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Balance Error Scoring System

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1. The immediate effects of ankle balance taping with kinesiology tape on ankle active range of motion and performance in the Balance Error Scoring System. (PubMed)

The immediate effects of ankle balance taping with kinesiology tape on ankle active range of motion and performance in the Balance Error Scoring System. This study investigated the changes in ankle active range of motion (AROM) and performance on the Balance Error Scoring System (BESS) in cases in which no tape, placebo taping or ankle balance taping (ABT) with kinesiology tape was used.Randomized cross-over trial.University laboratory.Fifteen physically active individuals (7 men, 8 women (...) ).Postural control was assessed based on performances on the BESS. Active ankle flexibility was assessed by measuring the ankle AROM of both ankles under each taping condition in a random order at 1-week intervals.The ankle AROM among the taping conditions were not significantly different. There were no significant differences in the error scores of single-leg and tandem stances on a firm surface among the taping conditions. Compared to those obtained in the absence of taping, the error scores

2018 Physical therapy in sport : official journal of the Association of Chartered Physiotherapists in Sports Medicine Controlled trial quality: uncertain

2. Sensor-Based Balance Measures Outperform Modified Balance Error Scoring System in Identifying Acute Concussion (PubMed)

Sensor-Based Balance Measures Outperform Modified Balance Error Scoring System in Identifying Acute Concussion Balance assessment is an integral component of concussion evaluation and management. Although the modified balance error scoring system (mBESS) is the conventional clinical tool, objective metrics derived from wearable inertial sensors during the mBESS may increase sensitivity in detecting subtle balance deficits post-concussion. The aim of this study was to identify which stance (...) condition of the mBESS (double stance) best classified those with acute concussion. Inertial sensors provided a sensitive and objective measure of balance in acute concussion. These results may be developed into practical guidelines to improve and simplify postural sway analysis post-concussion.

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2017 Annals of biomedical engineering

3. Correlation of Head Impacts to Change in Balance Error Scoring System Scores in Division I Men’s Lacrosse Players (PubMed)

Correlation of Head Impacts to Change in Balance Error Scoring System Scores in Division I Men’s Lacrosse Players Investigation into the effect of cumulative subconcussive head impacts has yielded various results in the literature, with many supporting a link to neurological deficits. Little research has been conducted on men's lacrosse and associated balance deficits from head impacts.(1) Athletes will commit more errors on the postseason Balance Error Scoring System (BESS) test. (2 (...) on foam ( P = 0.009), total number of errors on a firm surface ( P = 0.042), and total number of errors on a foam surface ( P = 0.007). There were significant correlations only between the total errors on a foam surface and linear acceleration ( P = 0.038, r = 0.36), head injury criteria ( P = 0.024, r = 0.39), and Gadd Severity Index scores ( P = 0.031, r = 0.37).Changes in the total number of errors on a foam surface may be considered a sensitive measure to detect balance deficits associated

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2017 Sports health

4. Effects of a 60 Minute on Ice Game Simulation on the Balance Error Scoring System (PubMed)

Effects of a 60 Minute on Ice Game Simulation on the Balance Error Scoring System Mild traumatic brain injuries (mTBIs) are common in contact sports. There is an association between mTBIs and altered motor function. BioSway technology measures individuals' balance using the Balance Error Scoring System (BESS). Prior to incorporating BESS testing in concussion protocol, other variables that influence the BESS test require review. The objective of this study is to determine if game fatigue (...) in hockey players also influences the BESS score. 23 male (21.08 ± 1.09) National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) athletes were tested using the BioSway™ (Biodex, USA). The BESS test measures the Sway Index (SI) -a calculation of deviation from the center of mass. Balance errors were counted according to BESS standard testing protocol. Baseline and post BESS scores were completed at rest and following exertion in a standard non-contact practice setting. Heart rate and rate of perceived exertion

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2018 International journal of exercise science

5. Postural Control and Head Impact Exposure in Youth Football Players: Comparison of the Balance Error Scoring System and a Force Plate Protocol (PubMed)

Postural Control and Head Impact Exposure in Youth Football Players: Comparison of the Balance Error Scoring System and a Force Plate Protocol Postural control testing is often used by clinicians and athletic trainers to assess the health of athletes during recovery from a concussion. Characterization of postural control as a clinical tool for use with youth athletes is limited though. The objective of this study was to compare performance on the Balance Error Scoring System (BESS) and a force (...) plate protocol at the beginning and end of a season of football within a cohort of 34 healthy youth football players (average age of 9.9 ± 0.6 y). A secondary aim was to investigate if changes in measures of balance from the postseason to the preseason were correlated with head impact exposure. Players completed testing at the beginning and end of the youth football season. There were no significant differences between BESS scores before the season and after the season (P = .54). Performance

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2018 Journal of applied biomechanics

6. An Objective Balance Error Scoring System for Sideline Concussion Evaluation Using Duplex Kinect Sensors (PubMed)

An Objective Balance Error Scoring System for Sideline Concussion Evaluation Using Duplex Kinect Sensors Sports-related concussion is a common sports injury that might induce potential long-term consequences without early diagnosis and intervention in the field. However, there are few options of such sensor systems available. The aim of the study is to propose and validate an automated concussion administration and scoring approach, which is objective, affordable and capable of detecting all (...) balance errors required by the balance error scoring system (BESS) protocol in the field condition. Our approach is first to capture human body skeleton positions using two Microsoft Kinect sensors in the proposed configuration and merge the data by a custom-made algorithm to remove the self-occlusion of limbs. The standing balance errors according to BESS protocol were further measured and accessed automatically by the proposed algorithm. Simultaneously, the BESS test was filmed for scoring

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2017 Sensors (Basel, Switzerland)

7. Modified Balance Error Scoring System (M-BESS) test scores in athletes wearing protective equipment and cleats (PubMed)

Modified Balance Error Scoring System (M-BESS) test scores in athletes wearing protective equipment and cleats Balance testing is an important part of the initial concussion assessment. There is no research on the differences in Modified Balance Error Scoring System (M-BESS) scores when tested in real world as compared to control conditions.To assess the difference in M-BESS scores in athletes wearing their protective equipment and cleats on different surfaces as compared to control (...) conditions.This cross-sectional study examined university North American football and soccer athletes. Three observers independently rated athletes performing the M-BESS test in three different conditions: (1) wearing shorts and T-shirt in bare feet on firm surface (control); (2) wearing athletic equipment with cleats on FieldTurf; and (3) wearing athletic equipment with cleats on firm surface. Mean M-BESS scores were compared between conditions.60 participants were recruited: 39 from football (all males

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2016 BMJ Open Sport — Exercise Medicine

8. Balance Error Scoring System

Balance Error Scoring System Balance Error Scoring System Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Balance Error Scoring System (...) Balance Error Scoring System Aka: Balance Error Scoring System , BESS II. Indications Sideline evaluation in age over 10 years III. Preparation Shoes off and pants (if worn) rolled up to ankle taping removed Athlete stands with eyes closed and hands at hips Two surfaces Firm, flat ground Block of foam large enough to stand on Included in the original BESS, but not in the Three positions for 20 seconds each Double leg stance (both feet on the ground) Single leg stance (balance on one leg) Tandem stance

2018 FP Notebook

9. Is There a Relationship Between the Functional Movement Screen, Star Excursion Balance Test, and Balance Error Scoring System? (PubMed)

Is There a Relationship Between the Functional Movement Screen, Star Excursion Balance Test, and Balance Error Scoring System? To evaluate associations between the Functional Movement Screen (FMS), Star Excursion Balance Test (SEBT), and Balance Error Scoring System (BESS) scores.Correlational.College athletic training facilities.Fifty-two intercollegiate athletes (men = 36 and women = 16) representing 8 sports and cleared for unrestricted sport participation.Participants completed the FMS (...) , SEBT, and BESS, in random order, during 1 testing session. Testing order was randomized to control for fatigue and learning effects.Composite and item scores for the FMS, SEBT, and BESS.A fair, negative correlation was found between FMS asymmetry and SEBT composite (r = -0.31, P = 0.03) scores. Fair, positive correlations were reported for FMS rotary stability task and SEBT anterior (r = 0.37-0.41, P ≤ 0.007) and posteromedial (r = 0.31, P = 0.03) reaches. Fair, negative correlations were reported

2017 Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine

10. Sensitivity and Specificity of the Modified Balance Error Scoring System in Concussed Collegiate Student Athletes. (PubMed)

Sensitivity and Specificity of the Modified Balance Error Scoring System in Concussed Collegiate Student Athletes. To assess the efficacy of the modified Balance Error Scoring System (mBESS) compared with the Balance Error Scoring System (BESS) in an acutely concussed population.Prospective observational study.University athletic training room.Thirty-five collegiate student-athletes (18 Female, 18.9 ± 0.8 year old, height: 1.71 ± 0.12 m, weight: 76.3 ± 24.1 kg) with diagnosed concussions (...) and baseline BESS/mBESS tests.All participants completed the BESS and mBESS on the day after the concussion (acute) and were retested daily until their BESS score achieved baseline value (recovery).The number of errors committed during the BESS and mBESS at each time point were recorded. The sensitivity and specificity of the BESS and mBESS compared with the baseline test was calculated for acute and recovery as well as the mBESS compared with the BESS.At acute, the sensitivity of the BESS and mBESS were

2017 Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine

11. A Normative Dataset of the Balance Error Scoring System in Children Aged Between 5 and 14. (PubMed)

A Normative Dataset of the Balance Error Scoring System in Children Aged Between 5 and 14. Pediatric head injuries occur commonly and are being reported in increasing numbers. Balance testing is a key component in the evaluation of suspected concussion, and the balance error scoring system (BESS) is likely the most well-known and widely used measure. To date, normative BESS scores for adults have been reported but not for children.Normative data for BESS scores and modified BESS scores were (...) groups of 5 to 7 years, 8 to 10 years, and 11 to 14 years of age, for both BESS and modified BESS. Median BESS scores are 23 for children aged 5 to 7, 18 for children aged 8 to 10, and 16 for children aged 11 to 14. Median modified BESS scores are 8 for children age 5 to 7, 5 for children age 8 to 10, and 4 for children age 11 to 14. Increasing age and positive parental opinion regarding their child's balance ability were independently correlated with decreasing BESS scores (P < 0.01).The normative

2016 Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine

12. Head-to-head comparison of measurement properties of the tandem gait and the modified balance error scoring system as part of the SCAT3 following a sports related concussion: a systematic review

Head-to-head comparison of measurement properties of the tandem gait and the modified balance error scoring system as part of the SCAT3 following a sports related concussion: a systematic review Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external (...) of reperfusion (if applicable). ">Data to be extracted: animal model Example: Dose, timing of administration, frequency of administration, route of administration, vehicle. ">Data to be extracted: intervention of interest Example: Serum creatinine; continuous; umol/L (may be recalculated from mg/dL). ">Data to be extracted: primary outcome(s) Example: Blood urea nitrogen; continuous; mmol/L (may be recalculated from mg/dL); Renal histological damage as assessed by Jablonski scale; continuous; Jablonski score

2018 PROSPERO

13. Reliability Testing of the Balance Error Scoring System in Children Between the Ages of 5 and 14. (PubMed)

Reliability Testing of the Balance Error Scoring System in Children Between the Ages of 5 and 14. Pediatric concussion is an extensive public health concern with a complex clinical presentation. Balance assessment has been well-studied in the adult population, but has been limited in children. We aimed to assess the reliability and minimum detectable change (MDC) of the Balance Error Scoring System (BESS) in healthy children.This prospective observational study included 373 healthy children (...) aged 5 to 14. Interrater reliability was assessed by having 4 assessors review videos of 50 random subjects distributed evenly by age and sex across the entire cohort. Intrarater reliability was performed by having assessors review videos of other assessors' live evaluations. Test-retest reliability was obtained by comparing BESS scores as recorded live at the 2 separate time points by the same rater.Local elementary and junior high schools.Three hundred and seventy three healthy children between

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2016 Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine

14. The balance error scoring system learned response among young adults. (PubMed)

The balance error scoring system learned response among young adults. Concussion management practices are important for athlete safety. Baseline testing provides a benchmark to which post-injury assessments are compared. Yet few neurophysical concussion assessment studies have examined learned response. The Balance Error Scoring System (BESS) measures postural stability through 6 conditions by counting the errors committed during each condition. In a study examining the performance of high (...) subject was randomly assigned into 1 of 3 groups to determine learned response at weeks 1, 2, and 4. Changes in pretest and posttest BESS scores were compared using the paired t test for each group at week 4 and other intervals. Differences among groups were compared using analysis of variance for means or the chi-square test for proportions.After 4 weeks, participants exhibited a mean (95% confidence interval) change from pretest baseline of -2.30 (-4.75, 0.16) in the control group (P = 0.065), -3.13

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2014 Sports health Controlled trial quality: uncertain

15. Systematic review of the balance error scoring system. (PubMed)

Systematic review of the balance error scoring system. The Balance Error Scoring System (BESS) is commonly used by researchers and clinicians to evaluate balance.A growing number of studies are using the BESS as an outcome measure beyond the scope of its original purpose.To provide an objective systematic review of the reliability and validity of the BESS.PubMed and CINHAL were searched using Balance Error Scoring System from January 1999 through December 2010.Selection was based (...) have higher agreement than do easier ones. The BESS is valid to detect balance deficits where large differences exist (concussion or fatigue). It may not be valid when differences are more subtle.Overall, the BESS has moderate to good reliability to assess static balance. Low levels of reliability have been reported by some authors. The BESS correlates with other measures of balance using testing devices. The BESS can detect balance deficits in participants with concussion and fatigue. BESS scores

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2012 Sports health

16. Balance Error Scoring System

Balance Error Scoring System Balance Error Scoring System Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Balance Error Scoring System (...) Balance Error Scoring System Aka: Balance Error Scoring System , BESS II. Indications Sideline evaluation in age over 10 years III. Preparation Shoes off and pants (if worn) rolled up to ankle taping removed Athlete stands with eyes closed and hands at hips Two surfaces Firm, flat ground Block of foam large enough to stand on Included in the original BESS, but not in the Three positions for 20 seconds each Double leg stance (both feet on the ground) Single leg stance (balance on one leg) Tandem stance

2015 FP Notebook

17. Regional Models of Care for Systemic Treatment: Standards for the Organization and Delivery of Systemic Treatment

treatment within a RSTP. The main goal of the Model is to facilitate the provision of the appropriate care in the appropriate setting within the appropriate timeframe for all patients, regardless of where a patient receives systemic treatment. The Model is comprised of three integrated institutional structures each with a defined score of practice. The structures are ICPs, affiliate institutions, and satellite institutions. The ICPs are multidisciplinary organizations that provide complex cancer care (...) Regional Models of Care for Systemic Treatment: Standards for the Organization and Delivery of Systemic Treatment Guideline 12-10 Version 2 A Quality Initiative of the Program in Evidence-Based Care (PEBC), Cancer Care Ontario (CCO) Regional Models of Care for Systemic Treatment: Standards for the Organization and Delivery of Systemic Treatment L.Forbes, L.D. Durocher-Allen, K. Vu, D. Gallo-Hershberg, A. Pardhan, K. Kennedy, J. Newton, L. Pitre, D. Root Report Date: July 5th, 2019

2019 Cancer Care Ontario

18. National Early Warning Score

Scores and Scope of the National Clinical Guideline 5 1.1 Definition of Early Warning Scores 5 1.2 How Early Warning Scores work in practice 5 1.3 Scope of the National Clinical Guideline 5 2.0 National Clinical Guideline Recommendations 6 2.1 Essential elements 6 2.2 Clinical processes 6 2.2.1 Measurement and documentation of observations 6 2.2.2 Escalation of care 8 2.2.3 Emergency Response Systems 10 2.2.4 Clinical communication 12 2.3 Implementation 12 2.3.1 Organisational supports 12 2.3.2 (...) .) are routinely recorded in acute hospitals. With the early warning score system each vital sign is allocated a numerical score from 0 to 3, on a colour coded observation chart (A score of 0 is most desirable and a score of 3 is least desirable). These scores are added together and a total score is recorded which is their early warning score. A trend can be seen whether the patient’s condition is improving, with a lowering of the score or dis-improving, with an increase in the score. Care can be escalated

2019 National Clinical Guidelines (Ireland)

19. Interpretive Diagnostic Error Reduction in Surgical Pathology and Cytology

a diagnostic error. Although many types of reviews have been reported, departments should routinely document when departmental reviews occur. These reviews may include but are not limited to: (1) review of a selected percentage of cases, (2) review of selected types of diagnoses, (3) review of a selected organ system or specimen type, (4) review of random cases, (5) review of cases for multidisciplinary conferences, (6) in-house cases sent outside for review, (7) review of cases during cytology-histology (...) systems and process issues that contribute to diagnostic disagreements and potential errors. In monitoring and documenting the results of the review process, individual practices should operate with the knowledge that some diagnoses have a known reputation for high interobserver variability, and that for such cases “disagreements” between observers may not indicate an interpretive error, per se. Examples of such diagnoses include, but are not limited to, epithelial dysplasia in inflammatory bowel

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2016 College of American Pathologists

20. Sideline Performance of the Balance Error Scoring System during a Live Sporting Event. (PubMed)

Sideline Performance of the Balance Error Scoring System during a Live Sporting Event. The purpose was to examine the influence of a live sporting sideline environment on balance error scoring system (BESS) performance.Prospective longitudinal cohort study.The BESS was performed by all participants at 3 locations: (1) quiet laboratory, (2) football stadium sidelines, and (3) basketball arena sidelines.The experimental group had 38 participants (age: 20.1 ± 1.1 years; height: 170.0 ± 7.7 cm (...) of the environment and practice effect.There was a significant interaction for group by environment (P = 0.004), and the SA group committed more errors at both the football and the basketball settings than the control group. The SA group also committed more errors at football (P = 0.028) than baseline. The control group demonstrated a likely practice effect with fewer errors during each administration.The BESS score deteriorated when performed on the sidelines of a live sporting event potentially challenging

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2014 Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine

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