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Booster Car Seat

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1. Booster Car Seat

Booster Car Seat Booster Car Seat Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Booster Car Seat Booster Car Seat Aka: Booster Car (...) Seat , Booster Seat From Related Chapters II. Indication Child age 4-8 years old or <57 inches tall See for guidelines III. Types High-back Booster Seat (includes harness system) Used for child over 20-30 pounds (over age 1 year) Child 40 pounds or less: Harness used Child over 40 pounds Harness removed from seat Seat raises child to use vehicle Clip at top of seat positions belt belt crosses mid-clavicle and mid-chest fits tightly over upper thighs High-back Booster Seat (without harness system

2018 FP Notebook

2. Built-In Car Seats

-In Car Seats , Integrated Child Seat From Related Chapters II. Indication Over 1 year old and over 20 pounds III. Description Available on some GM, Ford, Chrysler and Volvo Typically uses 5 point harness Converts to booster in many cases IV. Precautions Most versions lack head support for sleeping child Some new cars will include reclining design Images: Related links to external sites (from Bing) These images are a random sampling from a Bing search on the term "Built-In Car Seats." Click (...) Built-In Car Seats Built-In Car Seats Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Built-In Car Seats Built-In Car Seats Aka: Built

2018 FP Notebook

3. Emergency department transport rates of children from the scene of motor vehicle collisions: do booster seats make a difference? (Abstract)

Emergency department transport rates of children from the scene of motor vehicle collisions: do booster seats make a difference? Motor vehicle collisions (MVCs) are the leading cause of death and disability among children older than 1 year. Many states currently mandate all children between the ages of 4 and 8 years be restrained in booster seats. The implementation of a booster-seat law is generally thought to decrease the occurrence of injury to children. We hypothesized that appropriate (...) children (19.1%) in no restraint system. 76 children (47.7%), 74 by emergency medical services and 2 by private vehicle, were transported to the ED with no significant difference between restraint use (P = 0.534). Utilization of a restraint system did not significantly impact MVC injury severity. However, of those children who either died (n = 2) or had an on-scene decreased Glasgow Coma Scale score (n = 6), 75% (6/8) were not restrained in a booster seat.The use of booster-seat restraints does

2012 Pediatric Emergency Care

4. The impact of child safety restraint legislation on child injuries in police-reported motor vehicle collisions in British Columbia: An interrupted time series analysis Full Text available with Trip Pro

The impact of child safety restraint legislation on child injuries in police-reported motor vehicle collisions in British Columbia: An interrupted time series analysis Motor vehicle collisions (MVCs) remain a leading cause of death and serious injury in Canadian children. In July 2008, British Columbia introduced child safety seat legislation that aimed to reduce the number of children killed or injured in MVCs. This legislation upgraded previous child seat legislation (introduced in 1985 (...) ) and affected children zero to three and those four to eight years of age. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effectiveness of this legislation.Deidentified police reports for all MVCs involving zero- to 14-year-olds (2000 to 2012) were used to compare injury rates, booster seat use, and seating position among children before and after booster seat laws. An interrupted time series design was used to estimate the effect of the new law on injuries among children zero to three and four

2016 Paediatrics & child health

5. Randomized Control Trial of Booster Seat Education Material to Increase Perceived Benefit Among Parents

Old in Canada. Actual Study Start Date : December 10, 2018 Actual Primary Completion Date : December 28, 2018 Actual Study Completion Date : December 28, 2018 Arms and Interventions Go to Arm Intervention/treatment Active Comparator: Current material Participants in this arm will be shown the online Transport Canada Material that is currently available at: https://www.tc.gc.ca/en/services/road/child-car-seat-safety/installing-using-child-car-seat-booster-seat-seat-belt/stage-3-booster-seats.html (...) Randomized Control Trial of Booster Seat Education Material to Increase Perceived Benefit Among Parents Randomized Control Trial of Booster Seat Education Material to Increase Perceived Benefit Among Parents - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100

2018 Clinical Trials

6. Video-Based Social Learning or Didactics for Car Seat Education

-behavior change. The social learning theory hypothesizes that people learn and change their behavior by observation and modeling. The video used in the social learning method shows parents as role models methodically teaching proper car seat installation in a vehicle. Traditionally, child passenger safety education classes are didactic in design, relying on lecture formats and live demonstrations. The didactic method includes verbal instructions from a child passenger safety technician about car seat (...) participant will install a car seat in their vehicle prior to, and immediately following, the intervention. A child passenger safety technician observing the installation and blinded to the intervention, will use this measure to evaluate the 5 areas of installation: direction, location, mechanism (seatbelt or lower anchors), harness position, and tether use. Participants will only be evaluated on installation demonstration areas relevant to their vehicle and car seat. Each item is scored correct

2016 Clinical Trials

7. Child Car Safety: A Parental Survey at a Tertiary Care Emergency Treatment Center in Greece. (Abstract)

on a daily basis. Forward-facing restraint seats were most popular, with 53.9% total use even in children younger than 2 years or older than 4 years, whereas booster seats (9.4%) and rear-facing restraint seats (18.2%) were inappropriately disfavored. Children younger than 4 years, male drivers, and drivers who had received information on CCS had higher odds of using CRS. The proportion of those had never been provided any CCS education was 38.5%.Child restraint systems use was inappropriately low under (...) routine conditions and declined even further under emergency circumstances. Most children younger than 2 years and older than 4 years traveled inappropriately restrained in a forward-facing restraint seat. Parents should be more intensively educated on child car safety seat and the proper CRS use.

2018 Pediatric Emergency Care

8. Safety in Seconds 2.0: An App to Increase Car Seat Use

seat use at 6 months [ Time Frame: 6 months ] Self-reported measures include the type of car seat used (rear-facing car seat, forward-facing car seat, booster seat, or seat belt), the location in car where it is used (front seat or backseat), frequency of use (some of the time or all of the time) and having the seat inspected by a car seat technician. Secondary Outcome Measures : Change from baseline self-reported smoke alarm use at 6 months [ Time Frame: 6 months ] Self-reported measures include (...) Safety in Seconds 2.0: An App to Increase Car Seat Use Safety in Seconds 2.0: An App to Increase Car Seat Use - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. Safety in Seconds 2.0: An App to Increase Car

2015 Clinical Trials

9. Promoting booster seat use for young children: A school-based intervention pilot study Full Text available with Trip Pro

Promoting booster seat use for young children: A school-based intervention pilot study Misuse and/or lack of booster seat use are often associated with high rates of injury and death among school-aged children. This pilot study examined the efficacy and the potential effectiveness of a booster seat intervention in the classroom.Two elementary schools participated (randomly assigned as one intervention school and one control school). At the intervention school, a certified car seat specialist (...) and a police officer held an interactive booster seat session. The height and age for each child were recorded. Children received a certificate indicating whether they met the requirements for booster seat use and a postcard with car seat restraint specifications. Children in the control school received a brochure on car seat safety. Pre- and post-intervention self-reports were collected and booster seat use was observed.Observational findings showed a decline in booster seat use at the control school

2017 Paediatrics & child health Controlled trial quality: uncertain

10. Booster Seat Effectiveness Among Older Children: Evidence From Washington State. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Booster Seat Effectiveness Among Older Children: Evidence From Washington State. The American Academy of Pediatrics has recommended that children as old as 12 years use a booster seat when riding in motor vehicles, yet little is known about booster seat effectiveness when used by older children. This study estimated the association between booster use and injuries among children aged 8-12 years who were involved in motor vehicle crashes.Researchers analyzed data on all motor vehicle crashes (...) ). In models adjusted for potential confounders, booster use was associated with a 19% reduction in the odds of any injury relative to riding in a seat belt alone (OR=0.814, 95% CI=0.749, 0.884). The risk of experiencing an incapacitating/fatal injury was not associated with booster use.Children aged 8-12 years involved in a motor vehicle crash are less likely to be injured if in a booster than if restrained by a seat belt alone. Because only 10% of U.S. children aged 8-12 years use booster seats, policies

2017 American journal of preventive medicine

11. Booster Car Seat

Booster Car Seat Booster Car Seat Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Booster Car Seat Booster Car Seat Aka: Booster Car (...) Seat , Booster Seat From Related Chapters II. Indication Child age 4-8 years old or <57 inches tall See for guidelines III. Types High-back Booster Seat (includes harness system) Used for child over 20-30 pounds (over age 1 year) Child 40 pounds or less: Harness used Child over 40 pounds Harness removed from seat Seat raises child to use vehicle Clip at top of seat positions belt belt crosses mid-clavicle and mid-chest fits tightly over upper thighs High-back Booster Seat (without harness system

2015 FP Notebook

12. Choose the Road to Zero Motor Vehicle Crash Deaths

and more than 2 million people are injured each year in the US from motor vehicle crashes. The major risk factors for crash deaths in the US are: Not using seat belts, car seats, and booster seats, which contributed to over 9,500 crash deaths; Drunk driving, which contributed to more than 10,000 crash deaths; and Speeding, which contributed to more than 9,500 crash deaths. In Sweden, in 1997 a new idea opened the door to a new way of thinking: . This idea that no one should die or suffer serious injury (...) ) in Cambodia, and to help create and evaluate plans and tools for the School Area Road Safety Assessments and Improvements project in Africa. Mentorship: Providing annual mini-grants and technical assistance to 3-5 (FETP) residents working on road traffic injury projects. Training: Offering training on road traffic injury surveillance. Reducing motor vehicle crash deaths was one of the great public health achievements of the 20th century for the US; however, in 2015 more than 35,000 people were killed

2016 CDC Our Global Voices

13. Built-In Car Seats

-In Car Seats , Integrated Child Seat From Related Chapters II. Indication Over 1 year old and over 20 pounds III. Description Available on some GM, Ford, Chrysler and Volvo Typically uses 5 point harness Converts to booster in many cases IV. Precautions Most versions lack head support for sleeping child Some new cars will include reclining design Images: Related links to external sites (from Bing) These images are a random sampling from a Bing search on the term "Built-In Car Seats." Click (...) Built-In Car Seats Built-In Car Seats Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Built-In Car Seats Built-In Car Seats Aka: Built

2015 FP Notebook

14. Challenges in the Accurate Surveillance of Booster Seat and Bicycle Helmet Usage by Children: Lessons from the Field Full Text available with Trip Pro

Challenges in the Accurate Surveillance of Booster Seat and Bicycle Helmet Usage by Children: Lessons from the Field Motor vehicle collisions and bicycle collisions and falls are a leading cause of death by preventable injury for children. In order to design, implement and evaluate campaigns and programs aimed at improving child safety, accurate surveillance is needed. This paper examined the challenges that confront efforts to collect surveillance data relevant to child traffic safety

2016 International journal of environmental research and public health

15. What we know about kids and car seats

, infants and young children are required to use car seats in all 50 states. And 48 states require booster seats for older children. ( lists specific laws for each state.) Even though fewer children are dying in car accidents than ever before, So safety experts continue to learn more about how children respond in car crashes, and update the guidelines about how to keep kids safe. The latest recommendation — — recommends that children sit in rear-facing seats for as long as possible, at least until age 2 (...) . The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration children remain rear-facing as long as they fit the height and weight limitations for their seat. These recommendations are based on a growing body of evidence that finds the neck muscles of young children are not strong enough to protect their spine and spinal cords in a frontal crash. As a result, the force of the crash snaps the child’s head forward, which can lead to broken neck bones and spinal cord injuries. over 15 years found that rear-facing car

2015 Evidence Based Living blog

16. Effectiveness of booster seats compared with no restraint or seat belt alone for crash injury prevention. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Effectiveness of booster seats compared with no restraint or seat belt alone for crash injury prevention. The objective was to evaluate the effectiveness of belt-positioning booster seats, compared with no restraint use and with seat belt use only, during motor vehicle crashes among U.S. children.This was a retrospective matched cohort study with data from the 1998 through 2009 National Automotive Sampling System (NASS) Crashworthiness Data System (CDS). The study sample consisted of children (...) aged 0 to 10 years who were not seated in the front seat of the vehicle. We used Cox proportional hazards models to estimate the risk of overall, fatal, and regional body injury.Children using seat belts in belt-positioning booster seats experienced less overall injury (Injury Severity Score [ISS] > 0, adjusted risk ratio [RR] = 0.73, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.55 to 0.96; Abbreviated Injury Scale [AIS] score of 2 or higher, adjusted RR = 0.30, 95% CI = 0.16 to 0.58; ISS > 8, adjusted RR

2013 Academic Emergency Medicine

17. Numerical Low-Back Booster Analysis on a 6-Year-Old Infant during a Frontal Crash Test Full Text available with Trip Pro

Numerical Low-Back Booster Analysis on a 6-Year-Old Infant during a Frontal Crash Test This work studies descriptively the Head Injury Criterion (HIC) and Chest Severity Index (CSI), with a finite element model of the Hybrid III dummy type, for six-year-old subjects in a frontal vehicular collision, using the low-back booster (LBB) passive safety system. The vehicle seats and the passive safety systems were modelled in CAD (computer aided design) software. Then, the elements were analysed (...) by the finite element method (FEM) in LS-DYNA® software. The boundary conditions were established for each study, according to the regulations established by the Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard (FMVSS), following the FMVSS 213 standard. The numerical simulations were performed during an interval of 120 ms and recording results every 1 ms. In order to analyse the efficiency of the system, the restraint performance of the LBB system is compared with the restraint configuration of the vehicle safety belt

2018 Applied bionics and biomechanics

18. Kinematics of child volunteers and child anthropomorphic test devices during emergency braking events in real car environment. Full Text available with Trip Pro

) and HIII 10-year-old were restrained on booster cushions or restrained by 3-point belts directly on the car seat. Vehicle data were collected and synchronized with video data. Forward trajectories for the forehead and external auditory canal (ear) were determined as well as head rotation and shoulder belt force.A total of 40 trials were analyzed. Child volunteers had greater maximum forward displacement of the head and greater head rotation compared to the ATDs. The average maximum displacement (...) (HIII) 3-year-old, 6-year-old, and 10-year-old ATDs restrained on the right rear seat of a modern passenger vehicle. The children were exposed to one braking event in each of the 2 restraint systems and the ATDs were exposed to 2 braking events in each restraint system. All events had a deceleration of 1.0 g. Short children (stature 107-123 cm) and the Q3, HIII 3-year-old, and 6-year-old were restrained on booster cushions as well as high-back booster seats. Tall children (stature 135-150 cm

2013 Traffic injury prevention Controlled trial quality: uncertain

19. Carpooling and booster seats: a national survey of parents. Full Text available with Trip Pro

and carpooling.Of 1612 parents responding to the full survey (response rate = 71%), 706 had a 4- to 8-year-old child and 681 met inclusion rules. Most parents (76%) reported their child used a safety seat when riding in the family car. Of children reported to use seat belts, 74% did so in accordance with their state law. Parent report of child safety seat use was associated with younger child age and with the presence of state booster seat laws. Sixty-four percent of parents carpool. Among parents who carpool (...) Carpooling and booster seats: a national survey of parents. Booster seat use among school-aged children has been consistently lower than national goals. In this study, we sought to explore associations between parental experiences with booster seats and carpooling.We conducted a cross-sectional Web-based survey of a nationally representative panel of US parents in January 2010. As part of a larger survey, parents of 4- to 8-year-old children responded to 12 questions related to booster seats

2012 Pediatrics

20. Booster Seat Laws and Fatalities in Children 4 to 7 Years of Age. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Booster Seat Laws and Fatalities in Children 4 to 7 Years of Age. To determine whether state booster seat laws were associated with decreased fatality rates in children 4 to 7 years of age in the United States.Retrospective, longitudinal analysis of all motor vehicle occupant crashes involving children 4 to 7 years of age identified in the Fatality Analysis Reporting System from January 1999 through December 2009. The main outcome measure was fatality rates of motor vehicle occupants aged 4 (...) to 7 years. Because most booster laws exclude children 6 to 7 years of age, we performed separate analyses for children 4 to 5, 6, and 7 years of age.When controlling for other motor vehicle legislation, temporal and economic factors, states with booster seat laws had a lower risk of fatalities in 4- to 5-year-olds than states without booster seat laws (adjusted incidence rate ratio 0.89; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.81-0.99). States with booster seat laws that included 6-year-olds had

2012 Pediatrics

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