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Athetosis

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61. ExAblate Transcranial MRgFUS for the Management of Treatment-Refractory Movement Disorders

to 85 Years (Adult, Older Adult) Sexes Eligible for Study: All Accepts Healthy Volunteers: No Criteria Inclusion Criteria: Men and women, between 18 and 85 years, inclusive. Subjects who are able and willing to give consent and able to attend all study visits. A movement disorder symptom that has been deemed treatment-refractory by a movement disorder neurologist, including: o akathisia, akinesia, athetosis, bradykinesia, chorea, dystonia, tremor, myoclonus, dyskinesia, spasms, tics Medication

2014 Clinical Trials

62. Treatment With Xeomin Versus Botox in Children With Spastic Equine and Equinovarus Foot Deformation in Pediatric Cerebral Palsy

. Exclusion Criteria: Fixed ankle joint contracture. Previous denervation of spastic muscles by surgery, phenol or alcohol; Athetosis and dystonia in the area of injected muscles. Inflammation at the planned injection site. Elevated body temperature and acute (infectious and non-infectious) diseases at the time of injection. Neuromuscular transmission disorders (myasthenia gravis, Lambert-Eaton syndrome, etc.). Decompensated physical diseases potentially affecting the trial findings. Acute fever

2014 Clinical Trials

63. Disorders of bilirubin binding to albumin and bilirubin-induced neurologic dysfunction. (PubMed)

and affinity of albumin, and the presence of displacing substances or infection. Serum unbound bilirubin (UB) concentration may be an ideal marker that reflects changes in bilirubin binding to albumin. Kernicterus, the chronic and with the most severe manifestations beyond BIND, is diagnosed by the presence of motor impairments with athetosis, abnormal magnetic resonance imaging, and/or brainstem auditory-evoked potential findings during infancy and childhood. Preterm infants sometimes have acute bilirubin

2014 Seminars in fetal & neonatal medicine

64. Neurological History and Physical Examination (Overview)

with gravity eliminated 3 Movement against gravity 4 Movement against partial resistance 5 Full strength Involuntary movements Involuntary movements include fibrillations, fasciculations, asterixis, tics, myoclonus, dystonias, chorea, athetosis, hemiballismus, and seizures. Fibrillations are not visible to the naked eye except possibly those in the tongue. Fasciculations may be seen under the skin as quivering of the muscle. Although fasciculations are typically benign (particularly when they occur (...) dysphonia, and writer's cramp. In athetosis, the spasms have a slow writhing character and occur along the long axis of the limbs or the body itself; the patient may assume different and often peculiar postures. The term chorea means dance. Quasi-purposeful movements affect multiple joints with a distal preponderance. Hemiballismus is a violent flinging movement of half of the body. It is associated with lesions of the subthalamic nucleus (ie, body of Louis). Seizures may result in orofacial

2014 eMedicine.com

65. Epilepsy in Children with Mental Retardation (Overview)

or athetosis. Sensory: Children with disabilities and ID are more likely than other children to have visual impairment and hearing deficits Skin: Findings can include hyperpigmented and hypopigmented macules, such as café-au-lait macules (associated with neurofibromatosis type 1), as well as ash-leaf spots (associated with tuberous sclerosis), fibromas, and irregular pigmentation patterns Extremities: Although ID with multiple congenital anomalies and major malformations accounts for only 5-10% of all

2014 eMedicine.com

66. Epilepsy in Adults with Mental Retardation (Overview)

or athetosis. Sensory: Children with disabilities and ID are more likely than other children to have visual impairment and hearing deficits Skin: Findings can include hyperpigmented and hypopigmented macules, such as café-au-lait macules (associated with neurofibromatosis type 1), as well as ash-leaf spots (associated with tuberous sclerosis), fibromas, and irregular pigmentation patterns Extremities: Although ID with multiple congenital anomalies and major malformations accounts for only 5-10% of all

2014 eMedicine.com

67. Childhood Habit Behaviors and Stereotypic Movement Disorder (Diagnosis)

deprivation Factitious disorder with predominately physical signs and symptoms Mannerisms Myoclonus Neglect Neurologically based movement disorder (eg, chorea, dystonic movements, athetosis, myoclonus, hemiballismus, or spasms) Pain Poisoning (eg, with amphetamine or cocaine) Seizure disorder Self-mutilation associated with certain psychotic disorders and personality disorders Self-stimulatory behaviors in individuals with hearing impairment or other sensory deficits Consultation with a developmental

2014 eMedicine Pediatrics

68. Communication Disorders (Follow-up)

, alcohol abuse, infection Hypokinetic Monopitch, reduced loudness, inappropriate silences Extrapyramidal Rigidity, reduced range and speed of movement Parkinson disease, drug induced Hyperkinetic Quick Sudden variations in loudness, harsh quality, hypernasal Extrapyramidal Quick, involuntary, random movements Chorea, myoclonus, Tourette syndrome Slow Unsteady rate and loudness Extrapyramidal Sustained, distorted, slow movements Athetosis, dyskinesia Tremors Rhythmic alterations in pitch and loudness (...) loudness, inappropriate silences Extrapyramidal Rigidity, reduced range and speed of movement Parkinson disease, drug induced Hyperkinetic Quick Sudden variations in loudness, harsh quality, hypernasal Extrapyramidal Quick, involuntary, random movements Chorea, myoclonus, Tourette syndrome Slow Unsteady rate and loudness Extrapyramidal Sustained, distorted, slow movements Athetosis, dyskinesia Tremors Rhythmic alterations in pitch and loudness Extrapyramidal Involuntary, purposeless movements Organic

2014 eMedicine.com

69. Surgical Treatment of Parkinson Disease (Diagnosis)

is speech impairment with dysarthria and hypophonia. The risk of speech abnormalities is 30% after unilateral thalamotomy and greater than 60% after bilateral thalamotomy. Other complications include memory loss, contralateral hemiparesis, and, more rarely, hemineglect, dystonia, hemiballismus, athetosis, and dyspraxia. Preoperative memory and language evaluation can help identify patients who are at greatest risk for postoperative cognitive and language dysfunction. In the largest series, the mortality

2014 eMedicine.com

70. Surgical Treatment of Tremor (Diagnosis)

is speech impairment with dysarthria and hypophonia. The risk of speech abnormalities is 30% after unilateral thalamotomy and greater than 60% after bilateral thalamotomy. Other complications include memory loss, contralateral hemiparesis, and, more rarely, hemineglect, dystonia, hemiballismus, athetosis, and dyspraxia. Preoperative memory and language evaluation can help identify patients who are at greatest risk for postoperative cognitive and language dysfunction. In the largest series, the mortality

2014 eMedicine.com

71. Methemoglobinemia (Diagnosis)

, microcephaly, hypertonia, athetosis, opisthotonos, strabismus, mental retardation, and growth retardation; cyanosis is evident at an early age. Type III – Although the entire hematopoietic system (platelets, RBCs, and white blood cells [WBCs]) is involved, the only clinical consequence is cyanosis. Type IV – As in type I, involvement is limited to the erythrocytes. This type results in chronic cyanosis Deficiency of NADPH-flavin reductase can also cause methemoglobinemia. Acquired methemoglobinemia

2014 eMedicine.com

72. Movement Disorders in Individuals with Developmental Disabilities (Diagnosis)

movements, such as dystonia or athetosis. Sensory: Children with disabilities and ID are more likely than other children to have visual impairment and hearing deficits Skin: Findings can include hyperpigmented and hypopigmented macules, such as café-au-lait macules (associated with neurofibromatosis type 1), as well as ash-leaf spots (associated with tuberous sclerosis), fibromas, and irregular pigmentation patterns Extremities: Although ID with multiple congenital anomalies and major malformations

2014 eMedicine.com

73. Multiple Sclerosis (Diagnosis)

(medial rectus); upper eyelid elevation; and pupillary constriction. [ ] In rare cases, these lesions may be highly selective and may cause weakness of a single muscle, which can lead to diagnostic confusion. The oculomotor nerve runs in close proximity to numerous midbrain structures; therefore, features of a third nerve palsy can be associated with other neurological deficits, including contralateral hemiparesis (Weber syndrome), contralateral tremors (or chorea, athetosis) (Benedict syndrome

2014 eMedicine.com

74. Mental Retardation (Diagnosis)

suggest a genetic disorder, fetal alcohol syndrome, or hypothyroidism; tall stature may suggest fragile X syndrome (FraX), Soto syndrome, or some other overgrowth syndrome associated with MR/ID Neurologic: This examination should include assessments of head growth (for microcephaly/macrocephaly), muscle tone (for hypotonia or spasticity), strength and coordination, deep tendon reflexes, persistent primitive reflexes, ataxia, and other abnormal movements, such as dystonia or athetosis. Sensory

2014 eMedicine.com

75. Cerebral Palsy (Diagnosis)

(AFO) in foot drop to prevent tripping over the toes in a patient with inadequate dorsiflexion. [ , ] If a patient has impaired mobility, a wheelchair and/or mobility aids such as a cane or walker may help. Seating adaptations should be included with a manual wheelchair to keep the back straight and protect the hips from excessive adduction or abduction. A power wheelchair may be needed for children with severe spasticity or athetosis; this device can be introduced to children who have the ability (...) augmentative communication devices if they have some motor control and adequate cognitive skills. Patients with athetoid cerebral palsy may benefit the most from speech therapy, because most of these individuals have normal intelligence, and communication is an obstacle that is secondary to the effect of athetosis on speech. Adequate communication is probably the most important goal for enhancing function in a patient with athetoid cerebral palsy. Many children with cerebral palsy have feeding difficulties

2014 eMedicine.com

76. Epilepsy in Children with Mental Retardation (Diagnosis)

or athetosis. Sensory: Children with disabilities and ID are more likely than other children to have visual impairment and hearing deficits Skin: Findings can include hyperpigmented and hypopigmented macules, such as café-au-lait macules (associated with neurofibromatosis type 1), as well as ash-leaf spots (associated with tuberous sclerosis), fibromas, and irregular pigmentation patterns Extremities: Although ID with multiple congenital anomalies and major malformations accounts for only 5-10% of all

2014 eMedicine.com

77. Epilepsy in Adults with Mental Retardation (Diagnosis)

or athetosis. Sensory: Children with disabilities and ID are more likely than other children to have visual impairment and hearing deficits Skin: Findings can include hyperpigmented and hypopigmented macules, such as café-au-lait macules (associated with neurofibromatosis type 1), as well as ash-leaf spots (associated with tuberous sclerosis), fibromas, and irregular pigmentation patterns Extremities: Although ID with multiple congenital anomalies and major malformations accounts for only 5-10% of all

2014 eMedicine.com

78. Communication Disorders (Diagnosis)

, alcohol abuse, infection Hypokinetic Monopitch, reduced loudness, inappropriate silences Extrapyramidal Rigidity, reduced range and speed of movement Parkinson disease, drug induced Hyperkinetic Quick Sudden variations in loudness, harsh quality, hypernasal Extrapyramidal Quick, involuntary, random movements Chorea, myoclonus, Tourette syndrome Slow Unsteady rate and loudness Extrapyramidal Sustained, distorted, slow movements Athetosis, dyskinesia Tremors Rhythmic alterations in pitch and loudness (...) loudness, inappropriate silences Extrapyramidal Rigidity, reduced range and speed of movement Parkinson disease, drug induced Hyperkinetic Quick Sudden variations in loudness, harsh quality, hypernasal Extrapyramidal Quick, involuntary, random movements Chorea, myoclonus, Tourette syndrome Slow Unsteady rate and loudness Extrapyramidal Sustained, distorted, slow movements Athetosis, dyskinesia Tremors Rhythmic alterations in pitch and loudness Extrapyramidal Involuntary, purposeless movements Organic

2014 eMedicine.com

79. Chorea in Adults (Diagnosis)

). [ ] Any discussion of chorea must also address the related terms athetosis, choreoathetosis, and ballism (also known as ballismus). The term athetosis comes from the Greek word athetos (not fixed). [ , ] It is a slow form of chorea. Because of the slowness, the movements have a writhing (ie, squirming, twisting, or snakelike) appearance. Choreoathetosis is essentially an intermediate form (ie, a bit more rapid than the usual athetosis, slower than the usual chorea, or a mingling of chorea (...) and athetosis within the same patient at different times or in different limbs). Given that the only difference between chorea, choreoathetosis, and athetosis is the speed of movement, some neurologists argue that the term athetosis is unnecessary and even confusing. They argue a simpler nomenclature would delineate fast, intermediate, and slow chorea. While the authors of this article understand the basis of that argument, they also believe that in some cases, the writhing movements are extremely prominent

2014 eMedicine.com

80. Chorea in Children (Diagnosis)

" Neoplastic See the list below: Primary and metastatic brain tumors Primary CNS lymphoma Nutritional See the list below: Vitamin B-12 deficiency in infants Toxins See the list below: Carbon monoxide Manganese Organophosphate poisoning Previous Next: Pathophysiology and General Principles in Treatment of Chorea Movement disorders (particularly chorea, athetosis, and dystonia) are thought to result from basal ganglia pathology. Connections of the basal ganglia can be categorized as follows: Input from (...) motor development, dysarthria, intention tremor, athetosis, and hypotonia. Severity is highly variable but choreic movements are typically continuous and not episodic. Intellectual function is typically normal. Intellectual impairment has been reported in one family in which affected individuals had intelligence quotient scores averaging 10 points lower than unaffected relatives. Functional neuroimaging showed decreased striatal FDG metabolism in one study. Routine imaging and EEG results are normal

2014 eMedicine.com

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