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Atypical Mole Syndrome

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1. Oncogenetic testing, diagnosis and follow-up in Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome, familial atypical multiple mole melanoma syndrome and neurofibromatosis 1 and 2

Oncogenetic testing, diagnosis and follow-up in Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome, familial atypical multiple mole melanoma syndrome and neurofibromatosis 1 and 2 Oncogenetic testing, diagnosis and follow-up in Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome, familial atypical multiple mole melanoma syndrome and neurofibromatosis 1 and 2. Oncogenetic testing, diagnosis and follow-up in Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome, familial atypical multiple mole melanoma syndrome and neurofibromatosis 1 and 2. Robays J, Stordeur S, Hulstaert F (...) , Poppe B. Oncogenetic testing, diagnosis and follow-up in Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome, familial atypical multiple mole melanoma syndrome and neurofibromatosis 1 and 2. Brussels: Belgian Health Care Knowledge Centre (KCE). KCE Reports 243. 2015 Authors' objectives This guideline treats the Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome, the familial atypical multiple mole melanoma syndrome and neurofibromatosis 1&2. These syndromes only have in common that dermatological manifestations are involved, but implications, risks

2015 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.

2. Oncogenetic testing, diagnosis and follow-up in Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome, familial atypical multiple mole melanoma syndrome and neurofibromatosis 1 and 2

Oncogenetic testing, diagnosis and follow-up in Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome, familial atypical multiple mole melanoma syndrome and neurofibromatosis 1 and 2 2015 www.kce.fgov.be KCE REPORT 243Cs SUMMARY ONCOGENETIC TESTING, DIAGNOSIS AND FOLLOW-UP IN BIRT- HOGG-DUBÉ SYNDROME, FAMILIAL ATYPICAL MULTIPLE MOLE MELANOMA SYNDROME AND NEUROFIBROMATOSIS 1 AND 2 2015 www.kce.fgov.be KCE REPORT 243Cs GOOD CLINICAL PRACTICE SUMMARY ONCOGENETIC TESTING, DIAGNOSIS AND FOLLOW-UP IN BIRT- HOGG-DUBÉ SYNDROME (...) , FAMILIAL ATYPICAL MULTIPLE MOLE MELANOMA SYNDROME AND NEUROFIBROMATOSIS 1 AND 2 JO ROBAYS, SABINE STORDEUR, FRANK HULSTAERT, JEAN-FRANÇOIS BAURAIN, LIEVE BROCHEZ, TEOFILA CAPLANUSI, KATHLEEN CLAES, ERIC LEGIUS, SYLVIE ROTTEY, DIRK SCHRIJVERS, DAPHNÉ T'KINT DE ROODENBEKE, URIELLE ULLMAN, TOM VAN MAERKEN, BRUCE POPPE KCE Report 243Cs Oncogenetic testing in BHD syndrome, FAMMM and Neurofibromatosis 1/2 1 ? FOREWORD This report is the fourth in a series of four practice guidelines on oncogenetic testing

2015 Belgian Health Care Knowledge Centre

3. Familial Melanoma Associated with Li-Fraumeni Syndrome and Atypical Mole Syndrome: Total-body Digital Photography, Dermoscopy and Confocal Microscopy. (PubMed)

Familial Melanoma Associated with Li-Fraumeni Syndrome and Atypical Mole Syndrome: Total-body Digital Photography, Dermoscopy and Confocal Microscopy. Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS) is a rare autosomal dominant disorder caused by a mutation in the p53 gene. Melanoma is considered to be a rare, controversial component of LFS. The aim of this study is to describe the utility of systematic screening for melanoma in patients with LFS and atypical mole syndrome. Two 28-year-old identical twin sisters (...) with LFS and atypical moles were monitored by physical examination, total-body digital photography and dermoscopy be-tween 2006 and 2014. A total of 117, predominantly dark-brown, reticular naevi were identified on case 1 and 105 on case 2. Excisions were performed during the evaluation period of 1 in-situ melanoma and 3 basal cell carcinomas in case 1, and 1 in-situ melanoma and 1 early invasive melanoma in case 2. The remaining melanocytic lesions in both patients were stable during follow-up. The 3

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2017 Acta Dermato-Venereologica

4. CDKN2A founder mutation in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma patients without cutaneous features of Familial Atypical Multiple Mole Melanoma (FAMMM) syndrome (PubMed)

CDKN2A founder mutation in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma patients without cutaneous features of Familial Atypical Multiple Mole Melanoma (FAMMM) syndrome Approximately 5% to 10% of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) has a hereditary basis. In most of these defined hereditary cancer syndromes, PDAC is not the predominant cancer type. Traditional criteria for publicly funded genetic testing typically require the presence of a set combination of the predominant syndrome-associated cancer (...) types in the family history.We report the identification of a CDKN2A pathogenic variant in a PDAC-prone family without the cutaneous features of multiple moles or melanoma that are characteristic of the Familial Atypical Multiple Mole Melanoma (FAMMM) Syndrome identified in a universal testing algorithm for inherited mutations in pancreatic cancer patients.We present the case of two brothers of English ancestry diagnosed with PDAC within the same 12 month period, at the respective ages of 63 and 64

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2018 Hereditary cancer in clinical practice

5. Hereditary melanoma: Update on syndromes and management: Genetics of familial atypical multiple mole melanoma syndrome. (PubMed)

Hereditary melanoma: Update on syndromes and management: Genetics of familial atypical multiple mole melanoma syndrome. Malignant melanoma is considered the most lethal skin cancer if it is not detected and treated during its early stages. About 10% of melanoma patients report a family history of melanoma; however, individuals with features of true hereditary melanoma (ie, unilateral lineage, multigenerational, multiple primary lesions, and early onset of disease) are in fact quite rare (...) . Although many new loci have been implicated in hereditary melanoma, CDKN2A mutations remain the most common. Familial melanoma in the presence of multiple atypical nevi should raise suspicion for a germline CDKN2A mutation. These patients have a high risk of developing multiple primary melanomas and internal organ malignancies, especially pancreatic cancer; therefore, a multidisciplinary approach is necessary in many cases. The value of dermoscopic examination and total body photography performed

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2016 Journal of American Academy of Dermatology

6. Atypical Mole Syndrome

Atypical Mole Syndrome Atypical Mole Syndrome Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Atypical Mole Syndrome Atypical Mole (...) Syndrome Aka: Atypical Mole Syndrome , Dysplastic Nevus Syndrome , Familial Melanoma , Familial Cutaneous Melanoma , FAM-M Syndrome , B-K Mole Syndrome , FAMMM Syndrome From Related Chapters II. Epidemiology Families predisposed to and of relatives with onset at a young age : 32000 in United States with Atypical Mole Syndrome Accounts for ~5% of moles diagnosed in the United States in those with Atypical Mole Syndrome carry significant risk of malignant transformation 10 year risk: 10.7% (>17 fold

2018 FP Notebook

7. Pigmentary Markers in Danes – Associations with Quantitative Skin Colour, Nevi Count, Familial Atypical Multiple-Mole, and Melanoma Syndrome (PubMed)

Pigmentary Markers in Danes – Associations with Quantitative Skin Colour, Nevi Count, Familial Atypical Multiple-Mole, and Melanoma Syndrome To investigate whether pigmentation genes involved in the melanogenic pathway (melanogenesis) contributed to melanoma predisposition, we compared pigmentary genetics with quantitative skin pigmentation measurements, the number of atypical nevi, the total nevus count, and the familial atypical multiple mole and melanoma (FAMMM) syndrome. We typed 32 (...) population. We did not observe any association between any pigmentary marker and the FAMMM syndrome. We suggest that the genetics of FAMMM is not related to the genetics of the pigmentary pathway.

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2016 PloS one

8. Effects of Total-Body Digital Photography on Cancer Worry in Patients With Atypical Mole Syndrome. (PubMed)

Effects of Total-Body Digital Photography on Cancer Worry in Patients With Atypical Mole Syndrome. Cancer worry about developing melanoma in at-risk patients may affect one's quality of life and adherence to screening. Little is known about melanoma-related worry in patients with atypical mole syndrome (AMS).To quantify levels and elucidate predictors of worry related to developing melanoma in patients with AMS and to determine whether total-body digital photography (TBDP) in pigmented lesion

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2014 JAMA dermatology (Chicago, Ill.)

9. Multiple Cutaneous Melanomas and Clinically Atypical Moles in a Patient With a Novel Germline BAP1 Mutation. (PubMed)

Multiple Cutaneous Melanomas and Clinically Atypical Moles in a Patient With a Novel Germline BAP1 Mutation. Several kindreds having germline BAP1 mutations with a propensity for uveal and cutaneous melanomas and other internal malignancies have been described in an autosomal dominant tumor predisposition syndrome. However, clinically atypical moles have not been previously recognized as a component of this syndrome, to our knowledge. We describe the first kindred to date with a germline (...) mutation in BAP1 associated with multiple cutaneous melanomas and classic dysplastic nevus syndrome.We describe a 53-year-old man who was initially seen in 2003 with dysplastic nevus syndrome, multiple atypical melanocytic proliferations showing loss of immunostaining for BAP1, and 7 cutaneous melanomas. Germline testing was performed in the proband, his 16-year-old son, and his 13-year-old daughter, revealing a germline mutation in the BAP1 gene (c.592G>T, p.Glu198X) in the proband and in his 16-year

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2015 JAMA dermatology (Chicago, Ill.)

10. Atypical Mole (Dysplastic Nevus) (Follow-up)

moles are clinically challenging, and clinical experience with pigmented lesions is often necessary for proper diagnosis. Persons with unusual nevi, familial atypical multiple-mole melanoma (FAMMM) syndrome, or many nevi, usually benefit from consultation with a dermatologist. Previous Next: Prevention Currently, no therapy is available to prevent the development of atypical moles. Multiple studies are ongoing to evaluate therapies for eradication of atypical nevi and chemoprevention of progression (...) . . Elder DE, Goldman LI, Goldman SC, Greene MH, Clark WH Jr. Dysplastic nevus syndrome: a phenotypic association of sporadic cutaneous melanoma. Cancer . 1980 Oct 15. 46(8):1787-94. . Lynch HT, Frichot BC 3rd, Lynch JF. Familial atypical multiple mole-melanoma syndrome. J Med Genet . 1978 Oct. 15 (5):352-6. . Reed RJ. A classification of melanocytic dysplasias and malignant melanomas. Am J Dermatopathol . 1984 Summer. 6 Suppl:195-206. . Rhodes AR, Mihm MC Jr, Weinstock MA. Dysplastic melanocytic nevi

2014 eMedicine.com

11. Atypical Mole (Dysplastic Nevus) (Overview)

nuclear pleomorphism, hyperchromatism, dusty cytoplasm, prominent nucleoli, and hyperchromasia. [ ] Similarly during this time, Lynch et al described a similar nevus phenotype in a melanoma-prone family, coining the phrase, “familial atypical multiple-mole melanoma (FAMMM) syndrome.” [ ] In 1984, Clark introduced five histological criteria for the characterization of a dysplastic nevus. The following features were included in the proposed criteria [ ] : Lentiginous melanocytic hyperplasia Melanocytic (...) , but not in patients with sporadic atypical mole syndrome. [ ] Other genomic events such as loss of heterozygosity (LOH) for tumor suppressor genes are also responsible for the progression from atypical nevi to melanoma, [ ] and the genes thought to be responsible for most familial and sporadic atypical moles are still unknown. Ultraviolet (UV) light (UV-A and UV-B) has been proposed as both an initiator and a promoter in the transformation of melanocytes into atypical melanocytes or melanoma. Atypical nevi have

2014 eMedicine.com

12. Atypical Mole (Dysplastic Nevus) (Diagnosis)

nuclear pleomorphism, hyperchromatism, dusty cytoplasm, prominent nucleoli, and hyperchromasia. [ ] Similarly during this time, Lynch et al described a similar nevus phenotype in a melanoma-prone family, coining the phrase, “familial atypical multiple-mole melanoma (FAMMM) syndrome.” [ ] In 1984, Clark introduced five histological criteria for the characterization of a dysplastic nevus. The following features were included in the proposed criteria [ ] : Lentiginous melanocytic hyperplasia Melanocytic (...) , but not in patients with sporadic atypical mole syndrome. [ ] Other genomic events such as loss of heterozygosity (LOH) for tumor suppressor genes are also responsible for the progression from atypical nevi to melanoma, [ ] and the genes thought to be responsible for most familial and sporadic atypical moles are still unknown. Ultraviolet (UV) light (UV-A and UV-B) has been proposed as both an initiator and a promoter in the transformation of melanocytes into atypical melanocytes or melanoma. Atypical nevi have

2014 eMedicine.com

13. Atypical Mole (Dysplastic Nevus) (Treatment)

moles are clinically challenging, and clinical experience with pigmented lesions is often necessary for proper diagnosis. Persons with unusual nevi, familial atypical multiple-mole melanoma (FAMMM) syndrome, or many nevi, usually benefit from consultation with a dermatologist. Previous Next: Prevention Currently, no therapy is available to prevent the development of atypical moles. Multiple studies are ongoing to evaluate therapies for eradication of atypical nevi and chemoprevention of progression (...) . . Elder DE, Goldman LI, Goldman SC, Greene MH, Clark WH Jr. Dysplastic nevus syndrome: a phenotypic association of sporadic cutaneous melanoma. Cancer . 1980 Oct 15. 46(8):1787-94. . Lynch HT, Frichot BC 3rd, Lynch JF. Familial atypical multiple mole-melanoma syndrome. J Med Genet . 1978 Oct. 15 (5):352-6. . Reed RJ. A classification of melanocytic dysplasias and malignant melanomas. Am J Dermatopathol . 1984 Summer. 6 Suppl:195-206. . Rhodes AR, Mihm MC Jr, Weinstock MA. Dysplastic melanocytic nevi

2014 eMedicine.com

14. Atypical Mole Syndrome

Atypical Mole Syndrome Atypical Mole Syndrome Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Atypical Mole Syndrome Atypical Mole (...) Syndrome Aka: Atypical Mole Syndrome , Dysplastic Nevus Syndrome , Familial Melanoma , Familial Cutaneous Melanoma , FAM-M Syndrome , B-K Mole Syndrome , FAMMM Syndrome From Related Chapters II. Epidemiology Families predisposed to and of relatives with onset at a young age : 32000 in United States with Atypical Mole Syndrome Accounts for ~5% of moles diagnosed in the United States in those with Atypical Mole Syndrome carry significant risk of malignant transformation 10 year risk: 10.7% (>17 fold

2015 FP Notebook

15. Atypical mole syndrome and dysplastic nevi: identification of populations at risk for developing melanoma - review article (PubMed)

Atypical mole syndrome and dysplastic nevi: identification of populations at risk for developing melanoma - review article Atypical Mole Syndrome is the most important phenotypic risk factor for developing cutaneous melanoma, a malignancy that accounts for about 80% of deaths from skin cancer. Because the diagnosis of melanoma at an early stage is of great prognostic relevance, the identification of Atypical Mole Syndrome carriers is essential, as well as the creation of recommended

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2011 Clinics

16. Familial atypical multiple mole-melanoma syndrome. (PubMed)

Familial atypical multiple mole-melanoma syndrome. A family is described showing concordance for malignant melanoma and a cutaneous phenotype characterised by multiple large moles of variable size and colour (reddish-brown to bright red) with pigmentary leakage. Transmission of the cutaneous phenotype in the subject family, and in several others currently under investigation, shows an inheritance pattern consistent with a simple autosomal dominant factor. This cutaneous phenotype signifying

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1978 Journal of Medical Genetics

17. Atypical Moles

. MARAZZI/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY The propensity to develop AM may be inherited (autosomal dominant) or sporadic without apparent familial association. Familial atypical mole–melanoma syndrome refers to the presence of multiple AM and melanoma in ≥ 2 1st-degree relatives. These patients are at markedly increased risk (25 times) of melanoma. Symptoms and Signs AM are often larger than other nevi ( > 6 mm diameter) and primarily round (unlike many melanomas) but with indistinct borders and mild asymmetry (...) with cutaneous melanomas) have a high lifetime risk of developing melanomas. The entire skin (including the scalp) of members of an at-risk family should be examined at least once to determine risk and needed follow-up. Key Points Risk of melanoma is higher if patients have increased numbers of AM, increased sun exposure, or familial atypical mole–melanoma syndrome. Because clinical differentiation from melanoma can be difficult, biopsy the worst-appearing AMs. Closely follow patients with AM, particularly

2013 Merck Manual (19th Edition)

18. Genetic Testing and Management of Hereditary Gastrointestinal Cancer Syndromes

genetic testing is currently not routinely recommended for SPS patients; testing for MUTYH mutations may be considered for SPS patients with concurrent adenomas and/or a family history of adenomas. Hereditary pancreatic cancer Individuals should be considered to be at risk for familial pancreatic adenocarcinoma if they (i) have a known genetic syndrome associated with pancreatic cancer, including hereditary breast–-ovarian cancer syndrome, familial atypical multiple melanoma and mole syndrome (FAMMM (...) recommendation, very low quality of evidence). Hereditary pancreatic cancer 22. Surveillance of individuals with a genetic predisposition for pancreatic adenocarcinoma should ideally be performed in experienced centers utilizing a multidisciplinary approach and under research conditions. These individuals should be known mutation carriers from hereditary syndromes associated with increased risk of pancreatic cancer (Peutz–Jeghers, hereditary pancreatitis, familial atypical multiple melanoma and mole syndrome

2015 American College of Gastroenterology

19. Pilot Study Evaluating Sulforaphane in Atypical Nevi-Precursor Lesions

of Pittsburgh Study Details Study Description Go to Brief Summary: This is a pilot study to see if oral administration of freeze dried, powdered broccoli sprouts have any effect on whether moles end up becoming melanoma. Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase Atypical Nevi Melanoma Drug: broccoli sprout extract - sulforaphane (BSE-SFN) Early Phase 1 Detailed Description: This study is designed as a pilot evaluation of sulforaphane as a candidate natural nutritional chemopreventive agent able (...) Pilot Study Evaluating Sulforaphane in Atypical Nevi-Precursor Lesions Pilot Study Evaluating Sulforaphane in Atypical Nevi-Precursor Lesions - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. Pilot Study

2012 Clinical Trials

20. Public health guidance on HIV, hepatitis B and C testing in the EU/EEA

– An integrated approach v Abbreviations AIDS Acquired immune deficiency syndrome ALT Alanine aminotransferase Anti-HB Antibody to hepatitis B surface antigen Anti-HCV Antibody to HCV ART Antiretroviral therapy BBV Blood-borne virus CD4 Cluster of differentiation 4 CDC Centers for Disease Control and Prevention DAA Direct-acting antiviral DBS Dried blood spot DNA Deoxyribonucleic acid EACS European AIDS Clinical Society EASL European Association for the Study of the Liver EATG European AIDS Treatment Group EU

2019 European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control - Public Health Guidance

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