. Pre- and post-intervention self-reports were collected and booster seat use was observed.Observational findings showed a decline in booster seat use at the control school

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2017 Paediatrics & child health

4. Video-Based Social Learning or Didactics for Car Seat Education

question 10-point Likert scale assessment is scored 1-10 (1 = not confident; 10 = very confident). Confidence is defined as a 9 or 10 on the Likert scale. 15-Question Car Seat Installation Knowledge Test [ Time Frame: 30 minutes ] Self reported objective knowledge test with questions about the four steps for child passenger safety (rear facing seat, forward facing seat, booster seat, and seat belt/shoulder harness) and the LATCH (Lower Anchors and Tethers for Children) system. The test contains true (...) Video-Based Social Learning or Didactics for Car Seat Education Video-Based Social Learning or Didactics for Car Seat Education - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. Video-Based Social Learning

2016 Clinical Trials

5. Built-In Car Seats

-In Car Seats , Integrated Child Seat From Related Chapters II. Indication Over 1 year old and over 20 pounds III. Description Available on some GM, Ford, Chrysler and Volvo Typically uses 5 point harness Converts to booster in many cases IV. Precautions Most versions lack head support for sleeping child Some new cars will include reclining design Images: Related links to external sites (from Bing) These images are a random sampling from a Bing search on the term "Built-In Car Seats." Click (...) Built-In Car Seats Built-In Car Seats Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Built-In Car Seats Built-In Car Seats Aka: Built

2018 FP Notebook

6. Booster Car Seat

Booster Car Seat Booster Car Seat Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Booster Car Seat Booster Car Seat Aka: Booster Car (...) ) Used for child weight over 40 pounds Otherwise same as high-back Booster Seat above No-back or low-back shielded Booster Seat (avoid) Used for child over 40 pounds No head or neck protection in rear-end impact IV. Recommended Booster Seat Century Breverra Premiere 4885 or 4880 ($60) V. References Images: Related links to external sites (from Bing) These images are a random sampling from a Bing search on the term "Booster Car Seat." Click on the image (or right click) to open the source website

2015 FP Notebook

7. What we know about kids and car seats

, infants and young children are required to use car seats in all 50 states. And 48 states require booster seats for older children. ( lists specific laws for each state.) Even though fewer children are dying in car accidents than ever before, So safety experts continue to learn more about how children respond in car crashes, and update the guidelines about how to keep kids safe. The latest recommendation — — recommends that children sit in rear-facing seats for as long as possible, at least until age 2 (...) What we know about kids and car seats What we know about kids and car seats Bridging the gap between research and real life You are here: / / What we know about kids and car seats What we know about kids and car seats September 22, 2015 By Car seat technology has certainly come a long way in the past three decades. I have clear memories sitting in the front seat of my mom’s car (and playing with the radio buttons!) at age five — a practice that is now against the law in most states. Today

2015 Evidence Based Living blog

8. Safety in Seconds 2.0: An App to Increase Car Seat Use

seat use at 6 months [ Time Frame: 6 months ] Self-reported measures include the type of car seat used (rear-facing car seat, forward-facing car seat, booster seat, or seat belt), the location in car where it is used (front seat or backseat), frequency of use (some of the time or all of the time) and having the seat inspected by a car seat technician. Secondary Outcome Measures : Change from baseline self-reported smoke alarm use at 6 months [ Time Frame: 6 months ] Self-reported measures include (...) Safety in Seconds 2.0: An App to Increase Car Seat Use Safety in Seconds 2.0: An App to Increase Car Seat Use - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. Safety in Seconds 2.0: An App to Increase Car

2015 Clinical Trials

9. Child Car Safety: A Parental Survey at a Tertiary Care Emergency Treatment Center in Greece. (PubMed)

on a daily basis. Forward-facing restraint seats were most popular, with 53.9% total use even in children younger than 2 years or older than 4 years, whereas booster seats (9.4%) and rear-facing restraint seats (18.2%) were inappropriately disfavored. Children younger than 4 years, male drivers, and drivers who had received information on CCS had higher odds of using CRS. The proportion of those had never been provided any CCS education was 38.5%.Child restraint systems use was inappropriately low under (...) routine conditions and declined even further under emergency circumstances. Most children younger than 2 years and older than 4 years traveled inappropriately restrained in a forward-facing restraint seat. Parents should be more intensively educated on child car safety seat and the proper CRS use.

2018 Pediatric Emergency Care

10. Carpooling and booster seats: a national survey of parents. (PubMed)

and carpooling.Of 1612 parents responding to the full survey (response rate = 71%), 706 had a 4- to 8-year-old child and 681 met inclusion rules. Most parents (76%) reported their child used a safety seat when riding in the family car. Of children reported to use seat belts, 74% did so in accordance with their state law. Parent report of child safety seat use was associated with younger child age and with the presence of state booster seat laws. Sixty-four percent of parents carpool. Among parents who carpool (...) Carpooling and booster seats: a national survey of parents. Booster seat use among school-aged children has been consistently lower than national goals. In this study, we sought to explore associations between parental experiences with booster seats and carpooling.We conducted a cross-sectional Web-based survey of a nationally representative panel of US parents in January 2010. As part of a larger survey, parents of 4- to 8-year-old children responded to 12 questions related to booster seats

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2012 Pediatrics

11. Built-In Car Seats

-In Car Seats , Integrated Child Seat From Related Chapters II. Indication Over 1 year old and over 20 pounds III. Description Available on some GM, Ford, Chrysler and Volvo Typically uses 5 point harness Converts to booster in many cases IV. Precautions Most versions lack head support for sleeping child Some new cars will include reclining design Images: Related links to external sites (from Bing) These images are a random sampling from a Bing search on the term "Built-In Car Seats." Click (...) Built-In Car Seats Built-In Car Seats Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Built-In Car Seats Built-In Car Seats Aka: Built

2015 FP Notebook

12. Effect of Booster Seat Design on Children’s Choice of Seating Positions During Naturalistic Riding (PubMed)

Effect of Booster Seat Design on Children’s Choice of Seating Positions During Naturalistic Riding The purpose of this naturalistic study was to investigate the effect of booster seat design on the choice of children's seating positions during naturalistic riding. Data was collected through observations of children during in-vehicle riding by means of a film camera. The children were positioned in high back boosters in the rear seat while a parent drove the car. The study included two (...) different booster designs: one with large head and torso side supports, and one with small head side supports and no torso side supports. Six children between three and six years of age participated in the study. Each child was observed in both boosters. The duration of the seating positions that each child assumed was quantified. The design with large side head supports resulted more often in seating positions without head and shoulder contact with the booster's back. There was shoulder-to-booster back

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2010 Annals of Advances in Automotive Medicine / Annual Scientific Conference

13. Kinematics of child volunteers and child anthropomorphic test devices during emergency braking events in real car environment. (PubMed)

) and HIII 10-year-old were restrained on booster cushions or restrained by 3-point belts directly on the car seat. Vehicle data were collected and synchronized with video data. Forward trajectories for the forehead and external auditory canal (ear) were determined as well as head rotation and shoulder belt force.A total of 40 trials were analyzed. Child volunteers had greater maximum forward displacement of the head and greater head rotation compared to the ATDs. The average maximum displacement (...) (HIII) 3-year-old, 6-year-old, and 10-year-old ATDs restrained on the right rear seat of a modern passenger vehicle. The children were exposed to one braking event in each of the 2 restraint systems and the ATDs were exposed to 2 braking events in each restraint system. All events had a deceleration of 1.0 g. Short children (stature 107-123 cm) and the Q3, HIII 3-year-old, and 6-year-old were restrained on booster cushions as well as high-back booster seats. Tall children (stature 135-150 cm

2013 Traffic injury prevention

14. Trends and Correlates of Child Passenger Restraint Use in 6 Northwest Tribes: The Native Children Always Ride Safe (Native CARS) Project. (PubMed)

and evaluated correlates of improper restraint via log-binomial regression models for clustered data.We observed 1853 children aged 12 years and younger in 1207 vehicles; 49% rode properly restrained. More children aged 8 years and younger rode properly restrained in 2009 than 2003 (51% vs 29%; P < .001). Older booster seat-eligible children were least likely to ride properly restrained in 2009 (25%). American Indian children were more likely to ride improperly restrained than nonnative children in the same (...) Trends and Correlates of Child Passenger Restraint Use in 6 Northwest Tribes: The Native Children Always Ride Safe (Native CARS) Project. We compared proportions of children properly restrained in vehicles in 6 Northwest American Indian tribes in 2003 and 2009, and evaluated risks for improper restraint.During spring 2009 we conducted a vehicle observation survey in Oregon, Washington, and Idaho tribal communities. We estimated the proportions of children riding properly restrained

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2012 American Journal of Public Health

15. Preparing HIV-infected children and adolescents for travel

for patients to access themselves: http://www.fitfortravel.nhs.uk Once the trip is planned, advise on following: • Road traffic accidents are the leading cause of death for all travellers, use car seats and seat belts for children as you would in the UK, be vigilant of vehicles whilst walking near the roadside. • Drowning is the second leading cause of death in paediatric travellers. Children must be supervised when swimming in pools and must not dive until depth is established. • Waterborne infections can (...) reconstitution on ARVs. One dose provides protection for a year and a second dose at 6 months provides protection for at least 20 years in HIV negative individuals. The efficacy in HIV-infected children is lower (7), especially with lower CD4 counts, as it is in adults (8). Children with low CD4 counts may benefit from further doses, this is best assessed with serology. The duration of protection in HIV positive children is known to wane between two and five years (9) with some recommending boosters

2018 The Children's HIV Association

16. An update to the Greig Health Record: Preventive health care visits for children and adolescents aged 6 to 17 years ? Technical report

Society, Parachute, and Canada Safety Council websites. - Helmet safety There is good evidence to support the use of bicycle helmets, with studies showing an overall decrease in the risk of head and brain injury of 65% to 88%. - Legislative interventions are also clearly effective in reducing head injuries, but only 8 of 13 Canadian provinces or territories have enacted bicycle helmet legislation. - Vehicle safety There is good evidence to support the use of booster seats for children between the ages (...) of 5 and 7 and the use of seat belts for children aged 8 and older. - There is considerable variation in booster seat legislation in Canada. Some provinces or territories have laws requiring booster seat use until children are 8, 9 or even 10 years of age, while others have no age mandates. Physicians should counsel parents on when it is safe to graduate children to seat belt use and especially to avoid premature graduation for smaller children. Guidelines clarifying graduation by weight, height

2016 Canadian Paediatric Society

17. Statement on international travellers who intend to visit friends and relatives

the burden of injuries in VFRs, numerous characteristics of VFRs are assumed to increase injury risk. These characteristics include greater likelihood to use local modes of travel, longer trip durations, and taking part in local activities. Where use of motorcycles or bicycles is necessary, VFRs should be encouraged to use helmets (80). The use of other available road-safety precautions such as seat belts and infant/child car seats should also be recommended (80). For more information on injury risk (...) standard road-safety precautions such as seat belts and infant/child car seats. • Refer to CATMAT’s Statement on Risk of Injury and Travel (80) * South Asia is defined as per the World Bank classification (44) and includes Afghanistan, Pakistan, India, Nepal, Bangladesh, Maldives, Sri Lanka, and Bhutan. Among these countries, the large majority (=90%) of cases of typhoid among travellers were reported from India, Pakistan and Bangladesh.38 STATEMENT ON INTERNATIONAL TRAVELLERS WHO INTEND TO VISIT

2015 CPG Infobase

18. Halloween Rules of the Road

at a crosswalk – they may be stopped for a pedestrian. Do not drive under the influence. Every 51 minutes, in the United States dies in a motor vehicle crash that involves an alcohol-impaired driver. Properly buckle kids no matter how short the trip. Properly buckling children in their car seats, booster seats, and seat belts when transporting them and making sure that their costumes don’t interfere with them being properly buckled. Learn more CDC: CDC : CDC : CDC : CDC : Safe Kids Worldwide: National Safety (...) address: Enter Email Address Submit Button Halloween Rules of the Road Posted on October 27, 2017 by Blog Administrator Halloween is an exciting time for kids and adults – the delight of dressing up in a fun costume, all of the spooky decorations, and of course let’s not forget the candy. Traditionally, kids trick-or-treat at night – going house-to-house in their costumes. On average, children are more than to be hit by a car and killed on Halloween than on any other day of the year. Children

2017 CDC Public Health Matters

19. Road Trauma Prevention

for younger riders, to reduce off-road motorcycle injuries • Support for identifiers on all motorcycles VEHICLE SAFETY - CAR Recognising the major role that vehicle standards and features play in the reduction of road trauma, the College recommends the following measures be supported: • Vehicle safety features such as, but not limited to, front, side and curtain airbags, anti-lock braking systems, electronic stability control and aggressive seat belt reminder systems be installed in all new cars • Close (...) of approved seat belts or other restraints by all occupants wherever seated in a motor vehicle including buses, and there be no l exemption from wearing a restraint on medical grounds • Mandatory wearing of approved child restraints and use of booster seats for all children up to 135 cm • Support for Government loan and community-based schemes designed to improve availability of approved infant and child restraints SPEED Recognising the major role that excessive speed plays in the causation of serious

2015 ASERNIP-S

20. Situational Use of Child Restraint Systems and Carpooling Behaviors in Parents and Caregivers (PubMed)

4⁻10 years in their home, who could read and spoke English, and drove child ≥6 times in previous three months. We used descriptive statistics and Mann-Whitney U to describe and compare the distribution of responses to situational use of CRSs among car seat users and booster seat users. We also used descriptive statistics and the Mann-Whitney U to describe and compare the distribution of responses to carpooling items among booster seat users and non-booster seat users. There were significant (...) differences among those who reported most often using booster seats (n = 282) and car seats (n = 127) in situations involving rental cars, driving just around the corner, car too crowded to fit the CRS, not enough CRSs in the vehicle, the CRS is missing from the car, or the child is in someone else's car without a CRS (p < 0.05). Among those who reported most often using booster seats and who carpooled other children (n = 159), 71.7% (n = 114) always used a booster seat for their own child. When

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2018 International journal of environmental research and public health

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