How to Trip Rapid Review

Step 1: Select articles relevant to your search (remember the system is only optimised for single intervention studies)

Step 2: press

Step 3: review the result, and maybe amend the or if you know better! If we're unsure of the overall sentiment of the trial we will display the conclusion under the article title. We then require you to tell us what the correct sentiment is.

144 results for

Beau Lines

by
...
Latest & greatest
Alerts

Export results

Use check boxes to select individual results below

SmartSearch available

Trip's SmartSearch engine has discovered connected searches & results. Click to show

81. Acute Myelogenous Leukemia (Treatment)

(or no initial complete response) who had no response to first-salvage therapy and received a second or subsequent salvage therapy had a response rate of 0%. These data underscore the need to develop new treatment options for these patients. Response to third-line therapy is even worse. Giles et al studied 594 patients with AML undergoing second salvage therapy from 1980 to 2004. [ ] The patient median age was 50 years. Salvage therapy included allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT), standard-dose (...) cell count every 1–3 months for 2 years, then every 3–6 months up to 5 years. The NCCN recommends a bone marrow aspirate and biopsy only if a peripheral smear is abnormal or cytopenias develop. [ ] Previous References Arber DA, Orazi A, Hasserjian R, Thiele J, Borowitz MJ, Le Beau MM, et al. The 2016 revision to the World Health Organization classification of myeloid neoplasms and acute leukemia. Blood . 2016 May 19. 127 (20):2391-405. . . Smith MT, Skibola CF, Allan JM, Morgan GJ. Causal models

2014 eMedicine.com

82. Psoriatic Arthritis (Treatment)

with psoriatic arthritis, may include the following: Beau lines Leukonychia Onycholysis Oil spots Subungual hyperkeratosis Splinter hemorrhages Spotted lunulae Transverse ridging Cracking of the free edge of the nail Uniform nail pitting Extra-articular features are observed less frequently in patients with psoriatic arthritis than in those with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) but may include the following: Synovitis affecting flexor tendon sheaths, with sparing of the extensor tendon sheath Subcutaneous nodules (...) of autoimmunity, perhaps mediated by complement activation. The inflammatory nature of the skin and joint lesions in psoriatic arthritis is demonstrated by synovial-lining cell hyperplasia and mononuclear infiltration, resembling the histopathologic changes of RA. However, synovial-lining hyperplasia is less, macrophages are fewer, and vascularity is greater in psoriatic arthritis than in RA synovium. The cytokine profile for psoriatic arthritis reflects a complex interplay between T cells and monocyte

2014 eMedicine.com

83. Psoriatic Arthritis (Treatment)

with psoriatic arthritis, may include the following: Beau lines Leukonychia Onycholysis Oil spots Subungual hyperkeratosis Splinter hemorrhages Spotted lunulae Transverse ridging Cracking of the free edge of the nail Uniform nail pitting Extra-articular features are observed less frequently in patients with psoriatic arthritis than in those with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) but may include the following: Synovitis affecting flexor tendon sheaths, with sparing of the extensor tendon sheath Subcutaneous nodules (...) of autoimmunity, perhaps mediated by complement activation. The inflammatory nature of the skin and joint lesions in psoriatic arthritis is demonstrated by synovial-lining cell hyperplasia and mononuclear infiltration, resembling the histopathologic changes of RA. However, synovial-lining hyperplasia is less, macrophages are fewer, and vascularity is greater in psoriatic arthritis than in RA synovium. The cytokine profile for psoriatic arthritis reflects a complex interplay between T cells and monocyte

2014 eMedicine.com

84. Psoriatic Arthritis (Treatment)

with psoriatic arthritis, may include the following: Beau lines Leukonychia Onycholysis Oil spots Subungual hyperkeratosis Splinter hemorrhages Spotted lunulae Transverse ridging Cracking of the free edge of the nail Uniform nail pitting Extra-articular features are observed less frequently in patients with psoriatic arthritis than in those with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) but may include the following: Synovitis affecting flexor tendon sheaths, with sparing of the extensor tendon sheath Subcutaneous nodules (...) of autoimmunity, perhaps mediated by complement activation. The inflammatory nature of the skin and joint lesions in psoriatic arthritis is demonstrated by synovial-lining cell hyperplasia and mononuclear infiltration, resembling the histopathologic changes of RA. However, synovial-lining hyperplasia is less, macrophages are fewer, and vascularity is greater in psoriatic arthritis than in RA synovium. The cytokine profile for psoriatic arthritis reflects a complex interplay between T cells and monocyte

2014 eMedicine.com

85. Psoriasis, Nails (Treatment)

or salmon patch of the nail bed This lesion is a translucent, yellow-red discoloration in the nail bed resembling a drop of oil beneath the nail plate. This patch is the most diagnostic sign of nail psoriasis. [ ] Pitting of the proximal nail matrix Pitting is a result of the loss of parakeratotic cells from the surface of the nail plate. Beau lines of the proximal nail matrix These lines are transverse lines in the nails due to intermittent inflammation causing growth arrest lines. Leukonychia (...) starts distally and progresses proximally, causing a traumatic uplifting of the distal nail plate. Secondary microbial colonization may occur. Nail plate crumbling Nail plate weakening due to disease of the underlying structures causes this condition. Splinter hemorrhage/dilated tortuous capillaries in the dermal papillae Splinter hemorrhages are longitudinal black lines due to minute foci of capillary hemorrhage between the nail bed and the nail plate. This is analogous to the Auspitz sign

2014 eMedicine.com

86. Polycythemia Vera (Treatment)

statistical significance at levels of 11,000/µL and above (HR 3.90, P = 0.02). An association between elevated WBC counts and thrombosis has also been found in studies of patients with essential thrombocythemia. These authors recommend including the WBC count when evaluating response to cytoreductive therapy. [ ] Initial research has suggested a role for interferon alpha as a first-line treatment, athough toxicity can be problematic. Interferon alpha is not yet approved for use in PV, but phase III (...) . The diagnosis and management of polycythemia vera in the era since the Polycythemia Vera Study Group: a survey of American Society of Hematology members' practice patterns. Blood . 2002 Feb 15. 99(4):1144-9. . . Arber DA, Orazi A, Hasserjian R, Thiele J, Borowitz MJ, Le Beau MM, et al. The 2016 revision to the World Health Organization classification of myeloid neoplasms and acute leukemia. Blood . 2016 May 19. 127 (20):2391-405. . . James C, Ugo V, Le Couedic JP, et al. A unique clonal JAK2 mutation

2014 eMedicine.com

87. Myelodysplastic Syndrome (Overview)

marrow mimicking may be seen. Bone marrow cells display aberrant morphology and maturation (dysmyelopoiesis), resulting in ineffective blood cell production. MDS affects hematopoiesis at the stem cell level, as indicated by cytogenetic abnormalities, molecular mutations, and morphologic and physiologic abnormalities in maturation and differentiation of one or more of the hematopoietic cell lines. [ , , ] See the image below. Blood film (1000× magnification) demonstrating a vacuolated blast (...) published in 2008 and 2016. The 2016 WHO classification of MDS is as follows [ ] : MDS with single-lineage dysplasia (MDS-SLD) – 1 or 2 blood cytopenias; in bone marrow, dysplasia in ≥ 10% of one cell line, < 5% blasts MDS with multilineage dysplasia (MDS-MLD) – 1-3 blood cytopenias, < 1 × 10 9 /L monocytes; in bone marrow, dysplasia in ≥ 10% of cells in ≥ 2 hematopoietic lineages < 15% ring sideroblasts (or < 5% ring sideroblasts if SF3B1 mutation present) < 5% blasts MDS with ring sideroblasts (MDS-RS

2014 eMedicine.com

88. Psoriatic Arthritis (Follow-up)

with psoriatic arthritis, may include the following: Beau lines Leukonychia Onycholysis Oil spots Subungual hyperkeratosis Splinter hemorrhages Spotted lunulae Transverse ridging Cracking of the free edge of the nail Uniform nail pitting Extra-articular features are observed less frequently in patients with psoriatic arthritis than in those with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) but may include the following: Synovitis affecting flexor tendon sheaths, with sparing of the extensor tendon sheath Subcutaneous nodules (...) of autoimmunity, perhaps mediated by complement activation. The inflammatory nature of the skin and joint lesions in psoriatic arthritis is demonstrated by synovial-lining cell hyperplasia and mononuclear infiltration, resembling the histopathologic changes of RA. However, synovial-lining hyperplasia is less, macrophages are fewer, and vascularity is greater in psoriatic arthritis than in RA synovium. The cytokine profile for psoriatic arthritis reflects a complex interplay between T cells and monocyte

2014 eMedicine.com

89. Psoriatic Arthritis (Follow-up)

with psoriatic arthritis, may include the following: Beau lines Leukonychia Onycholysis Oil spots Subungual hyperkeratosis Splinter hemorrhages Spotted lunulae Transverse ridging Cracking of the free edge of the nail Uniform nail pitting Extra-articular features are observed less frequently in patients with psoriatic arthritis than in those with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) but may include the following: Synovitis affecting flexor tendon sheaths, with sparing of the extensor tendon sheath Subcutaneous nodules (...) of autoimmunity, perhaps mediated by complement activation. The inflammatory nature of the skin and joint lesions in psoriatic arthritis is demonstrated by synovial-lining cell hyperplasia and mononuclear infiltration, resembling the histopathologic changes of RA. However, synovial-lining hyperplasia is less, macrophages are fewer, and vascularity is greater in psoriatic arthritis than in RA synovium. The cytokine profile for psoriatic arthritis reflects a complex interplay between T cells and monocyte

2014 eMedicine.com

90. Psoriatic Arthritis (Follow-up)

with psoriatic arthritis, may include the following: Beau lines Leukonychia Onycholysis Oil spots Subungual hyperkeratosis Splinter hemorrhages Spotted lunulae Transverse ridging Cracking of the free edge of the nail Uniform nail pitting Extra-articular features are observed less frequently in patients with psoriatic arthritis than in those with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) but may include the following: Synovitis affecting flexor tendon sheaths, with sparing of the extensor tendon sheath Subcutaneous nodules (...) of autoimmunity, perhaps mediated by complement activation. The inflammatory nature of the skin and joint lesions in psoriatic arthritis is demonstrated by synovial-lining cell hyperplasia and mononuclear infiltration, resembling the histopathologic changes of RA. However, synovial-lining hyperplasia is less, macrophages are fewer, and vascularity is greater in psoriatic arthritis than in RA synovium. The cytokine profile for psoriatic arthritis reflects a complex interplay between T cells and monocyte

2014 eMedicine.com

91. Psoriasis, Nails (Follow-up)

or salmon patch of the nail bed This lesion is a translucent, yellow-red discoloration in the nail bed resembling a drop of oil beneath the nail plate. This patch is the most diagnostic sign of nail psoriasis. [ ] Pitting of the proximal nail matrix Pitting is a result of the loss of parakeratotic cells from the surface of the nail plate. Beau lines of the proximal nail matrix These lines are transverse lines in the nails due to intermittent inflammation causing growth arrest lines. Leukonychia (...) starts distally and progresses proximally, causing a traumatic uplifting of the distal nail plate. Secondary microbial colonization may occur. Nail plate crumbling Nail plate weakening due to disease of the underlying structures causes this condition. Splinter hemorrhage/dilated tortuous capillaries in the dermal papillae Splinter hemorrhages are longitudinal black lines due to minute foci of capillary hemorrhage between the nail bed and the nail plate. This is analogous to the Auspitz sign

2014 eMedicine.com

92. Alopecia Areata (Overview)

and the patches coalesce Ophiasis - Hair loss is localized to the sides and lower back of the scalp Sisaipho (ophiasis spelled backwards) - Hair loss spares the sides and back of the head Alopecia totalis - 100% hair loss on the scalp Alopecia universalis - Complete loss of hair on all hair-bearing areas Nail involvement, predominantly of the fingernails, is found in 6.8-49.4% of patients, most commonly in severe cases. Pitting is the most common; other reported abnormalities have included trachyonychia, Beau (...) lines, onychorrhexis, onychomadesis, koilonychias, leukonychia, and red lunulae See for more detail. Diagnosis Diagnosis usually can be made on clinical grounds. A scalp biopsy seldom is needed, but it can be helpful when the clinical diagnosis is less certain. See for more detail. Management Treatment is not mandatory, because the condition is benign, and spontaneous remissions and recurrences are common. Treatment can be topical or systemic. [ ] Corticosteroids Intralesional corticosteroid therapy

2014 eMedicine.com

93. Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (Overview)

survival. Leuk Res . 2017 May. 56:44-51. . [Guideline] NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology: Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia. National Comprehensive Cancer Network. Available at . Version 5.2017 — October 27, 2017; Accessed: January 16, 2018. Arber DA, Orazi A, Hasserjian R, Thiele J, Borowitz MJ, Le Beau MM, et al. The 2016 revision to the World Health Organization classification of myeloid neoplasms and acute leukemia. Blood . 2016 May 19. 127 (20):2391-405. . Roberts KG, Li Y, Payne-Turner D (...) of a phase II study of imatinib mesylate with hyper-CVAD for the front-line treatment of adult patients with Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Haematologica . 2015 May. 100 (5):653-61. . Ludwig WD, Rieder H, Bartram CR, Heinze B, Schwartz S, Gassmann W, et al. Immunophenotypic and genotypic features, clinical characteristics, and treatment outcome of adult pro-B acute lymphoblastic leukemia: results of the German multicenter trials GMALL 03/87 and 04/89. Blood . 1998 Sep 15

2014 eMedicine.com

94. Acute Myelogenous Leukemia (Overview)

Organization classification of myeloid neoplasms and acute leukemia now includes a subtype "Myeloid neoplasms with germ line predisposition". [ ] Thus, to properly classify patients with AML, these genes must be included in nextgen panels. Some hereditary cancer syndromes, such as Li-Fraumeni syndrome, can manifest as leukemia. However, cases of leukemia are less common than the solid tumors that generally characterize these syndromes. Environmental exposures Several studies demonstrate a relationship (...) the and the , as well as and . Previous References Arber DA, Orazi A, Hasserjian R, Thiele J, Borowitz MJ, Le Beau MM, et al. The 2016 revision to the World Health Organization classification of myeloid neoplasms and acute leukemia. Blood . 2016 May 19. 127 (20):2391-405. . . Smith MT, Skibola CF, Allan JM, Morgan GJ. Causal models of leukaemia and lymphoma. IARC Sci Publ . 2004. 373-92. . Ghiaur G, Wroblewski M, Loges S. Acute Myelogenous Leukemia and its Microenvironment: A Molecular Conversation. Semin Hematol

2014 eMedicine.com

95. Nail Surgery (Follow-up)

, cryotherapy is associated with high cure rates and minimal complications. The postoperative complications of freezing include pain, blistering, and transient neuropathy; the open wound heals by secondary intention within 2-5 weeks. [ ] Less common complications such as depigmentation, nail loss, Beau lines, transient neuropathy, and anesthesia may occur. Pain during the procedure is controlled by providing prophylactic analgesia with 600 mg of aspirin 2 hours before surgery. This regimen is continued 3 (...) at avulsion are associated with failed treatment outcomes and a greater risk of recurrence. Peridigital resection may be used to treat the soft tissue hypertrophy. When this approach is used, 2 incisions are made: the first incision is a curved line, hugging the lateral surface of the digit, and the second incision is made parallel to the first and is extended to the underlying subcutaneous fat to remove a wedge-shaped sample of tissue. At closure, the nail folds in the nail groove are oriented away from

2014 eMedicine.com

96. Intestinal and Multivisceral Transplantation (Overview)

diminished with the introduction of flexible, silastic, silicone rubber catheters; tunneled, cuffed catheters; and improved line care. [ , , ] Less common indications for intestinal transplantation include locally invasive desmoid tumors, premalignant conditions (Gardener syndrome), and fluid and electrolyte losses unmanageable with TPN. [ ] In summary, intestinal transplantation is a salvage procedure applied to patients who have either anatomic or functional diseases that preclude enteral tolerance (eg (...) of the central veins. Intestinal transplantation is considered when the patient has lost 2 or more common venous access sites, such as the subclavian or internal jugular veins, or when unconventional sites such as the right atrial, transhepatic, or direct inferior vena caval catheters are required. Patient history and previous records should reveal the number and type of organisms responsible for previous central venous line infections. Fungal infections requiring mechanical ventilation or vasopressor

2014 eMedicine Surgery

97. Cutaneous Manifestations of HIV Disease (Follow-up)

related to HIV-1 infection. [ ] Beau lines, telogen effluvium, and pallor of the nail beds are the general effects of the chronic illness. Elongation of the eyelashes and softening and straightening of the scalp hair may be observed in HIV disease, and proximal subungual onychomycosis is also usually a sign of HIV disease. The frequency of onychomycosis may be higher in men than in women. Generalized alopecia can occur in patients with HIV who are treated with indinavir, an antiretroviral protease

2014 eMedicine.com

98. Acute Myelogenous Leukemia (Follow-up)

(or no initial complete response) who had no response to first-salvage therapy and received a second or subsequent salvage therapy had a response rate of 0%. These data underscore the need to develop new treatment options for these patients. Response to third-line therapy is even worse. Giles et al studied 594 patients with AML undergoing second salvage therapy from 1980 to 2004. [ ] The patient median age was 50 years. Salvage therapy included allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT), standard-dose (...) cell count every 1–3 months for 2 years, then every 3–6 months up to 5 years. The NCCN recommends a bone marrow aspirate and biopsy only if a peripheral smear is abnormal or cytopenias develop. [ ] Previous References Arber DA, Orazi A, Hasserjian R, Thiele J, Borowitz MJ, Le Beau MM, et al. The 2016 revision to the World Health Organization classification of myeloid neoplasms and acute leukemia. Blood . 2016 May 19. 127 (20):2391-405. . . Smith MT, Skibola CF, Allan JM, Morgan GJ. Causal models

2014 eMedicine.com

99. Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (Follow-up)

of imatinib to chemotherapy. [ , , ] Nilotinib Nilotinib is a tyrosine kinase inhibitor that has a higher binding affinity and selectivity for the ABL kinase than imatinib. [ ] Nilotinib has 20 to 50 times the inhibitory activity against imatinib-sensitive CML cell lines relative to imatinib. In a phase II study in patients with relapsed/refractory Ph+ ALL, complete responses were reported in 24% of patients treated with nilotinib. [ ] Although nilotinib is approved in the relapsed/refractory setting (...) of Relapsed ALL Patients with relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) have an extremely poor prognosis. Most patients are referred for investigational therapies. Patients who have not previously undergone transplantation are referred for such therapy, preferably after obtaining a complete response to salvage therapy. Reinduction regimens include standard chemotherapy regimens (similar to the front-line setting), novel chemotherapeutic agents or immunotherapies (blinatumomab, inotuzumab ozogamicin

2014 eMedicine.com

100. Intestinal and Multivisceral Transplantation (Diagnosis)

diminished with the introduction of flexible, silastic, silicone rubber catheters; tunneled, cuffed catheters; and improved line care. [ , , ] Less common indications for intestinal transplantation include locally invasive desmoid tumors, premalignant conditions (Gardener syndrome), and fluid and electrolyte losses unmanageable with TPN. [ ] In summary, intestinal transplantation is a salvage procedure applied to patients who have either anatomic or functional diseases that preclude enteral tolerance (eg (...) of the central veins. Intestinal transplantation is considered when the patient has lost 2 or more common venous access sites, such as the subclavian or internal jugular veins, or when unconventional sites such as the right atrial, transhepatic, or direct inferior vena caval catheters are required. Patient history and previous records should reveal the number and type of organisms responsible for previous central venous line infections. Fungal infections requiring mechanical ventilation or vasopressor

2014 eMedicine Surgery

To help you find the content you need quickly, you can filter your results via the categories on the right-hand side >>>>