How to Trip Rapid Review

Step 1: Select articles relevant to your search (remember the system is only optimised for single intervention studies)

Step 2: press

Step 3: review the result, and maybe amend the or if you know better! If we're unsure of the overall sentiment of the trial we will display the conclusion under the article title. We then require you to tell us what the correct sentiment is.

1,173 results for

Blunt Neck Trauma

by
...
Latest & greatest
Alerts

Export results

Use check boxes to select individual results below

SmartSearch available

Trip's SmartSearch engine has discovered connected searches & results. Click to show

181. Urethra, Trauma

. If visualization of the bladder neck is poor, flexible cystoscopy can be used through the suprapubic site to gain better visualization. MRI can also be used to further characterize the stricture and to estimate the length of the defect, the degree of prostatic misalignment, and the density of scar tissue [ , , ] For most patients with widespread acute trauma, computed tomography (CT) scanning is performed as an initial diagnostic tool. [ , ] However, these scans are not traditionally used for diagnosing (...) of contrast material is present. Urethra, trauma. Retrograde urethrogram demonstrates a less common type II urethral disruption. Extravasation of contrast material (solid arrow) from the posterior urethra is seen superior to an intact urogenital diaphragm (dashed arrow). Urethra, trauma. Retrograde urethrogram reveals a type III urethral tear at the urogenital diaphragm (solid arrow) and a type IV urethral disruption at the bladder neck (dashed arrow). Urethra, trauma. Straddle injury. Retrograde

2014 eMedicine Radiology

182. Vascular and Solid Organ Trauma - Interventional Radiology

in the upper pole (arrow) and 1 in the lateral aspect of the mid spleen (arrow; courtesy of the Society of Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology). Contrast-enhanced CT of a 65-year-old woman with a remote history of blunt abdominal trauma and severe abdominal pain. A large pseudoaneurysm is present and is associated with an infarcted segment of the liver. Many technical innovations in imaging and angiographic equipment, as well as new developments in transcatheter therapy, have paved the way (...) stent-grafts; with this approach, the risk associated with a thoracotomy may be avoided. [ , , , , , , ] Previous Next: Splenic Trauma The traditional treatment of blunt splenic trauma was surgical splenectomy; however, a trend of splenic salvage through nonoperative management of splenic injury has emerged as traumatologists have come to recognize the important role the spleen plays in preventing overwhelming sepsis by encapsulated organisms such as pneumococcus. [ , , , , , ] Nonoperative

2014 eMedicine Radiology

183. Closed Head Trauma (Overview)

, Dicocco JM, Zarzaur BL, Croce MA. Improving the screening criteria for blunt cerebrovascular injury: the appropriate role for computed tomography angiography. J Trauma . 2011 May. 70(5):1058-65. . Raji CA, Tarzwell R, Pavel D, Schneider H, Uszler M, Thornton J, et al. Clinical utility of SPECT neuroimaging in the diagnosis and treatment of traumatic brain injury: a systematic review. PLoS One . 2014. 9(3):e91088. . . Mac Donald CL, Johnson AM, Cooper D, et al. Detection of blast-related traumatic (...) injury: injection of mannitol during hyperventilation. J Neurosurg . 1990 Nov. 73(5):725-30. . Gasco J, Sendra J, Lim J, Ng I. Linear correlation between stable intracranial pressure decrease and regional cerebral oxygenation improvement following mannitol administration in severe acute head injury patients. Acta Neurochir Suppl . 2005. 95:73-7. . Chesnut RM, Gautille T, Blunt BA, Klauber MR, Marshall LF. Neurogenic hypotension in patients with severe head injuries. J Trauma . 1998 Jun. 44(6):958-63

2014 eMedicine Surgery

184. Penetrating Head Trauma (Overview)

Surg . 2009 Apr. 67(4):775-81. . Kazemi H, Hashemi-Fesharaki S, Razaghi S, et al. Intractable epilepsy and craniocerebral trauma: analysis of 163 patients with blunt and penetrating head injuries sustained in war. Injury . 2012 Dec. 43(12):2132-5. . Aarabi B. History of the management of craniocerebral wounds. Aarabi B, Kaufman HH, Dagi TF, George ED, Levy ML, eds. Missile Wounds of the Head and Neck . Park Ridge, Ill: American Association of Neurological Surgeons; 1999. Vol 1: 281-292. Aarabi B (...) Penetrating Head Trauma (Overview) Penetrating Head Trauma: Background, History of the Procedure, Problem Edition: No Results No Results Please confirm that you would like to log out of Medscape. If you log out, you will be required to enter your username and password the next time you visit. https://profreg.medscape.com/px/getpracticeprofile.do?method=getProfessionalProfile&urlCache=aHR0cHM6Ly9lbWVkaWNpbmUubWVkc2NhcGUuY29tL2FydGljbGUvMjQ3NjY0LW92ZXJ2aWV3 processing > Penetrating Head Trauma

2014 eMedicine Surgery

185. Bladder, Trauma

through the fascial planes of the pelvis. In a retrospective study of patients with bladder rupture from blunt trauma, mortality rate was 11%, mean injury severity score was 29, and mean length of hospital stay was 15 days. [ ] Most ruptures were diagnosed by CT cystography. Pelvic fracture was present in 80%, hollow viscus injury in 34.5%, colon injury in 24%, and rectal injury in 9.3%. Pelvic fracture was present in essentially all patients with extraperitoneal bladder rupture, and hollow viscus (...) not recommend this diagnostic strategy for the reasons mentioned. Because study results have also cast doubt on the consistent accuracy of this method in the evaluation of blunt trauma, its use is discouraged. Limitations of techniques Cystography generally has served to greatly decrease trauma morbidity and mortality by helping to successfully screen for bladder rupture. Little doubt exists concerning the accuracy of plain film cystography, as long as a bladder hematoma does not occlude a rift

2014 eMedicine Radiology

186. Aorta, Trauma

margins of the pseudoaneurysm are better delineated on this image than on others. Aorta, trauma. Left anterior oblique (45°) angiogram shows disruption of the innominate artery. A well-circumscribed narrow-neck pseudoaneurysm is noted along the superior margin of the aortic isthmus. The findings suggest a daughter injury immediately distal to the main outpouching. Aorta, trauma. Posteroanterior angiogram shows multiple great-vessel injuries. The image shows a cut-off of the left vertebral artery (...) /her to a level I trauma center for evaluation, diagnosis, and definitive treatment before free rupture occurs. Preferred examination Plain radiography is usually the first test to be performed. The optimal upright posteroanterior (PA) chest evaluation is often deferred for a portable examination with the patient still on the backboard. Computed tomography (CT) scanning and angiography are the prime imaging modalities in the planning of treatment for blunt trauma. The choice between CT scanning

2014 eMedicine Radiology

187. Considerations in Pediatric Trauma

children and adolescents. Use of helmets results in fewer head injuries and decreases the severity of them as well. Tragically, the home environment is the next most common scene of pediatric injury. Approximately 35% of significant injuries occur as the result of accidents in the very environment that should be the most sheltering and nurturing to children. Most pediatric trauma occurs as a result of blunt trauma, with penetrating injury accounting for 10-20% of all pediatric trauma admissions at most (...) centers. [ ] Gunshot wounds are responsible for most penetrating injuries and carry a significantly higher mortality compared with blunt mechanism injuries. A rising incidence of pediatric penetrating trauma, particularly penetrating thoracic trauma, has occurred in recent years. Unfortunately, the proliferation of handguns and increased proclivity to urban violence in our society has increased the frequency of penetrating injury in children aged 13-18 years. Regardless of the classification, the 2

2014 eMedicine Surgery

188. Lumbar Spine, Trauma

of the lower lumbar transverse spinous processes associated with an unstable pelvic fracture may indicate injury to the sacral plexus. Fractures of transverse processes may be associated with visceral trauma as well. Oblique views of the lumbar spine are useful in the evaluation of spondylolysis of the pars interarticularis. The so-called Scottie dog configuration may demonstrate a defect in the "neck" of the dog-shaped configuration in patients with spondylolysis. In patients who have undergone operative (...) of the lumbar spine are valuable because multisection CT scanners can generate high-resolution spinal images, even during a primary multisystemic evaluation for trauma. Because of the high incidence of associated multisystemic trauma, routine computed tomography of the abdomen, pelvis, and lumbar spine has been advocated in blunt trauma. Compared with an algorithm utilizing CT in selected cases, an algorithm with routine CT finds substantially more clinically relevant diagnoses. [ , ] Traumatic injuries

2014 eMedicine Radiology

189. Trauma Scoring Systems

regression is the most popular approach when the outcome of interest is dichotomous because of some unique advantages of multiple logistic regression. Odds is a ratio of the probability that a certain event under consideration will occur to the probability that it will not occur. As an example, out of 100 patients aged 65-74 years who sustain blunt abdominal trauma, 10 will die, while out of 50 patients aged 75-84 years, 15 will die. The probability of death in the age group of 65-74 years is 20/100=0.2 (...) (20%) and in the age group of 75-84 years is 15/50=0.3 (30%). Therefore, the odds of a patient who is between the ages of 65-74 years dying after blunt trauma is 0.2/1-0.2=0.25 (25%). In contrast, the odds of a patient who is between the ages of 75-84 years dying after blunt trauma is 0.3/1-0.3=0.4 (40%). If the probability of an event occurring is equal to the probability that it will not occur, then the odds that the event will occur is 0.5/1-0.5=1 (eg, the odds of “heads” appearing after

2014 eMedicine Surgery

190. Trauma and Pregnancy

reviewed for the years 1986-1989. Direct and indirect obstetric factors caused maternal deaths in 31.5% of 95 cases. Trauma caused maternal deaths in 46.5% of the 95 cases, and, of these traumatic death cases, 34% were due to accidents, 57% to homicide, and 9% to suicide. The following describes the percentage of traumatic maternal deaths caused by each mechanism of injury in this series. Gunshot wounds 23% Motor vehicle accidents 21% Stab wounds 14% Strangulation 14% Blunt head injury 9% Burns 7 (...) to the fetus presented by the use of dextran, steroids, and antihistamines are not well defined. Previous Next: Blunt Trauma Blunt trauma is a common denominator to many injuries during pregnancy. [ , , ] Motor vehicle accidents are a common source of blunt trauma. Crosby reviewed 441 pregnant women involved in automobile collisions. [ ] Collisions were divided into the categories of minor or severe. When minor damage occurred to the vehicle, only 3 of 233 victims experienced injury and no placental

2014 eMedicine Surgery

191. Critical Care Considerations in Trauma

that negative CT finding for an asymptomatic patient after blunt abdominal trauma is sufficient to exclude major intra-abdominal injury. [ , ] Limbs Inspect, palpate, and move the limbs to determine their anatomic and functional integrity. Pay attention to the adequacy of the peripheral circulation and integrity of the nerve supply. Arterial insufficiency in patients with a displaced fracture or dislocation requires immediate treatment, generally fracture reduction and/or joint relocation. Pulse inequality (...) to each side to assess the dependent part of the supine trauma patient. Care must be taken to avoid secondary injury from an as-yet undiagnosed unstable fracture. This examination concentrates on the back of the head, neck, back, and buttocks, and it includes a rectal examination. The log roll also provides a convenient time to remove the long immobilization board. The board has not been shown to prevent injury in the presence of an unstable vertebral fracture, but it is highly correlated

2014 eMedicine Surgery

192. Ureteral Trauma (Follow-up)

Ureteral Trauma (Follow-up) Ureteral Trauma Treatment & Management: Surgical Therapy, Follow-up, Complications Edition: No Results No Results Please confirm that you would like to log out of Medscape. If you log out, you will be required to enter your username and password the next time you visit. https://profreg.medscape.com/px/getpracticeprofile.do?method=getProfessionalProfile&urlCache=aHR0cHM6Ly9lbWVkaWNpbmUubWVkc2NhcGUuY29tL2FydGljbGUvNDQwOTMzLXRyZWF0bWVudA== processing > Ureteral Trauma (...) Treatment & Management Updated: Feb 11, 2017 Author: Richard A Santucci, MD, FACS; Chief Editor: Bradley Fields Schwartz, DO, FACS Share Email Print Feedback Close Sections Sections Ureteral Trauma Treatment Surgical Therapy Management of ureteral injuries is dictated by the location, type, extent, timing of presentation, medical history, overall status of the patient, including associated injuries, and prognosis. [ ] The American Urologic Association has released guidelines on imaging and management

2014 eMedicine.com

193. Abdominal Trauma, Penetrating (Treatment)

or associated blunt injury, cervical collars are rarely necessary and may hinder resuscitation. Breathing Tube thoracostomy or needle decompression should be undertaken immediately for patients with obvious pneumothorax. A patient who is otherwise stable, should have a chest radiograph performed in the trauma room. An upright positioned radiograph during expiration may provide the best evidence of pneumothorax. Ultrasonography for pneumothorax (as part of the Extended Focused Assessment With Sonography (...) evaluation for neurologic deficits should be conducted. All patients with penetrating trauma should be fully undressed. Complete exposure and head-to-toe visualization of the patient is mandatory in a patient with penetrating abdominal trauma. This includes the buttocks, posterior part of the legs, scalp, posterior part of the neck, and perineum. There is little to be gained by practicing spinal immobilization unless spinal injury is obvious. Further intervention Depending on the initial assessment

2014 eMedicine Emergency Medicine

194. Trauma, Peripheral Vascular Injuries (Overview)

Vascular Injuries Updated: Oct 08, 2015 Author: Niels K Rathlev, MD, FACEP; Chief Editor: Trevor John Mills, MD, MPH Share Email Print Feedback Close Sections Sections Peripheral Vascular Injuries Overview Background Peripheral vascular injuries may result from penetrating or blunt trauma to the extremities. If not recognized and treated rapidly, injuries to major arteries, veins, and nerves may have disastrous consequences resulting in the loss of life and limb. See Medscape's and for related (...) -energy gunshot wounds such as those produced by military rifles and shotguns. Explosives are a frequent cause of vascular injury in military combat. The rate of vascular injury in modern combat (ie, the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan) is 5 times greater than in the past. [ ] Blunt and penetrating trauma resulting in extremity fractures also have a high incidence of concomitant vascular injuries, even in the absence of clinical signs. The likelihood of serious vascular injury is lower in patients who

2014 eMedicine Emergency Medicine

195. Bladder Trauma (Diagnosis)

, 2019 Author: Bradley C Gill, MD, MS; Chief Editor: Bradley Fields Schwartz, DO, FACS Share Email Print Feedback Close Sections Sections Bladder Trauma Overview Practice Essentials Bladder injuries can result from blunt, penetrating, or iatrogenic trauma. [ , ] The probability of bladder injury varies according to the degree of bladder distention; a full bladder is more susceptible to injury than is an empty one. Although historically, bladder trauma was uniformly fatal, timely diagnosis (...) of intraperitoneal bladder rupture in the setting of blunt or penetrating external trauma" and that "clinicians should perform catheter drainage as treatment for patients with uncomplicated extraperitoneal bladder injuries." [ ] Nevertheless, the literature contains a handful of case reports describing intraperitoneal bladder rupture managed conservatively. Two such reports describe successful treatment of small ruptures in patients with a benign abdomen, using prolonged large-diameter urethral catheter drainage

2014 eMedicine.com

196. Penetrating Head Trauma (Treatment)

== processing > Penetrating Head Trauma Treatment & Management Updated: Oct 29, 2015 Author: Federico C Vinas, MD; Chief Editor: Brian H Kopell, MD Share Email Print Feedback Close Sections Sections Penetrating Head Trauma Treatment Medical Therapy Patients with severe penetrating injuries should receive resuscitation according to the Advanced Trauma Life Support guidelines. Specific indications for endotracheal intubation include inability to maintain adequate ventilation, impending airway loss from neck (...) , Biassou N, et al. Semi-automated trajectory analysis of deep ballistic penetrating brain injury. Mil Med . 2013 Mar. 178(3):338-45. . Stuehmer C, Blum KS, Kokemueller H, et al. Influence of different types of guns, projectiles, and propellants on patterns of injury to the viscerocranium. J Oral Maxillofac Surg . 2009 Apr. 67(4):775-81. . Kazemi H, Hashemi-Fesharaki S, Razaghi S, et al. Intractable epilepsy and craniocerebral trauma: analysis of 163 patients with blunt and penetrating head injuries

2014 eMedicine Surgery

197. Pancreatic Trauma (Treatment)

> Pancreatic Trauma Treatment & Management Updated: Jan 27, 2015 Author: H Scott Bjerke, MD, FACS; Chief Editor: John Geibel, MD, DSc, MSc, AGAF Share Email Print Feedback Close Sections Sections Pancreatic Trauma Treatment Medical Therapy In the early 1900s, observation of pancreatic injury was associated with a 100% mortality rate. However, more recently, the medical literature supports observation in select blunt injuries to the pancreas. The standard of care in penetrating injuries is still operative (...) exploration. Patients who have experienced blunt trauma and who have stable hemodynamics and CT scans showing no evidence of pancreatic parenchymal fracture, parenchymal hematoma, parenchymal edema, fluid in the lesser sac, or retroperitoneal hematoma may be observed but should not be considered to be cleared for pancreatic injury for at least 72 hours. Any patient with blunt trauma who continues to have abdominal pain or who develops symptoms of pancreatic injury should be thoroughly reassessed

2014 eMedicine Surgery

198. Head Trauma (Treatment)

Head Trauma (Treatment) Head Trauma Treatment & Management: Medical Therapy, Complications, Outcome and Prognosis Edition: No Results No Results Please confirm that you would like to log out of Medscape. If you log out, you will be required to enter your username and password the next time you visit. https://profreg.medscape.com/px/getpracticeprofile.do?method=getProfessionalProfile&urlCache=aHR0cHM6Ly9lbWVkaWNpbmUubWVkc2NhcGUuY29tL2FydGljbGUvNDMzODU1LXRyZWF0bWVudA== processing > Head Trauma (...) Treatment & Management Updated: Jan 09, 2015 Author: Craig R Ainsworth, MD; Chief Editor: John Geibel, MD, DSc, MSc, AGAF Share Email Print Feedback Close Sections Sections Head Trauma Treatment Medical Therapy The treatment of head injury may be divided into the treatment of and the treatment of . While significant overlap exists between the treatments of these 2 types of injury, some important differences are discussed. Closed head injury treatment is divided further into the treatment of mild

2014 eMedicine Surgery

199. Abdominal Trauma, Penetrating (Treatment)

or associated blunt injury, cervical collars are rarely necessary and may hinder resuscitation. Breathing Tube thoracostomy or needle decompression should be undertaken immediately for patients with obvious pneumothorax. A patient who is otherwise stable, should have a chest radiograph performed in the trauma room. An upright positioned radiograph during expiration may provide the best evidence of pneumothorax. Ultrasonography for pneumothorax (as part of the Extended Focused Assessment With Sonography (...) evaluation for neurologic deficits should be conducted. All patients with penetrating trauma should be fully undressed. Complete exposure and head-to-toe visualization of the patient is mandatory in a patient with penetrating abdominal trauma. This includes the buttocks, posterior part of the legs, scalp, posterior part of the neck, and perineum. There is little to be gained by practicing spinal immobilization unless spinal injury is obvious. Further intervention Depending on the initial assessment

2014 eMedicine Surgery

200. Thoracic Trauma (Follow-up)

the following: Blunt trauma Barometric trauma (eg, Boerhaave syndrome, air-pressure injury) Penetrating trauma Caustic injury Foreign body Patients with perforations of the cervical esophagus can present with neck pain, cervical dysphagia, dysphonia, or bloody regurgitation. Intrathoracic perforations can rapidly contaminate the mediastinum, leading to chest pain, tachycardia, tachypnea, fever, and leukocytosis. Expeditious diagnosis of esophageal injury is important because early diagnosis significantly (...) . Analysis of the National Pediatric Trauma Registry reveals that blunt trauma accounts for approximately 85% of chest injuries serious enough to warrant treatment. [ ] Almost three quarters of these chest injuries were caused by motor vehicle accidents, with the remainder attributable to motorcycle-related trauma, falls, and bicycle accidents. Penetrating injuries increase in war-torn countries. Penetrating trauma constitutes 15% of chest injuries in children, with most caused by gunshots, knife wounds

2014 eMedicine Pediatrics

To help you find the content you need quickly, you can filter your results via the categories on the right-hand side >>>>