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Bacterial Conjunctivitis

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1. Conjunctivitis: Bacterial, Viral and Allergic

Conjunctivitis: Bacterial, Viral and Allergic Conjunctivitis: Bacterial, Viral and Allergic - medSask Home - College of Pharmacy and Nutrition - University of Saskatchewan Toggle Menu Search the U of S Search Conjunctivitis: Bacterial, Viral and Allergic Infectious or non-infectious Inflammation of the conjunctiva of one or both eyes The conjunctiva is the translucent covering of the sclera (white area) of the eye (bulbar area) and the undersurface of the eyelids (palpebral area) Infectious (...) causes Bacterial: Children : influenzae, S. pneumoniae, S. aureus Adults : aureus, coagulase-negative Staphylococcus organisms, H. influenzae, S. pneumoniae Viral – adenovirus (most common), herpes simplex virus, others Non-infectious Allergic – IgE-mediated reaction triggered by seasonal or perennial allergens Others – dry eye, contact lenses, chemical exposure, reaction to ophthalmic medications, trauma, etc. Common complaint – infectious conjunctivitis accounts for 30 to 40% of eye-related medical

2018 medSask

2. Treatment of acute bacterial conjunctivitis with topical lomefloxacin 0.3% compared to topical ofloxacin 0.3. (Abstract)

Treatment of acute bacterial conjunctivitis with topical lomefloxacin 0.3% compared to topical ofloxacin 0.3. The main purpose of this prospective study was to compare the efficacy, local tolerance, and safety of topical lomefloxacin 0.3% and topical ofloxacin 0.3% in the treatment of acute bacterial conjunctivitis. PATIENS AND METHODS. Forty patients with acute bacterial conjunctivitis were included in a randomized, prospective, parallel-group study. Twenty patients were assigned (...) hyperemia, corneal edema, and ocular discomfort. The score for each clinical sign was recorded before and after treatment. The mean cumulative sum score (CSS) was obtained by adding the scores for signs and symptoms. All conjunctival swabs were cultured and tested for sensitivity. Patients with confirmed bacterial conjunctivitis were included.There were 10 male and 10 female patients in each group. The age range was from 1 to 78 years, and the mean age was 35 years in the lomefloxacin group

2019 European journal of ophthalmology Controlled trial quality: uncertain

3. Correction to: Efficacy and Safety of 0.6% Pazufloxacin Ophthalmic Solution Versus Moxifloxacin 0.5% and Gatifloxacin 0.3% in Subjects with Bacterial Conjunctivitis: A Randomized Clinical Trial, by Baiza-Durán, L., Olvera-Montaño, O., Mercado-Sesma, A.R Full Text available with Trip Pro

Correction to: Efficacy and Safety of 0.6% Pazufloxacin Ophthalmic Solution Versus Moxifloxacin 0.5% and Gatifloxacin 0.3% in Subjects with Bacterial Conjunctivitis: A Randomized Clinical Trial, by Baiza-Durán, L., Olvera-Montaño, O., Mercado-Sesma, A.R 30699060 2019 11 20 1557-7732 35 1 2019 Jan/Feb Journal of ocular pharmacology and therapeutics : the official journal of the Association for Ocular Pharmacology and Therapeutics J Ocul Pharmacol Ther Correction to: Efficacy and Safety of 0.6 (...) % Pazufloxacin Ophthalmic Solution Versus Moxifloxacin 0.5% and Gatifloxacin 0.3% in Subjects with Bacterial Conjunctivitis: A Randomized Clinical Trial, by Baiza-Durán, L., Olvera-Montaño, O., Mercado-Sesma, A.R., and Oregon-Miranda, A.A. J Ocul Pharmacol Ther 2018;34(3):250-255. DOI: 10.1089/jop.2017.0056. 76 10.1089/jop.2017.0056.correx eng Journal Article Published Erratum United States J Ocul Pharmacol Ther 9511091 1080-7683 J Ocul Pharmacol Ther. 2018 Apr;34(3):250-255 29624493 2019 1 31 6 0 2019 1 31

2019 Journal of ocular pharmacology and therapeutics : the official journal of the Association for Ocular Pharmacology and Therapeutics Controlled trial quality: uncertain

4. A clinical comparison of two formulations of tobramycin 0.3% eyedrops in the treatment of acute bacterial conjunctivitis. (Abstract)

A clinical comparison of two formulations of tobramycin 0.3% eyedrops in the treatment of acute bacterial conjunctivitis. To compare the safety and efficacy of a new enhanced viscosity ophthalmic formulation of tobramycin, given twice daily (BID), with the existing four times daily (QID) treatment regimen in patients with acute bacterial conjunctivitis.This was a 12-day, multicenter, observer-masked, randomized, parallel group study. Patients received one drop of tobramycin 0.3% (3 mg/mL (...) demonstrated tobramycin resistance (MIC > 4 mg/mL). However, therapy with both treatments was effective in the majority of the cases.Tobramycin enhanced viscosity ophthalmic solution is well tolerated and has equivalent efficacy to the established treatment regimen with a simplified posology. The formulation provides an alternative therapy for acute bacterial conjunctivitis that should improve patient compliance and satisfaction. (Eur J Ophthalmol 2005; 15: 5 4 1- 9 ).

2019 European journal of ophthalmology Controlled trial quality: uncertain

5. A chronological study of the bacterial pathogen changes in acute neonatal bacterial conjunctivitis in southern China. Full Text available with Trip Pro

conjunctivitis. Bacterial pathogens were detected by Gram staining and subsequent bacterial culture.From the analysis of the bacterial pathogens in 485 cases of acute neonatal conjunctivitis patients from 2002 to 2016 in Southern China, there is an overall trend of decreasing detection of Gram-positive bacteria and increasing detection of Gram-negative bacteria from the conjunctival sac secretions. Gram-positive bacteria in the bacteria-positive samples dropped year by year from 82.6% in 2002 to 72.4 (...) A chronological study of the bacterial pathogen changes in acute neonatal bacterial conjunctivitis in southern China. The aim of the project is to retrospectively study the changes in bacterial pathogens in acute neonatal bacterial conjunctivitis from 2002 to 2016 in Southern China. The results may provide the guidance for drug choice for acute neonatal bacterial conjunctivitis.Secretion specimens for bacterial culture were taken from 485 cases with clinically diagnosed acute bacterial neonatal

2017 BMC Ophthalmology

6. Analysis of the drug therapy of gatifloxacin and levofloxacin in the treatment of acute bacterial conjunctivitis. (Abstract)

Analysis of the drug therapy of gatifloxacin and levofloxacin in the treatment of acute bacterial conjunctivitis. Acute bacterial conjunctivitis is an acute conjunctivitis that is frequently transmitted in summer and autumn. It is a common and frequently occurring disease in ophthalmology clinic. Gatifloxacin is an effective antibacterial drug. It not only maintains the antibacterial effect of the three generation of fluoroquinolones on Gram-negative bacteria, but also enhances (...) the effectiveness of gatifloxacin, including other Gram-positive bacteria and anaerobes. In this paper, by taking gatifloxacin eye drops as the experimental drug and levofloxacin as the control drug, we conducted a double-blind randomized controlled clinical trial to evaluate the efficacy and safety of gatifloxacin eye drops in the treatment of acute bacterial conjunctivitis. The clinical results showed that the total effective rate of the Gatifloxacin treatment group was 95%. Conclusion shows that gatifloxacin

2018 Pakistan journal of pharmaceutical sciences Controlled trial quality: uncertain

7. Efficacy and Safety of 0.6% Pazufloxacin Ophthalmic Solution Versus Moxifloxacin 0.5% and Gatifloxacin 0.5% in Subjects with Bacterial Conjunctivitis: A Randomized Clinical Trial. (Abstract)

Efficacy and Safety of 0.6% Pazufloxacin Ophthalmic Solution Versus Moxifloxacin 0.5% and Gatifloxacin 0.5% in Subjects with Bacterial Conjunctivitis: A Randomized Clinical Trial. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical efficacy and safety of a novel ophthalmic solution of pazufloxacin on the ocular surface of patients with bacterial conjunctivitis after 7 days of intervention.This is a phase 2, double-blind, controlled, multicenter, clinical trial of 300 subjects, randomized (...) surface stains, and clinical signs of tolerability.After intervention, bacterial eradication was reported in all groups: pazufloxacin BID 79%, pazufloxacin TID 84%, pazufloxacin QID 84%, moxifloxacin 80%, and gatifloxacin 82%. There were no significant differences between treatments. Similar results were reported in clinical remission: pazufloxacin BID 89%, pazufloxacin TID 98%, pazufloxacin QID 92%, moxifloxacin 91%, and gatifloxacin 92% (P = 0.03 comparing pazufloxacin BID vs. TID). There were

2018 Journal of ocular pharmacology and therapeutics : the official journal of the Association for Ocular Pharmacology and Therapeutics Controlled trial quality: predicted high

8. Antibodies to Conserved Surface Polysaccharides Protect Mice Against Bacterial Conjunctivitis. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Antibodies to Conserved Surface Polysaccharides Protect Mice Against Bacterial Conjunctivitis. Bacterial conjunctivitis is a major problem in ocular health. Little is known about protective immune effectors in the conjunctiva. We evaluated whether opsonic antibody to the conserved surface/capsular polysaccharide poly-N-acetyl glucosamine (PNAG) expressed by Streptococcus pneumoniae and Staphylococcus aureus was protective against bacterial conjunctivitis, as well as an antibody (...) hours post infection; or intraperitoneal injection of 200 μg 18 hours prior to and then 4, 24, and 32-hours postinfection. After 48 hours, eyes were scored for pathology, mice were euthanized, and CFU/conjunctiva was determined.All methods of antibody administration reduced S. pneumoniae, S. aureus, or P. aeruginosa pathology and bacterial levels in the conjunctivae. Histopathologic analysis showed severe inflammatory cell infiltrates in conjunctivae of mice treated with control MAb, whereas immune

2018 Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science

9. Efficacy of the Ophthalmic Pazufloxacin 0.6% for Bacterial Conjunctivitis, Compared to Gatifloxacin 0.3%.

Efficacy of the Ophthalmic Pazufloxacin 0.6% for Bacterial Conjunctivitis, Compared to Gatifloxacin 0.3%. Efficacy of the Ophthalmic Pazufloxacin 0.6% for Bacterial Conjunctivitis, Compared to Gatifloxacin 0.3%. - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100 (...) ). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. Efficacy of the Ophthalmic Pazufloxacin 0.6% for Bacterial Conjunctivitis, Compared to Gatifloxacin 0.3%. (PRO-157) The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our for details. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03696342 Recruitment Status : Active, not recruiting First Posted : October 4, 2018

2018 Clinical Trials

10. Topical Antibiotics for Clinical and Microbiological Cure of Bacterial Conjunctivitis. (Abstract)

Topical Antibiotics for Clinical and Microbiological Cure of Bacterial Conjunctivitis. 30421517 2019 03 14 1553-2712 26 3 2019 Mar Academic emergency medicine : official journal of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine Acad Emerg Med Topical Antibiotics for Clinical and Microbiologic Cure of Bacterial Conjunctivitis. 345-346 10.1111/acem.13663 Kowalsky Daniel S DS Emergency Medicine Residency, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA. Wolfson Allan B AB https://orcid.org

2018 Academic Emergency Medicine

11. Acute conjunctivitis

and antihistamines; bacterial conjunctivitis treatment includes topical antibiotics; viral conjunctivitis requires symptomatic treatment. Bacterial and viral conjunctivitis is highly contagious; measures to prevent spread of infection should be considered. Definition Conjunctivitis is the inflammation of the lining of the eyelids and eyeball caused by bacteria, viruses, allergic or immunological reactions, mechanical irritation, or medicines. American Academy of Ophthalmology. Preferred practice pattern (...) Acute conjunctivitis Acute conjunctivitis - Symptoms, diagnosis and treatment | BMJ Best Practice You'll need a subscription to access all of BMJ Best Practice Search  Acute conjunctivitis Last reviewed: February 2019 Last updated: January 2018 Summary Symptoms include an irritated red eye with a watery or purulent discharge. Allergic conjunctivitis is usually bilateral with watery discharge and itching. Treatment for allergic conjunctivitis includes topical mast cell stabilisers

2018 BMJ Best Practice

12. Ciclosporin (Verkazia) - Conjunctivitis, Keratitis

Ciclosporin (Verkazia) - Conjunctivitis, Keratitis 30 Churchill Place ? Canary Wharf ? London E14 5EU ? United Kingdom An agency of the European Union Telephone +44 (0)20 3660 6000 Facsimile +44 (0)20 3660 5555 Send a question via our website www.ema.europa.eu/contact © European Medicines Agency, 2018. Reproduction is authorised provided the source is acknowledged. 20 July 2017 EMA/505143/2017 Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use (CHMP) Assessment report Verkazia International non (...) by an inflammation of the conjunctivitis with corneal involvement and tissue remodelling including papillae formation. It was first described by Arlt in 1846 who reported 3 cases of perilimbal swelling in young patients. The association with springtime (vernal) reflects the seasonal increase in signs and symptoms of the condition, particularly the high prevalence in hot, arid environments. Affected individuals have disease flares frequently during spring months, but can have signs and symptoms year round

2018 European Medicines Agency - EPARs

13. Moxifloxacin 0.5 % eye drop solution (Vigamox) for bacterial conjunctivitis

Moxifloxacin 0.5 % eye drop solution (Vigamox) for bacterial conjunctivitis 14/2011 Moxifloxacin 0.5% eye drop solution (Vigamox ® ) for bacterial conjunctivitis Cheaper eye drops are just as useful to us Indications 1 Moxifloxacin eye drops are indicated for the treatment of bacterial conjunctivitis caused by susceptible strains of Corynebacterium spp, Micrococcus luteus, S. aureus, S. epidermidis, S. haemolyticus, S. hominis, S. warneri, S. pneumoniae Mechanism of action and pharmacokinetics (...) 1 Fourth generation fluoroquinolones are effec- tive against a great number of gram positive aerobic microorganisms, gram negative aero- bic and anaerobic microorganisms. They should not be employed in bacterial conjunc- n Moxifloxacin 0.5% eye drop solution is in- dicated in the management of purulent bacterial conjunctivitis. n In the only study published comparing mo- xifloxacin to polymyxin B sulfate/trimetho- prim ophthalmic solution, the former sho- wed a greater percentage of clinical

2012 Drug and Therapeutics Bulletin of Navarre (Spain)

14. Patient demographic and microbiology trends in bacterial conjunctivitis in children. (Abstract)

Patient demographic and microbiology trends in bacterial conjunctivitis in children. The management of bacterial conjunctivitis has a significant economic impact, despite the relatively benign nature of the disease. We reviewed the medical records for children diagnosed with conjunctivitis at inpatient and outpatient facilities of a tertiary university center over a 5-year period to examine the microbial trends and physician practice patterns and found that most cases of conjunctivitis were (...) treated empirically. When cultures were performed and an organism was recovered, there were significant differences in the organism based on age. Although bacterial conjunctivitis accounted for only 10% of cases, antibiotics were dispensed in more than half of the cases. Pediatricians prescribed antibiotics for conjunctivitis more than twice as often as ophthalmologists. Less than 5% of patients who did not receive antibiotics returned to clinic within 1 month for persistent symptoms.Copyright © 2017

2017 JAAPOS - Journal of the American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus

15. Besifloxacin Ophthalmic Suspension 0.6% Compared with Gatifloxacin Ophthalmic Solution 0.3% for the Treatment of Bacterial Conjunctivitis in Neonates. Full Text available with Trip Pro

subjects were included in the intent-to-treat (ITT) population. All were aged <28 days, with a mean (standard deviation) age of 15.5 days (6.0), and 57.6% were female. Twenty-two subjects had culture-confirmed conjunctivitis in at least one eye (modified ITT [mITT] population), most often with Gram-positive bacteria. Visit 5 clinical resolution and bacterial eradication rates were comparable among besifloxacin- and gatifloxacin-treated study eyes (clinical resolution: 12/16 [75.0%] vs. 12/17 [70.6 (...) Besifloxacin Ophthalmic Suspension 0.6% Compared with Gatifloxacin Ophthalmic Solution 0.3% for the Treatment of Bacterial Conjunctivitis in Neonates. The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of topical besifloxacin ophthalmic suspension 0.6% compared with gatifloxacin ophthalmic solution 0.3% in the treatment of bacterial conjunctivitis in neonates.This was a multicenter, randomized, double-masked, parallel group study. Subjects ≤31 days of age with severity grade ≥1

2017 Drugs in R&D Controlled trial quality: predicted high

16. AdenoPlus point-of-care test for diagnosing adenoviral conjunctivitis

for diagnosing adenoviral conjunctivitis (MIB46) © NICE 2018. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and- conditions#notice-of-rights). Page 3 of 23self-limiting, the person is still infectious for up to 14 to 21 days after infection (Kaufman 2011). Transmission of the infection is mostly by hand-to-eye contact, ocular secretions, respiratory droplets, and contact with ophthalmic care providers and their instruments (Azar et al. 1996). Viral and bacterial (...) confirmation, with many cases misdiagnosed as bacterial conjunctivitis (O'Brien et al. 2009). Only 36% of 300 UK-based GPs who completed a postal questionnaire believed that they could discriminate between viral and bacterial infection, and there was considerable variability in the use of individual signs to make a diagnosis of infectious conjunctivitis. The same survey found that 95% of GPs usually prescribe topical antibiotics (used to treat bacterial conjunctivitis) for infectious conjunctivitis despite

2015 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Advice

17. Bacterial Conjunctivitis

Bacterial Conjunctivitis Bacterial Conjunctivitis Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Bacterial Conjunctivitis Bacterial (...) Conjunctivitis Aka: Bacterial Conjunctivitis From Related Chapters II. Epidemiology Transmission typically via direct contact with contaminated items (esp. fingers) Infectious for first 48 hours of treatment III. Causes Newborns (see ) See in Children (*) e (*) species species Adults (*) epidermidis species Pseudomonas species (especially with wear) species ( ) IV. Symptoms Sudden onset Unilateral Progresses to other eye in 2-5 days Mucopurulent discharge Copious gray, yellow, or green discharge Consider

2018 FP Notebook

18. Community-based antibiotic delivery for possible serious bacterial infections in neonates in low- and middle-income countries. (Abstract)

Community-based antibiotic delivery for possible serious bacterial infections in neonates in low- and middle-income countries. The recommended management for neonates with a possible serious bacterial infection (PSBI) is hospitalisation and treatment with intravenous antibiotics, such as ampicillin plus gentamicin. However, hospitalisation is often not feasible for neonates in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Therefore, alternative options for the management of neonatal PSBI in LMICs (...) -interventions in conjunction with community-based antibiotics. Community-based antibiotic delivery for neonatal PSBI showed a possible effect on reducing sepsis-specific neonatal mortality (typical RR 0.78, 95% CI 0.60 to 1.00; 2 studies, n = 40,233; low-quality evidence).For the second comparison, five studies met the inclusion criteria. Using a simplified antibiotic approach resulted in similar rates of neonatal mortality when compared to the standard regimen of seven days of injectable procaine

2019 Cochrane

19. Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth

Carolina, USA; 4 Division of Gastroenterology/Hepatology, Augusta University, Augusta, Georgia, USA. Correspondence: Mark Pimentel, MD, FRCP(C), FACG. E-mail: . Received February 13, 2019 Accepted November 12, 2019 Online date: January 8, 2020 The American Journal of Gastroenterology: doi: 10.14309/ajg.0000000000000501 Free Metrics Abstract Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth is defined as the presence of excessive numbers of bacteria in the small bowel, causing gastrointestinal symptoms (...) . INTRODUCTION Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) has been recognized as a medical phenomenon for many decades. Although its definition has been debated, the principle concept is that the normal small bowel has lower levels of microbial colonization compared with the colon and this normal balance is significantly altered in SIBO. SIBO is defined as the presence of excessive numbers of bacteria in the small bowel causing gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms. These bacteria are usually coliforms, which

2020 American College of Gastroenterology

20. Conjunctivitis - infective

Conjunctivitis - infective Conjunctivitis - infective - NICE CKS Share Conjunctivitis - infective: Summary Infective conjunctivitis is inflammation of the conjunctiva due to viral, bacterial or parasitic infection. Viral conjunctivitis is the most common infectious conjunctivitis — the majority of cases are caused by adenoviruses. The most common bacterial causes of conjunctivitis are Streptococcus pneumoniae , Staphylococcus aureus and Haemophilus influenzae . Hyperacute conjunctivitis (...) is a rapidly developing severe conjunctivitis typically caused by infection with Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Ophthalmia neonatorum (ON) is conjunctivitis occurring within the first four weeks of life — it can be infectious or non-infectious. Acute conjunctivitis is usually self-limiting and rarely causes loss of vision. Viral conjunctivitis usually resolves within 7 days. Epidemic keratoconjunctivitis (caused by adenoviruses) can lead to visual loss and light sensitivity. Bacterial conjunctivitis typically

2018 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

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