How to Trip Rapid Review

Step 1: Select articles relevant to your search (remember the system is only optimised for single intervention studies)

Step 2: press

Step 3: review the result, and maybe amend the or if you know better! If we're unsure of the overall sentiment of the trial we will display the conclusion under the article title. We then require you to tell us what the correct sentiment is.

51 results for

Atrophic Glossitis

by
...
Latest & greatest
Alerts

Export results

Use check boxes to select individual results below

SmartSearch available

Trip's SmartSearch engine has discovered connected searches & results. Click to show

1. The Candida species that are important for the development of atrophic glossitis in xerostomia patients. (PubMed)

The Candida species that are important for the development of atrophic glossitis in xerostomia patients. The purpose of this study was to clarify the species of Candida that are important for the development of atrophic glossitis in xerostomia patients.A total of 231 patients with subjective dry mouth were enrolled in the present study. Logistic regression analysis was performed to clarify the contribution of each Candida species and other variables to the development of atrophic glossitis (...) . The dependent variable was the absence/presence of atrophic glossitis. The Candida colony-forming units (CFU) of C. albicans, C. glabrata, C. tropicalis, and C. krusei, as well as age, gender, resting (RSFR) and stimulated (SSFR) whole salivary flow rate, and denture-wearing status, were treated as explanatory variables.Logistic regression analysis showed that two factors were closely associated with the presence of atrophic glossitis: an increase in C. albicans CFU and a decrease in the SSFR.C. albicans

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2017 BMC Oral Health

2. Atrophic Glossitis

Atrophic Glossitis Atrophic Glossitis Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Atrophic Glossitis Atrophic Glossitis Aka (...) : Atrophic Glossitis , Smooth Tongue From Related Chapters II. Pathophysiology atrophy III. Symptoms dryness Intermittent s of taste may be severe in advanced stages IV. Signs Complete or patchy baldness Smooth, slick, sore with lost papillae Atrophied hyperemic papillae (small punctate red dots) V. Causes Other possible eficiencies deficiency deficiency Anti-cancer drugs Riley-Day Dysautonia Syndrome VI. Management Treat underlying cause (e.g. nutritional deficiency) Soft, bland diet Images: Related

2018 FP Notebook

3. HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQB1 Genotyping for Autoantibody-positive and -Negative Patients With Atrophic Glossitis or Burning Mouth Syndrome

HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQB1 Genotyping for Autoantibody-positive and -Negative Patients With Atrophic Glossitis or Burning Mouth Syndrome HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQB1 Genotyping for Autoantibody-positive and -Negative Patients With Atrophic Glossitis or Burning Mouth Syndrome - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have (...) reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQB1 Genotyping for Autoantibody-positive and -Negative Patients With Atrophic Glossitis or Burning Mouth Syndrome The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our for details. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01931293

2013 Clinical Trials

4. Atrophic Glossitis

Atrophic Glossitis Atrophic Glossitis Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Atrophic Glossitis Atrophic Glossitis Aka (...) : Atrophic Glossitis , Smooth Tongue From Related Chapters II. Pathophysiology atrophy III. Symptoms dryness Intermittent s of taste may be severe in advanced stages IV. Signs Complete or patchy baldness Smooth, slick, sore with lost papillae Atrophied hyperemic papillae (small punctate red dots) V. Causes Other possible eficiencies deficiency deficiency Anti-cancer drugs Riley-Day Dysautonia Syndrome VI. Management Treat underlying cause (e.g. nutritional deficiency) Soft, bland diet Images: Related

2015 FP Notebook

5. Diagnosis of Lingual Atrophic Conditions: Associations with Local and Systemic Factors. A Descriptive Review (PubMed)

Diagnosis of Lingual Atrophic Conditions: Associations with Local and Systemic Factors. A Descriptive Review Atrophic glossitis is a condition characterised by absence of filiform or fungiform papillae on the dorsal surface of the tongue. Consequently, the ordinary texture and appearance of the dorsal tongue, determined by papillary protrusion, turns into a soft and smooth aspect. Throughout the years, many factors, both local and systemic, have been associated with atrophic glossitis (...) as the tongue is currently considered to be a mirror of general health. Moreover, various tongue conditions were wrongly diagnosed as atrophic glossitis. Oral involvement can conceal underlying systemic conditions and, in this perspective, the role of clinicians is fundamental. Early recognition of oral signs and symptoms, through a careful examination of oral anatomical structures, plays a crucial role in providing patients with a better prognosis.

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2016 The open dentistry journal

6. Palliative care - oral

or modified because of mucositis. A cross-sectional survey of terminally ill people (n = 70) who had dry mouth also reported the following problems [ ]: Difficulty talking: 46 people (66%). Difficulty eating: 36 people (51%). Denture problems: among 56 people who wore dentures, 40% had problems. Oral mucosal abnormalities were detected in 45 people (65%), most commonly: Erythema (20%). Coated tongue (20%). Atrophic glossitis (17%). Angular cheilitis (11%). Pseudomembranous candidiasis (9%). Diagnosis (...) . There is usually tenderness, burning, dysphagia, and an unpleasant taste. Acute atrophic erythematous form: white plaques are minimal, and there are painful lesions of the oral mucosa and depapillation of the dorsum of the tongue. This form is often related to the use of broad-spectrum antibiotics. Chronic atrophic erythematous form: denture wearers may develop an area of chronic erythema and oedema usually localized to the part of the palatal mucosa in contact with the dentures. Angular cheilosis: fissuring

2017 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

7. Diagnosis of B12 and folate deficiency

(PCFT; HGNC 30521) gene (proton‐coupled folate transporter deficiency) Inadequate dietary intake Maternal strict vegetarian (vegan) diet in pregnancy. Adherence to a vegan diet post‐weaning – Women of child‐bearing age Pregnancy and lactation Adherence to a low cobalamin diet during pregnancy may lead to metabolic signs of deficiency by the third trimester Maternal deficiency secondary to high fetal and infant requirements Older persons Malabsorption Achlorhydria due to atrophic gastritis and proton (...) autoimmune conditions increase pre‐test probability of pernicious anaemia History of glossitis or mouth ulceration Glossitis is a common presentation of low cobalamin, and mouth ulcers may reflect folate deficiency History of parasthesiae, unsteadiness, peripheral neuropathy (particularly proprioception) Wide differential including cobalamin deficiency, diabetes, carpal tunnel, paraproteinaemia, other causes. Note that neurological presentation of cobalamin deficiency may occur despite normal

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2014 British Committee for Standards in Haematology

9. Oral lesions in Sjögren’s syndrome: A systematic review (PubMed)

and secondary SS were angular cheilitis, atrophic glossitis, recurrent oral ulcerations and grooves or fissurations of the tongue, also when compared to a CG.OL are common and more frequent in SS patients when compared to a CG. This may be a consequence of low levels of saliva. More studies where these OL and all the possible cofounding factors are taken into account are needed.

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2018 Medicina oral, patología oral y cirugía bucal

10. Oral Manifestations in Pediatric Patients with Coeliac Disease – A Review Article (PubMed)

published in English from 2000 to April of 2017. The article is also based on the authors' clinical experience with children with coeliac disease. The searched keywords were "coeliac disease ","oral manifestations ", "dental enamel defects", "recurrent aphthous stomatitis" and "oral aphthous ulcers".There are some oral manifestations which are strictly related to coeliac disease: dental enamel defects, recurrent aphthous stomatitis, delayed tooth eruption, multiple caries, angular cheilitis, atrophic (...) glossitis, dry mouth and burning tongue.The complete knowledge of the oral manifestations of coeliac disease can trigger an effective change in the quality of life of the patients with this disease.

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2017 The open dentistry journal

11. Oral Manifestations in Patients With Anexoria and Bulimia

between the two diseases to determine the management and prognosis of the patients’ dental treatment. Best Evidence (you may view more info by clicking on the PubMed ID link) PubMed ID Author / Year Patient Group Study type (level of evidence) #1) Lo/2008 Patients with eating disorders (anorexia, bulimia, etc.) Critical Review Key results Mucosal atrophy is seen in both anorexia and bulimia due to patients lacking in vitamins and nutrients, and can lead to atrophic glossitis as well as diffuse oral

2012 UTHSCSA Dental School CAT Library

12. Serum zinc levels in 368 patients with oral mucosal diseases: A preliminary study (PubMed)

Serum zinc levels in 368 patients with oral mucosal diseases: A preliminary study The aim of this study was to assess the serum zinc levels in patients with common oral mucosal diseases by comparing these to healthy controls.A total of 368 patients, which consisted of 156 recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) patients, 57 oral lichen planus (OLP) patients, 55 burning mouth syndrome (BMS) patients, 54 atrophic glossitis (AG) patients, 46 xerostomia patients, and 115 sex-and age-matched healthy

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2016 Medicina oral, patología oral y cirugía bucal

13. Prosthodontic Management of Xerostomic Patient: A Technical Modification (PubMed)

Prosthodontic Management of Xerostomic Patient: A Technical Modification Xerostomia is often a contributing factor in both minor and serious health problems. It can affect nutrition and dental as well as psychological health. Common problems faced by such patients are glossitis, mucositis, angular cheilitis, dysgeusia, and difficulty in chewing and swallowing. One of the major problems associated with xerostomic patients is the poor tolerance and retention of removable dental prostheses because (...) of thin dry atrophic mucosa and lack of a saliva film. This paper describes a new technique of incorporating a salivary reservoir in the maxillary complete denture. The salivary reservoir fabricated by this technique provided good lubrication of the oral tissues and was easily cleansed by the wearer and was fabricated from routine denture materials.

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2016 Case reports in dentistry

14. Urinary tract infection (lower) - women

menopause. Urinary incontinence. Atrophic vaginitis. Cystocele. Increased post-void urine volume. Urine catheterisation and reduced functional status in elderly institutionalised women. [ ; ; ; ; ; ] Prevalence How common is it? Urinary tract infection (UTI) is one of the most common conditions presenting in primary care. Acute UTI occurs in up to 50% of women and estimates suggest that by the age of 24 years nearly one third of females will have had at least one episode of cystitis [ ; ; ]. Recurrence (...) , frequency, urgency, changes in urine consistency, nocturia, and lower abdominal discomfort. Guidance from Public Health England [ ] on diagnosis of UTI recommends first excluding other genitourinary causes of urinary symptoms (such as sexually transmitted infections and atrophic vaginitis) then considering if any of 3 key diagnostic signs/symptoms (dysuria, new nocturia or cloudy urine) are present to guide diagnosis and treatment. A set of health technology assessment studies of diagnostic algorithms

2014 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

15. Candida - oral

(in 13% of women) [ ] . Colonization with Candida is usually asymptomatic. However, where mucosal barriers are disrupted or if the host's defences are lowered, it can cause infections (candidiasis) ranging from non-life threatening superficial mucocutaneous disorders to invasive disseminated disease involving multiple organs. The most common forms of oral candidiasis are pseudomembranous candidiasis (often called oral thrush), erythematous candidiasis (also known as atrophic oral candidiasis (...) ), denture stomatitis, and angular cheilitis. Other forms include hyperplastic oral candidiasis (plaque-like oral candidiasis) and median rhomboid glossitis. See the section on for more information. [ ; ; ; ; ] Causes and risk factors What are the causes and risk factors? There are over 20 Candida species that can cause infection in humans [ ; ] . Oral candidiasis is most commonly caused by Candida albicans , although it can occasionally be caused by other Candida species, such as C. glabrata , C. krusei

2013 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

16. Anaemia - iron deficiency

, malabsorption, increased loss, or increased requirements. Symptoms commonly include fatigue, dyspnoea, and headache. Symptoms of iron deficiency may occur without anaemia. Common signs of iron deficiency anaemia include pallor and atrophic glossitis. Less common signs include: tachycardia, nail changes, and angular cheilosis. There may be an absence of signs, even if the person has severe anaemia. Serum ferritin level is the biochemical test, which most reliably correlates with relative total body iron (...) are unlikely unless the haemoglobin level is less than 7 g/100 mL, and this indicates additional heart or lung pathology. Angina may occur if there is pre-existing coronary artery disease. Symptoms of iron deficiency may occur without anaemia. These symptoms include fatigue, lack of concentration, and irritability. Common or very common signs of iron deficiency include: Pallor – this may be observed even with mild anaemia. Atrophic glossitis. Dry and rough skin, dry and damaged hair. Diffuse and moderate

2013 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

17. Oral Lesions In Non-Celiac Wheat Sensitivity Patients

higher than 0,8 will be obtained for both caries and hypomineralisation. Attention will also be paid to patients with some other oral lesions, such as recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS), symmetric and systematic dental enamel defects, and non-specific atrophic glossitis. Biospecimen Retention: Samples Without DNA Biopsy specimens will be obtained from the bulb and the second duodenal portion. Eligibility Criteria Go to Information from the National Library of Medicine Choosing to participate

2015 Clinical Trials

18. Oral Manifestations of Plummer-Vinson Syndrome: A Classic Report with Literature Review (PubMed)

Oral Manifestations of Plummer-Vinson Syndrome: A Classic Report with Literature Review Plummer-Vinson syndrome (PVS) is a triad of microcytic hypochromic anemia, atrophic glossitis, and esophageal webs or strictures. It is one of the syndromes associated with iron deficiency anemia. Symptoms resulting from anemia predominates the clinical picture, apart from the additional features such as glossitis, angular cheilitis, and dysphagia. Dysphagia is main clinical feature of PVS. PVS carries

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2015 Journal of international oral health : JIOH

20. Megaloblastic Anemia (Diagnosis)

and pancytopenia, gastrointestinal dysfunction and glossitis, personality changes, psychosis, and neurological disorders. [ ] Megaloblastic changes can occur in HIV infections and myelodysplastic disorders as a result of interference of DNA synthesis. [ , , ] Vitamin B-12 and folic acid deficiencies and certain medications are the most common causes of megaloblastic anemia, a macrocytic anemia. Vitamin B-12 differs from other water-soluble vitamins in that it is stored in the liver. In addition, vitamin B-12 (...) Physiological folate absorption and transport is receptor mediated. There is no equivalent of IF to stabilize and transport ingested folate. Uptake occurs in the jejunum and throughout the small intestine. Previous Next: Etiology Major causes for cobalamin deficiency The daily requirement cobalamin is about 5-7 µg/. Dietary cobalamin deficiency rarely causes megaloblastic anemia, except in strict vegetarians who avoid meat, eggs, and dairy products. Atrophic gastritis and achlorhydria commonly occur

2014 eMedicine.com

To help you find the content you need quickly, you can filter your results via the categories on the right-hand side >>>>