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Blunt Neck Trauma

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101. Denver Screening Criteria for Blunt Cerebrovascular Injury

Denver Screening Criteria for Blunt Cerebrovascular Injury Denver Screening Criteria for Blunt Cerebrovascular Injury Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure (...) Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Denver Screening Criteria for Blunt Cerebrovascular Injury Denver Screening Criteria for Blunt Cerebrovascular Injury Aka: Denver Screening Criteria for Blunt Cerebrovascular Injury , Denver Criteria for BCVI II. Indications Determine need for CT Angiogram of III. Criteria: Signs and symptoms of Blunt Cerebrovascular Injury Arterial Cervical Expanding neck hematoma Focal neurologic deficits that do not correlate with findings Cerbrovascular accident on CT Imaging

2018 FP Notebook

102. Blunt Dissection

Blunt Dissection Blunt Dissection Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Blunt Dissection Blunt Dissection Aka: Blunt (...) Dissection II. Indication III. Advantages over other surgical techniques (e.g. ED&C) Does not disturb normal tissue IV. Efficacy Cure rate in s approaches 90% V. Equipment Blunt Dissector or Schamberg acne expressor VI. Technique Administer anesthesia Outline edge of lesion Insert blunt tipped scissors between wart and skin Move tip circumferentially around wart Creates plane of dissection (separate wart from skin) Insert blunt dissector into cleavage plane Use short strokes to separate wart from skin

2018 FP Notebook

103. Right Bundle Branch Block after Blunt Trauma: A Tragic Case.

Right Bundle Branch Block after Blunt Trauma: A Tragic Case. Dr. Smith's ECG Blog: A Child with Blunt Trauma Sunday, July 22, 2012 A 6 yo girl had significant trauma from an MVC, with head injury (initial GCS 10, but no intracranial bleeding) and mild orthopedic injuries. She was intubated. A FAST exam was normal (no pericardial or peritoneal fluid). As part of her workup, this ECG was recorded: What do you think? Interpretation: There is sinus tachycardia, with right bundle branch block (RBBB (...) of the head, neck, chest, abdomen and pelvis showed no other unanticipated injuries and she was admitted to the ICU. Blunt cardiac injury my result in : 1) Acute myocardial rupture with tamponade 2) Valve rupture (tricuspid, aortic, mitral) 3) Coronary thrombosis or dissection (and thus Acute MI) from direct coronary blunt injury 4) Dysrhythmias of all kinds. 5) Myocardial contusion (edema and hemorrhage in the myocardium) which may result in dysrhythmias, blocks (especially RBBB as here), and poor

2012 Dr Smith's ECG Blog

104. Rapid Administration of Blood by HEMS in Trauma

Rapid Administration of Blood by HEMS in Trauma Rapid Administration of Blood by HEMS in Trauma - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. Rapid Administration of Blood by HEMS in Trauma (RABBIT (...) Collaborator: University Hospital Hradec Kralove Information provided by (Responsible Party): Anatolij Truhlar, MD, PhD, FERC, Zdravotnicka Zachranna Sluzba Kralovehradeckeho Kraje Study Details Study Description Go to Brief Summary: Trauma is a leading cause of death among people younger than 44 years. Five million people worldwide die from trauma annually. Uncontrolled haemorrhage causing traumatic-haemorrhagic shock (THS) is the leading cause of potentially preventable deaths from severe trauma

2018 Clinical Trials

105. Long-term outcomes after pediatric peripheral revascularization secondary to trauma at an urban level I center. (Abstract)

. Our study population included only patients who received an arterial revascularization, which was performed in 23 of the 36 consultations (1.6% of total traumas; median age, 11 years). These injuries were localized to the upper extremity in 60.9% (n = 14), lower extremity in 30.4% (n = 7), and neck in 8.7% (n = 2). The mean Injury Severity Score in the revascularized cohort was 14.0 (±7.6). Bone fractures were associated with 39.1% of the vascular injuries (90% of blunt injuries). Restoration (...) Long-term outcomes after pediatric peripheral revascularization secondary to trauma at an urban level I center. The purpose of this investigation was to determine our limb-related contemporary pediatric revascularization perioperative and follow-up outcomes after major blunt and penetrating trauma.A retrospective review was performed of a prospectively maintained pediatric trauma database spanning January 2010 to December 2017 to capture all level I trauma activations that resulted

2018 Journal of Vascular Surgery

106. Pediatric Major Vascular Injuries: A 16-Year Institutional Experience From a Combined Adult and Pediatric Trauma Center. (Abstract)

pediatric (<18 years old) trauma patients who presented with a vascular injury. A total of 177 patients were identified, with 60 (34%) having an MVI, defined as injury in the neck, torso, or proximal extremity. Patients were then further analyzed based on location of injury, mechanism, age, and race. P ≤ 0.05 was deemed significant.Of the 60 patients with MVI, the mean age was 14.3 years (range, 4-17 years). Mean intensive care unit length of stay (LOS) was 5.4 days, and mean hospital LOS was 12.5 days (...) . Blunt mechanism was more common in patients 14 years or younger; penetrating trauma was more common amongst patients older than 14 years. Overall, blunt injuries had a longer intensive care unit LOS compared with penetrating trauma (7.8 vs 3.1 days; P = 0.016). A total of 33% (n = 20) of MVIs occurred in the torso, with 50% (n = 10) of these from blunt trauma. Location of injury did correlate with mortality; 45% (n = 9) of torso MVIs resulted in death (penetrating n = 7, blunt n = 2). Overall

2018 Pediatric Emergency Care

107. Management of Laryngotracheal Trauma: A Five-Year Single Institution Experience Full Text available with Trip Pro

2016. Patients who presented with a breach in the laryngotracheal framework were included, while those who had penetrating neck injuries superficial to strap muscles/platysma, burn injuries, caustic ingestion, or endotracheal injuries were excluded from the study.Of 253 patients with neck injury, 26 (23 adults, three children; 21 males, five females; age range, 5-60 years) presented with a breach in the laryngotracheal framework (15 blunt neck-trauma patients and 11 penetrating neck-trauma patients (...) ). The most common cause of neck injury was road traffic accidents, seen in 12 patients (46.2%). Computed tomography (CT) was performed in all blunt trauma cases and in four patients with penetrating trauma. All penetrating trauma patients underwent neck exploration. Twelve blunt trauma patients (46.1%) were managed conservatively, while three (11.5%) required surgical intervention. The most common neck exploration finding noted in patients with a penetrating injury was fracture of the thyroid cartilage

2018 Iranian journal of otorhinolaryngology

108. The Management of Urological Trauma Associated with Pelvic Fractures

The Management of Urological Trauma Associated with Pelvic Fractures BOAST 14: THE MANAGEMENT OF UROLOGICAL TRAUMA ASSOCIATED WITH PELVIC FRACTURES Background and Justification: Urological trauma is rare and the incidence of severe urethral trauma is 1/million population/year. The majority of cases are due to blunt high-energy trauma with associated multi-system injuries and 80% of these cases are associated with pelvic fractures. Urological injuries are potentially fatal and can result (...) supra-regional specialist in urology. 17. The indications for primary (within 48 hours) urethral repair are: associated ano-rectal injury, perineal degloving, bladder neck injury, massive bladder displacement and penetrating trauma to the anterior urethra. 18. The recommended definitive treatment for urethral rupture in adult males is delayed repair at 3 months post injury. Each MTC should have a clear referral pathway to a recognised centre for reconstructive urethral surgery with a named

2016 British Association of Urological Surgeons

109. Trauma in pregnancy

Table 12. Placental abruption 17 Table 13. Uterine rupture 18 Table 14. Amniotic fluid embolism 18 Table 15. Disseminated intravascular coagulopathy 19 Table 16. Musculoskeletal injury 19 Table 17. Minor trauma 20 Queensland Clinical Guideline: Trauma in pregnancy Refer to online version, destroy printed copies after use Page 7 of 31 1 Introduction Trauma affects up to 8% of all pregnancies and is a common cause of non-obstetric maternal morbidity and mortality. 4 Both blunt and penetrating (gunshot (...) or knife related) trauma is encountered in Australia but blunt trauma is the most common. Direct fetal injuries occur in less than 1% of cases of severe blunt abdominal trauma. 5 Even minor injuries in the pregnant woman can be associated with placental abruption, preterm labour, massive feto-maternal haemorrhage, uterine rupture and fetal loss. 4,5 The evidence for care provision is limited with the majority of studies being retrospective and reported outcomes varying widely. 6 1.1 Principles of care

2014 Queensland Health

110. Trauma in pregnancy

Table 12. Placental abruption 17 Table 13. Uterine rupture 18 Table 14. Amniotic fluid embolism 18 Table 15. Disseminated intravascular coagulopathy 19 Table 16. Musculoskeletal injury 19 Table 17. Minor trauma 20 Queensland Clinical Guideline: Trauma in pregnancy Refer to online version, destroy printed copies after use Page 7 of 31 1 Introduction Trauma affects up to 8% of all pregnancies and is a common cause of non-obstetric maternal morbidity and mortality. 4 Both blunt and penetrating (gunshot (...) or knife related) trauma is encountered in Australia but blunt trauma is the most common. Direct fetal injuries occur in less than 1% of cases of severe blunt abdominal trauma. 5 Even minor injuries in the pregnant woman can be associated with placental abruption, preterm labour, massive feto-maternal haemorrhage, uterine rupture and fetal loss. 4,5 The evidence for care provision is limited with the majority of studies being retrospective and reported outcomes varying widely. 6 1.1 Principles of care

2014 Clinical Practice Guidelines Portal

111. Pediatric Blunt Abdominal Trauma

Pediatric Blunt Abdominal Trauma Pediatric Blunt Abdominal Trauma Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Pediatric Blunt (...) Abdominal Trauma Pediatric Blunt Abdominal Trauma Aka: Pediatric Blunt Abdominal Trauma , Blunt Abdominal Injury in Children , Pediatric Abdominal Trauma From Related Chapters II. Precautions See Children hide hemodynamic instability from Children compensate even with until they precipitously, hemodynamically collapse Children are higher risk for serious injury following blunt Compact torso with large organ to body mass ratios (concentrated in a tight ) Large organs not fully protected by rib margin

2015 FP Notebook

112. Pediatric Blunt Abdominal Trauma Decision Rule

Pediatric Blunt Abdominal Trauma Decision Rule Pediatric Blunt Abdominal Trauma Decision Rule Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer (...) Administration 4 Pediatric Blunt Abdominal Trauma Decision Rule Pediatric Blunt Abdominal Trauma Decision Rule Aka: Pediatric Blunt Abdominal Trauma Decision Rule , Blunt Abdominal Trauma Decision Rule for Children II. Indications III. Criteria Abdominal wall signs or <14 Abdominal tenderness on exam Thoracic wall Complains of Absent or decreased breath sounds IV. Interpretation All 7 criteria negative Very reassuring and unlikely to have intra- requiring intervention not indicated unless for other criteria

2015 FP Notebook

113. Blunt Eye Trauma

Blunt Eye Trauma Blunt Eye Trauma Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Blunt Eye Trauma Blunt Eye Trauma Aka: Blunt Eye (...) Trauma From Related Chapters II. Exam Remove contacts immediately Removal difficult with swelling See III. Complications: Conditions secondary to blunt Trauma Penetrating with tic IV. Imaging: Indicated if penetrating injury suspected Orbital CT Scan (1-1.5 mm cuts, axial and coronal) or XRay (up and down gaze views) if CT not available V. Management Patients who are discharged Close interval follow-up Self-monitoring of vision and immediate return for worsening or lack of improvement VI. References

2015 FP Notebook

114. Patterns of injury and otolaryngology intervention in pediatric neck trauma. (Abstract)

=0.009). Laryngotracheal injuries were documented in 11 patients with 6 of these characterized as major injuries and 5 minor injuries.Pediatric neck trauma represents a spectrum of injuries from ecchymosis to major laryngotracheal injury. Otolaryngology involvement is not necessary in all cases; however, one must be aware of the risk of laryngotracheal injury, particularly with blunt trauma and there should be a low threshold for Otolaryngology consultation and endoscopy.Copyright © 2012 Elsevier (...) Patterns of injury and otolaryngology intervention in pediatric neck trauma. Neck trauma in the pediatric population is relatively rare with limited discussion in the literature describing the injury patterns and outcomes of all neck trauma victims. This study characterizes pediatric neck trauma both inside and outside the context of injuries requiring otolaryngology (ENT) intervention.Patients sustaining neck trauma presenting to a single tertiary care hospital between January 2001 and June

2012 International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology

115. Multidetector CT of Blunt Abdominal Trauma. (Abstract)

Multidetector CT of Blunt Abdominal Trauma. The morbidity, mortality, and economic costs resulting from trauma in general, and blunt abdominal trauma in particular, are substantial. The "panscan" (computed tomographic [CT] examination of the head, neck, chest, abdomen, and pelvis) has become an essential element in the early evaluation and decision-making algorithm for hemodynamically stable patients who sustained abdominal trauma. CT has virtually replaced diagnostic peritoneal lavage (...) technique that are currently relevant for evaluating blunt abdominal trauma and describe the most important CT signs of trauma in the various organs. Because conservative nonsurgical therapy is preferred for all but the most severe injuries affecting the solid viscera, the authors emphasize the CT findings that are indications for direct therapeutic intervention.©RSNA, 2012.

2012 Radiology

116. Management of Vertebral Artery Injuries Following Non-Penetrating Cervical Trauma Full Text available with Trip Pro

patients with suspected blunt cerebrovascular injuries (BCVI) to CTA and MRA in selected (but not all) patients. They noted that CTA identified 53% of VAI found on catheter angiography. MRA identified 47% of VAI confirmed by catheter angiography. In 2006, Eastman and colleagues prospectively compared CTA to catheter angiography as a screening tool for vascular injuries in the neck in 146 trauma patients who met the Modified Denver Screening Criteria ( ). They determined that the sensitivity (...) . That same year, Schneidereit et al evaluated 1313 blunt trauma patients. One hundred thirty-seven CTA studies were performed. The incidence of blunt vascular neck injuries in their series was 1.4%. Only 23 patients underwent angiography to confirm or refute the CTA findings. The calculated sensitivity and specificity of CTA to detect a vascular injury in this study was 65% and 50%, respectively. No attempt was made to define the accuracy of CTA to identify isolated vertebral artery injuries after trauma

2013 Congress of Neurological Surgeons

117. Prehospital Cervical Spinal Immobilization After Trauma Full Text available with Trip Pro

with potential spinal injury at the scene by trained and experienced emergency medical services personnel to determine the need for immobilization during transport is recommended. Immobilization of trauma patients who are awake, alert, and are not intoxicated; who are without neck pain or tenderness; who do not have an abnormal motor or sensory examination; and who do not have any significant associated injury that might detract from their general evaluation is not recommended. Level III A combination (...) in place since 1990. EMS Policy Number 530, as it is known, calls for spinal immobilization in the following circumstances: Spinal pain or tenderness, including any neck pain with a history of trauma Significant multiple system trauma Severe head or facial trauma Numbness or weakness in any extremity after trauma Loss of consciousness caused by trauma If mental status is altered (including drugs, alcohol, trauma) and no history is available, or the patient is found in a setting of possible trauma (eg

2013 Congress of Neurological Surgeons

118. Rupture of Cervical Esophagus From Blunt Trauma With Concomitant Fracture Dislocation of C4-C5 Vertebrae Full Text available with Trip Pro

Rupture of Cervical Esophagus From Blunt Trauma With Concomitant Fracture Dislocation of C4-C5 Vertebrae A patient is presented who had sustained a high posterior cervical esophageal laceration (secondary to an automobile accident) with concomitant fracture of the C(4) - C(5) spine. It was treated by Gulbrandson conversional method. To the author's knowledge, this represents the first recorded rupture of the cervical esophagus associated with high cord lesions as a result of blunt trauma (...) to the neck.

1979 Journal of the National Medical Association

119. Suspected Spine Trauma

or equal to 16 years. Suspected acute cervical spine blunt trauma. Clinical or imaging findings suggest arterial injury with or without positive cervical spine CT. Next imaging study. Procedure Appropriateness Category Relative Radiation Level CTA head and neck with IV contrast Usually Appropriate ??? MRA neck without and with IV contrast Usually Appropriate O Arteriography cervicocerebral May Be Appropriate ??? MRA neck without IV contrast May Be Appropriate O ACR Appropriateness Criteria ® 3 (...) and neck with IV contrast Usually Not Appropriate ??? MRA neck without and with IV contrast Usually Not Appropriate O MRA neck without IV contrast Usually Not Appropriate O MRI cervical spine without and with IV contrast Usually Not Appropriate O Radiography cervical spine Usually Not Appropriate ?? Variant 7: Age greater than or equal to 16 years. Suspected acute cervical spine blunt trauma. Clinical or imaging findings suggest ligamentous injury. Next imaging study after CT cervical spine without IV

2012 American College of Radiology

120. Endotracheal Intubation Following Trauma

adverse consequences. An assessment tool used in the current (eighth) version of advanced trauma life support is the LEMON mnemonic. [13] L: Look externally (facial trauma, large incisors, beard or moustache, large tongue); E: Evaluate the 3-3-2 rule (incisor distance < 3 fingers, hyoid mental distance < 3 fingers, thyroid to mouth < 2 fingers); M: Mallampati score; O: Obstruction (presence of any condition that could cause obstruction); and N: Neck mobility (all patients with blunt trauma require (...) and (2) delineate the most appropriate procedure for patients undergoing ETI. The basis for these guidelines was an evidence-based review of patients who had sustained blunt trauma, penetrating trauma, or heat-related injury and had developed respiratory system insufficiency or required ETI in the immediate period after injury (first 2 hours after injury). The previous committee reviewed literature from 1970 to 2001 and formulated the guidelines published in 2003. [ ] In creating the updated

2012 Eastern Association for the Surgery of Trauma

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