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Aphasia

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161. Translation and Clinical Implementation of a Test of Language and Short-term Memory in Aphasia.

Translation and Clinical Implementation of a Test of Language and Short-term Memory in Aphasia. Translation and Clinical Implementation of a Test of Language and Short-term Memory in Aphasia. - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one (...) or more studies before adding more. Translation and Clinical Implementation of a Test of Language and Short-term Memory in Aphasia. (Clinical TALSA) The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. of clinical studies and talk to your health care provider before participating. Read our for details. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03635554 Recruitment

2018 Clinical Trials

162. Crossed Aphasia as a Manifestation of Glioblastoma Full Text available with Trip Pro

Crossed Aphasia as a Manifestation of Glioblastoma Language and speech function is commonly accepted to be a heavily lateralized function. Greater than 95% of right-handed individuals have left hemispheric dominance for language, and reports in the literature of crossed aphasia (language deficits in a right-handed individual from right-sided pathology) are scant. We report the case of a 52-year-old woman presenting with crossed aphasia from a right temporal glioblastoma. We then expand (...) on a discussion of crossed aphasia in the setting of brain tumors.

2018 Cureus

163. A Longitudinal Study of a Chinese Man Presenting with Non-Fluent/Agrammatic Variant of Primary Progressive Aphasia Full Text available with Trip Pro

A Longitudinal Study of a Chinese Man Presenting with Non-Fluent/Agrammatic Variant of Primary Progressive Aphasia Primary progressive aphasia (PPA) is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by declining language ability. However, the difficulty in defining the central clinical features in its earliest stage and establishing the dynamics of its progression has led to controversy. We report a 71-year-old man with Han language suffering from non-fluent/agrammatic variant of PPA but presenting

2018 Frontiers in neurology

164. Multifunctional Roles of the Ventral Stream in Language Models: Advanced Segmental Quantification in Post-Stroke Aphasic Patients Full Text available with Trip Pro

Multifunctional Roles of the Ventral Stream in Language Models: Advanced Segmental Quantification in Post-Stroke Aphasic Patients In the dual-route language model, the dorsal pathway is known for sound-to-motor mapping, but the role of the ventral stream is controversial. With the goal of enhancing our understanding of language models, this study investigated the diffusion characteristics of candidate tracts in aphasic patients. We evaluated 14 subacute aphasic patients post-stroke and 11 (...) confirmed that voxels with significant FA-language correlations were located in the ventral tracts, including the left inferior fronto-occipital fascicle (IFOF) (comprehension: r = 0.839, p = 0.001; repetition: r = 0.845, p = 0.001; naming: r = 0.813, p = 0.002; aphasia quotient: r = 0.847, p = 0.001) and uncinate fascicle (naming: r = 0.948, p = 0.001). Furthermore, point-wise AFQ revealed that the segment of the left IFOF with the strongest correlations was its narrow stem. The temporal segment

2018 Frontiers in neurology

165. The Effect of Speech Repetition Rate on Neural Activation in Healthy Adults: Implications for Treatment of Aphasia and Other Fluency Disorders Full Text available with Trip Pro

The Effect of Speech Repetition Rate on Neural Activation in Healthy Adults: Implications for Treatment of Aphasia and Other Fluency Disorders Functional imaging studies have provided insight into the effect of rate on production of syllables, pseudowords, and naturalistic speech, but the influence of rate on repetition of commonly-used words/phrases suitable for therapeutic use merits closer examination. Aim: To identify speech-motor regions responsive to rate and test the hypothesis (...) and their sensitivity to changes in rate may play an important role in interventions for nonfluent aphasia and other fluency disorders, particularly when right-hemisphere structures are the sole remaining pathway for production of meaningful speech.

2018 Frontiers in human neuroscience

166. Etiology of language network changes during recovery of aphasia after stroke Full Text available with Trip Pro

Etiology of language network changes during recovery of aphasia after stroke Knowledge of spatiotemporal patterns of language network changes may help in predicting outcome in aphasic stroke patients. Here we assessed language function and performed functional MRI four times during one year to measure language network activation and cerebrovascular reactivity (with breath-holding) in twelve left-hemispheric stroke patients, of whom two dropped out before the final measurement, and eight age (...) inferior frontal gyrus were primarily related to differences in vascular reactivity. Furthermore, several language-activation changes could not be linked to alterations in language proficiency nor vascular reactivity, and were assumed to be caused by unspecified intersession variability. In conclusion, early functional neuroimaging improves outcome prediction of aphasia after stroke. Controlling for cerebrovascular reactivity and unspecified intersession variability may result in more accurate

2018 Scientific reports

167. Speech and language therapists’ perspectives of therapeutic alliance construction and maintenance in aphasia rehabilitation post‐stroke Full Text available with Trip Pro

Speech and language therapists’ perspectives of therapeutic alliance construction and maintenance in aphasia rehabilitation post‐stroke Therapeutic alliance refers to the interactional and relational processes operating during therapeutic interventions. It has been shown to be a strong determinant of treatment efficacy in psychotherapy, and evidence is emerging from a range of healthcare and medical disciplines to suggest that the construct of therapeutic alliance may in fact be a variable (...) component of treatment outcome, engagement and satisfaction. Although this construct appears to be highly relevant to aphasia rehabilitation, no research to date has attempted to explore this phenomenon and thus consider its potential utility as a mechanism for change.To explore speech and language therapists' perceptions and experiences of developing and maintaining therapeutic alliances in aphasia rehabilitation post-stroke.Twenty-two, in-depth, semi-structured interviews were conducted with speech

2018 International Journal of Language & Communication Disorders

168. Primary progressive aphasia: a clinical approach Full Text available with Trip Pro

Primary progressive aphasia: a clinical approach The primary progressive aphasias are a heterogeneous group of focal 'language-led' dementias that pose substantial challenges for diagnosis and management. Here we present a clinical approach to the progressive aphasias, based on our experience of these disorders and directed at non-specialists. We first outline a framework for assessing language, tailored to the common presentations of progressive aphasia. We then consider the defining features (...) of the canonical progressive nonfluent, semantic and logopenic aphasic syndromes, including 'clinical pearls' that we have found diagnostically useful and neuroanatomical and other key associations of each syndrome. We review potential diagnostic pitfalls and problematic presentations not well captured by conventional classifications and propose a diagnostic 'roadmap'. After outlining principles of management, we conclude with a prospect for future progress in these diseases, emphasising generic information

2018 Journal of neurology

169. A physician's story of his own illness: Aphasia from possible stroke but more likely from encephalitis Full Text available with Trip Pro

A physician's story of his own illness: Aphasia from possible stroke but more likely from encephalitis 29686583 2018 04 24 0899-8280 31 1 2018 Jan Proceedings (Baylor University. Medical Center) Proc (Bayl Univ Med Cent) A physician's story of his own illness: Aphasia from possible stroke but more likely from encephalitis. 132-134 10.1080/08998280.2017.1400885 Lathan S Robert SR Piedmont Hospital, Atlanta, Georgia. Stuart Douglas D Piedmont Hospital, Atlanta, Georgia. eng Journal Article 2018 (...) 02 01 United States Proc (Bayl Univ Med Cent) 9302033 0899-8280 Aphasia cerebral infarction encephalitis physician patient 2018 4 25 6 0 2018 4 25 6 0 2018 4 25 6 1 epublish 29686583 10.1080/08998280.2017.1400885 1400885 PMC5903504

2018 Proceedings (Baylor University. Medical Center)

170. Noun and verb processing in aphasia: Behavioural profiles and neural correlates Full Text available with Trip Pro

Noun and verb processing in aphasia: Behavioural profiles and neural correlates The behavioural and neural processes underpinning different word classes, particularly nouns and verbs, have been a long-standing area of interest in psycholinguistic, neuropsychology and aphasiology research. This topic has theoretical implications concerning the organisation of the language system, as well as clinical consequences related to the management of patients with language deficits. Research findings (...) , in a relatively large cohort of 48 patients with chronic post-stroke aphasia. A data-driven approach, principal component analysis (PCA), was also used to determine how noun and verb production and comprehension were related to the patients' underlying fundamental language domains. The results revealed no performance differences between noun and verb production and comprehension once matched on multiple psycholinguistic features including, most critically, imageability. Interestingly, the noun-verb

2018 NeuroImage : Clinical

171. The role of language proficiency and linguistic distance in cross-linguistic treatment effects in aphasia Full Text available with Trip Pro

The role of language proficiency and linguistic distance in cross-linguistic treatment effects in aphasia Current findings from intervention in bilingual aphasia are inconclusive regarding the extent to which levels of language proficiency and degree of linguistic distance between treated and non-treated languages influence cross-language generalisation and changes in levels of language activation and inhibition following treatment. In this study, we enrolled a 65-year-old multilingual speaker (...) with aphasia and administered treatment in his L1, Dutch. We assessed pre- and post-treatment performance for seven of his languages, five of high proficiency and two of lower proficiency. We asked whether treatment in L1 would generalise to his other languages or increase interference among them. Forty hours of treatment were completed over the course of five weeks. Each language was tested three times at pretreatment and at post-treatment. Testing included measures of narrative production, answering

2018 Clinical linguistics & phonetics

172. Telerehabilitation for aphasia – protocol of a pragmatic, exploratory, pilot randomized controlled trial Full Text available with Trip Pro

Telerehabilitation for aphasia – protocol of a pragmatic, exploratory, pilot randomized controlled trial The Cochrane review on the effectiveness of speech and language therapy for aphasia following stroke suggests intensity of therapy is a key predictor for outcome. Current aphasia services cannot provide intervention at the intensity observed within trial contexts because of resource limitations. Telerehabilitation could widen access to speech-language pathologists (SLPs) in geographically (...) remote contexts and reduce the time spent on travel by the therapist and patient. The current academic literature within this field is in its infancy, with few trials of speech and language therapy (SLT) delivered by videoconference. Our pilot randomized controlled trial (RCT) will explore feasibility aspects and effectiveness of telerehabilitation for aphasia in addition to standard SLT.Our study is a pragmatic, exploratory, pilot randomized controlled trial, where participants will be randomized

2018 Trials Controlled trial quality: predicted high

173. Malignant atrophic papulosis with motor aphasia and intestinal perforation: A case report and review of published works Full Text available with Trip Pro

Malignant atrophic papulosis with motor aphasia and intestinal perforation: A case report and review of published works Malignant atrophic papulosis (MAP) is a rare type of obliterating vasculopathy that can present as pure cutaneous lesions or a systemic entity affecting multiple organs. Systemic disease, such as gastrointestinal or central nervous system involvement, may predispose the patients to poorer or even fatal outcomes. We present a 30-year-old female patient with systemic (...) manifestation of MAP 10 days after delivery of a full-term pregnancy who subsequently developed motor aphasia and intestinal perforation. The patient was administrated empirical treatment with an antiplatelet, anticoagulant, methylprednisolone sodium succinate and alprostadil. Antibiotics were administrated due to intestinal perforation and secondary sepsis. Despite all treatment, the patient died a week later. We summarized all the previous reports of MAP based on thorough review of previous published work

2018 The Journal of dermatology

174. CNKSR2 mutation causes the X-linked epilepsy-aphasia syndrome: A case report and review of literature Full Text available with Trip Pro

CNKSR2 mutation causes the X-linked epilepsy-aphasia syndrome: A case report and review of literature The mutation in CNKSR2 leads to a broad spectrum of phenotypic variability and manifests as an X-linked intellectual disability. However, we reported that the male patient in this study not only had intellectual disability but also epileptic seizures. In addition, there were progressive language impairment, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and autism. Electroencephalograms showed (...) continuous spike-and-wave during sleep. Genetic testing revealed a de novo mutation of the CNKSR2 gene (c.2185C>T, p.Arg729Ter) in the child that was not detected in the parents. Therefore, the child was diagnosed with X-linked epilepsy aphasia syndrome. Deletion of the CNKSR2 gene has been rarely reported in epilepsy aphasia syndrome, but no de novo mutation has been found in this gene. This report not only adds to the spectrum of epilepsy aphasia syndrome but also helps clinicians in diagnosis

2018 World journal of clinical cases

175. Sensitivity of Speech Output to Delayed Auditory Feedback in Primary Progressive Aphasias Full Text available with Trip Pro

Sensitivity of Speech Output to Delayed Auditory Feedback in Primary Progressive Aphasias Delayed auditory feedback (DAF) is a classical paradigm for probing sensori-motor interactions in speech output and has been studied in various disorders associated with speech dysfluency and aphasia. However, little information is available concerning the effects of DAF on degenerating language networks in primary progressive aphasia: the paradigmatic "language-led dementias." Here we studied two forms (...) of speech output (reading aloud and propositional speech) under natural listening conditions (no feedback delay) and under DAF at 200 ms, in a cohort of 19 patients representing all major primary progressive aphasia syndromes vs. healthy older individuals and patients with other canonical dementia syndromes (typical Alzheimer's disease and behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia). Healthy controls and most syndromic groups showed a quantitatively or qualitatively similar profile of reduced speech

2018 Frontiers in neurology

176. The Role of Language Severity and Education in Explaining Performance on Object and Action Naming in Primary Progressive Aphasia Full Text available with Trip Pro

The Role of Language Severity and Education in Explaining Performance on Object and Action Naming in Primary Progressive Aphasia Despite the common assumption that atrophy in a certain brain area would compromise the function that it subserves, this is not always the case, especially in complex clinical syndromes such as primary progressive aphasia (PPA). Clinical and demographic information may contribute to PPA phenotypes and explain the manifested impairments better than atrophy

2018 Frontiers in aging neuroscience

177. Recovernow: A Multicentre Of Tablet-Based Speech Therapy For Post-Stroke Aphasia

longer hospital stays, more severe disability, greater nursing care dependency, are at a greater risk for depression, are discharged to long-term care more frequently, and are less likely to return to work, even when younger. When compared to non-aphasic patients with similar physical abilities, well-being and social supports, patients with aphasia engage in fewer instrumental activities of daily living (iADL) and report worse quality of life. Investigators launched the RecoverNow research program (...) Recovernow: A Multicentre Of Tablet-Based Speech Therapy For Post-Stroke Aphasia Recovernow: Tablet-Based Speech Therapy For Post-Stroke Aphasia - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. Recovernow

2018 Clinical Trials

178. Changes in the corpus callosum during the recovery of aphasia: A case report. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Changes in the corpus callosum during the recovery of aphasia: A case report. The corpus callosum, which is the most important fiber pathway linking the bilateral hemispheres, plays a key role in information access, as well as the functional coordination and reorganization between the bilateral hemispheres. However, whether the corpus callosum will undergo structural changes during the recovery of aphasia is still unclear. In the current study, a Chinese aphasic patient with stroke was reported (...) to develop changes in the corpus callosum after speech therapy.A 33-year-old right-handed male patient had aphasia only without limb paralysis at 14 months after stroke.Neuroimaging evaluation confirmed a diagnosis of cerebral infarction in the left frontal lobe, insula and basal ganglia.He underwent 5-month speech therapy and received language function evaluation and DTI examination before and after speech therapy.The result ABC showed that the language functions in the patient, including spontaneous

2018 Medicine

179. Parkinsonism is associated with altered primary motor cortex plasticity in frontotemporal dementia-primary progressive aphasia variant. (Abstract)

Parkinsonism is associated with altered primary motor cortex plasticity in frontotemporal dementia-primary progressive aphasia variant. In frontotemporal dementia (FTD), the behavioral variant (bv-FTD) and nonfluent variant of primary progressive aphasia (nfv-PPA) reflect a prominent neurodegenerative involvement of the frontal lobe networks, which may include the premotor and motor areas and thus cause heterogeneous clinical symptoms including parkinsonism. With the technique of transcranial

2018 Neurobiology of Aging

180. Modeling Treated Recovery From Aphasia

Modeling Treated Recovery From Aphasia Modeling Treated Recovery From Aphasia - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. Modeling Treated Recovery From Aphasia The safety and scientific validity (...) Communication Disorders (NIDCD) Information provided by (Responsible Party): Julius Fridriksson, PhD, University of South Carolina Study Details Study Description Go to Brief Summary: Stroke is the leading cause of adult disability in the United States, and aphasia is common following a stroke to the left hemisphere of the brain. Aphasia therapy can improve aphasia recover; however, very little is known about how different patients respond to different types of treatments. The purpose of this study

2018 Clinical Trials

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