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Aphasia

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141. Early-Onset Alzheimer Disease (EOAD) With Aphasia: A Case Report (PubMed)

Early-Onset Alzheimer Disease (EOAD) With Aphasia: A Case Report Background: Alzheimer's disease (AD) is traditionally subdivided into early onset (EOAD) and late onset (LOAD). EOAD has an onset before age 65 years and accounts for 1-5% of all cases. Two main presentation types of AD are familial and sporadic. Case presentation: The authors present the case of a 68-year-old retired white man, with a college level educational background. At 55 years of age, the patient presented cognitive (...) decline with short-term memory impairment and slowed, hesitant speech. At 57 years, he was unable to remember the way to work, exhibiting spatial disorientation. PET-CT: revealed hypometabolism and atrophy in the left temporal lobe and posterior region of the parietal lobes. Disease course: Evolving with difficulties in comprehension and sentence repetition over past 3 years and with global aphasia in past 6 months, beyond progressive memory impairment. Discussion: Possibly due to the young age

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2018 Frontiers in Psychiatry

142. The Role of Language Severity and Education in Explaining Performance on Object and Action Naming in Primary Progressive Aphasia (PubMed)

The Role of Language Severity and Education in Explaining Performance on Object and Action Naming in Primary Progressive Aphasia Despite the common assumption that atrophy in a certain brain area would compromise the function that it subserves, this is not always the case, especially in complex clinical syndromes such as primary progressive aphasia (PPA). Clinical and demographic information may contribute to PPA phenotypes and explain the manifested impairments better than atrophy

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2018 Frontiers in aging neuroscience

143. Structural, Microstructural, and Metabolic Alterations in Primary Progressive Aphasia Variants (PubMed)

Structural, Microstructural, and Metabolic Alterations in Primary Progressive Aphasia Variants Neuroimaging studies have described the brain alterations in primary progressive aphasia (PPA) variants (semantic, logopenic, nonfluent/agrammatic). However, few studies combined T1, FDG-PET, and diffusion MRI techniques to study atrophy, hypometabolism, and tract alterations across the three PPA main variants. We therefore explored a large early-stage cohort of semantic, logopenic and nonfluent (...) /agrammatic variants (N = 86) and of 23 matched healthy controls with anatomical MRI (cortical thickness), FDG PET (metabolism) and diffusion MRI (white matter tracts analyses), aiming at identifying cortical and sub-cortical brain alterations, and confronting these alterations across imaging modalities and aphasia variants. In the semantic variant, there was cortical thinning and hypometabolism in anterior temporal cortices, with left-hemisphere predominance, extending toward posterior temporal regions

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2018 Frontiers in neurology

144. Postseizure aphasia in Wernicke’s encephalopathy: a case report and review of literature (PubMed)

Postseizure aphasia in Wernicke’s encephalopathy: a case report and review of literature This case discusses the course of a woman with a history of epilepsy, alcohol use disorder, herpes simplex virus (HSV) encephalitis, and Wernicke encephalopathy (WE) who presented with altered mental status following approximately 48 hours of vomiting. After experiencing a tonic-clonic seizure in the emergency department, she developed a fluent aphasia. Aphasias are ordinarily attributed to structural (...) changes in the brain parenchyma, often from stroke, neoplasm, or infection. When the magnetic resonance imaging of brain failed to show changes that could explain her fluent aphasia, the neurology team consulted psychiatry to workup psychogenic aphasia. During an admission 9 months earlier, she had been diagnosed with HSV encephalitis and possible WE. There was a high degree of suspicion for recurrent HSV infection, intermittent focal seizure activity, postictal psychosis, pseudobulbar affect

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2018 Neuropsychiatric disease and treatment

145. Types of naming errors in chronic post-stroke aphasia are dissociated by dual stream axonal loss (PubMed)

Types of naming errors in chronic post-stroke aphasia are dissociated by dual stream axonal loss The types of errors during speech production can vary across individuals with chronic post-stroke aphasia, possibly due to the location and extent of brain damage. In this study, we evaluated the relationship between semantic vs. phonemic errors during confrontational naming, and their relationship with the degree of damage to ventral and dorsal white matter pathways extending beyond the necrotic

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2018 Scientific reports

146. Aphasia Recovery: When, How and Who to Treat? (PubMed)

Aphasia Recovery: When, How and Who to Treat? We now know that speech and language therapy (SALT) is effective in the rehabilitation of aphasia; however, there remains much individual variability in the response to interventions. So, what works for whom, when and how?This review evaluates the current evidence for the efficacy of predominantly impairment-focused aphasia interventions with respect to optimal dose, intensity, timing and distribution or spacing of treatment. We conclude (...) that sufficient dose of treatment is required to enable clinical gains and that e-therapies are a promising and practical way to achieve this goal. In addition, aphasia can be associated with other cognitive deficits and may lead to secondary effects such as low mood and social isolation. In order to personalise individual treatments to optimise recovery, we need to develop a greater understanding of the interactions between these factors.

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2018 Current neurology and neuroscience reports

147. Rehabilitating and Decelerating Language Loss in Primary Progressive Aphasia With tDCS Plus Language Therapy

Rehabilitating and Decelerating Language Loss in Primary Progressive Aphasia With tDCS Plus Language Therapy Rehabilitating and Decelerating Language Loss in Primary Progressive Aphasia With tDCS Plus Language Therapy - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (...) (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. Rehabilitating and Decelerating Language Loss in Primary Progressive Aphasia With tDCS Plus Language Therapy The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. of clinical studies and talk to your health care provider before participating. Read our for details. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier

2018 Clinical Trials

148. Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation vs Sham Stimulation to Treat Aphasia After Stroke: A Randomized Clinical Trial. (PubMed)

Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation vs Sham Stimulation to Treat Aphasia After Stroke: A Randomized Clinical Trial. Aphasia is a debilitating language disorder for which behavioral speech therapy is the most efficient treatment, but therapy outcomes are variable and full recovery is not always achieved. It remains unclear if adjunctive brain stimulation (anodal transcranial direct current stimulation [A-tDCS]) applied during aphasia therapy can improve outcomes.To examine the futility (...) a volunteer sample, and 89 patients were screened. Patients with long-term (>6 months) aphasia due to 1 previous left hemisphere stroke were enrolled. In comparing A-tDCS and sham tDCS, patients were matched based on site (University of South Carolina or Medical University of South Carolina), baseline age, type of aphasia, and aphasia severity.Outpatient speech therapy for 3 weeks (15 sessions, 45 minutes each) combined with either A-tDCS vs sham tDCS applied to preserved left temporal lobe regions.The

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2018 JAMA neurology

149. Functional characterization of a novel progranulin mutation in a patient with progressive nonfluent aphasia. (PubMed)

Functional characterization of a novel progranulin mutation in a patient with progressive nonfluent aphasia. Loss-of-function mutations in progranulin (PGRN) gene cause frontotemporal lobar degeneration. Here, we report a case of a 63-year-old woman with a 2-year history of speech impairment, diagnosed with a nonfluent variant of primary progressive aphasia, a subtype of frontotemporal lobar degeneration. In this patient, a novel heterozygous frameshift mutation, c.77delG, in exon 2 of PGRN

2018 Neurobiology of Aging

150. Experimental pain assessment in patients with poststroke aphasia. (PubMed)

Experimental pain assessment in patients with poststroke aphasia. To evaluate an observational-behavioral pain tool among individuals with acute poststroke aphasia.We performed a randomized, double-blind, controlled study of experimental pain assessment among 36 adult patients with acute poststroke aphasia. Patients were administered 3 levels of mechanical pain, including placebo. The behavioral responses were video recorded and then evaluated by 3 neurology nurses using the Pain Assessment (...) ) or placebo (p = 0.05). Overall interrater reliability by the Cronbach α was strong at 0.87, 0.94, and 0.96 for weights of 0, 2, and 4.5 lb, respectively. Pain-specific facial activation and negative valence were observed similarly in placebo and experimental pain groups.Among our cohort with acute poststroke aphasia, the PACSLAC-II was not able to overall differentiate patients experiencing experimental mechanical pain, although differences in those experiencing the strongest pain stimulus were

2018 Neurology

151. [<sup>18</sup>F]THK-5351 PET imaging in early-stage semantic variant primary progressive aphasia: a report of two cases and a literature review. (PubMed)

[18F]THK-5351 PET imaging in early-stage semantic variant primary progressive aphasia: a report of two cases and a literature review. Semantic variant primary progressive aphasia (svPPA) is a subtype of primary progressive aphasia characterized by two-way anomia and disturbance in word comprehension, with focal atrophy in the left temporal lobe. [18F]THK-5351 was originally developed to trace tau protein. However, it has recently been suggested that [18F]THK-5351 binds to monoamine

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2018 BMC Neurology

152. Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Presenting as Expressive Aphasia and Nonconvulsive Status Epilepticus (PubMed)

Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Presenting as Expressive Aphasia and Nonconvulsive Status Epilepticus Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), the most common form of human prion diseases, is a fatal condition with a mortality rate reaching 85% within one year of clinical presentation. CJD is characterized by rapidly progressive neurological deterioration in combination with typical electroencephalography (EEG) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings and positive cerebrospinal spinal fluid (CSF (...) ) analysis for 14-3-3 proteins. Unfortunately, CJD can have atypical clinical and radiological presentation in approximately 10% of cases, thus making the diagnosis often challenging. We report a rare clinical presentation of sporadic CJD (sCJD) with combination of both expressive aphasia and nonconvulsive status epilepticus. This patient presented with slurred speech, confusion, myoclonus, headaches, and vertigo and succumbed to his disease within ten weeks of initial onset of his symptoms. He had

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2018 Case reports in critical care

153. A Longitudinal Study of a Chinese Man Presenting with Non-Fluent/Agrammatic Variant of Primary Progressive Aphasia (PubMed)

A Longitudinal Study of a Chinese Man Presenting with Non-Fluent/Agrammatic Variant of Primary Progressive Aphasia Primary progressive aphasia (PPA) is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by declining language ability. However, the difficulty in defining the central clinical features in its earliest stage and establishing the dynamics of its progression has led to controversy. We report a 71-year-old man with Han language suffering from non-fluent/agrammatic variant of PPA but presenting

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2018 Frontiers in neurology

154. Crossed Aphasia as a Manifestation of Glioblastoma (PubMed)

Crossed Aphasia as a Manifestation of Glioblastoma Language and speech function is commonly accepted to be a heavily lateralized function. Greater than 95% of right-handed individuals have left hemispheric dominance for language, and reports in the literature of crossed aphasia (language deficits in a right-handed individual from right-sided pathology) are scant. We report the case of a 52-year-old woman presenting with crossed aphasia from a right temporal glioblastoma. We then expand (...) on a discussion of crossed aphasia in the setting of brain tumors.

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2018 Cureus

155. Abnormal language-related oscillatory responses in primary progressive aphasia (PubMed)

Abnormal language-related oscillatory responses in primary progressive aphasia Patients with Primary Progressive Aphasia (PPA) may react to linguistic stimuli differently than healthy controls, reflecting degeneration of language networks and engagement of compensatory mechanisms. We used magnetoencephalography (MEG) to evaluate oscillatory neural responses in sentence comprehension, in patients with PPA and age-matched controls. Participants viewed sentences containing semantically

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2018 NeuroImage : Clinical

156. Links Between Short-Term Memory and Word Retrieval in Aphasia (PubMed)

Links Between Short-Term Memory and Word Retrieval in Aphasia This study explored the relationship between anomia and verbal short-term memory (STM) in the context of an interactive activation language processing model.Twenty-four individuals with aphasia and reduced STM spans (i.e., impaired immediate serial recall of words) completed a picture-naming task and a word pair repetition task (a measure of verbal STM). Correlations between verbal STM and word retrieval errors made on the picture

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2018 American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology

157. The Relationship Between Confrontation Naming and Story Gist Production in Aphasia (PubMed)

The Relationship Between Confrontation Naming and Story Gist Production in Aphasia The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between picture naming performance and the ability to communicate the gist, or essential elements, of a story. We also sought to determine if this relationship varied according to Western Aphasia Battery-Revised (WAB-R; Kertesz, 2007) aphasia subtype.Demographic information, test scores, and transcripts of 258 individuals with aphasia completing 3 (...) narrative tasks were retrieved from the AphasiaBank database. Narratives were subjected to a main concept analysis to determine gist production. A correlation analysis was used to investigate the relationship between naming scores and main concept production for the whole group of persons with aphasia and for WAB-R subtypes separately.We found strong correlations between naming test scores and narrative gist production for the large sample of persons with aphasia. However, the strength

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2018 American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology

158. Response Time Inconsistencies in Object and Action Naming in Anomic Aphasia (PubMed)

Response Time Inconsistencies in Object and Action Naming in Anomic Aphasia The effect of repeated naming on both object and action picture naming in individuals with anomic aphasia is explored. We asked whether repeatedly naming the same items leads to improved accuracy and reduced response latency.Ten individuals with anomic aphasia and 6 healthy adults, 3 young and 3 old, named a set of 27 object pictures and a set of 27 action pictures presented 1 at a time on a computer screen. We examined (...) accuracy and response times (RTs) across the 2 blocks of 10 repeated trials.Results demonstrated higher accuracy and faster RTs for object than for action naming for all participants, with lower accuracy rates and slower RTs for the people with aphasia (PWA) compared with the healthy individuals, and diverging patterns of change across trials. Unlike the healthy participants, whose RTs decreased across trials, PWA continued to demonstrate variability in response latencies across the trials.Our

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2018 American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology

159. Describing Phonological Paraphasias in Three Variants of Primary Progressive Aphasia (PubMed)

Describing Phonological Paraphasias in Three Variants of Primary Progressive Aphasia The purpose of this study was to describe the linguistic environment of phonological paraphasias in 3 variants of primary progressive aphasia (semantic, logopenic, and nonfluent) and to describe the profiles of paraphasia production for each of these variants.Discourse samples of 26 individuals diagnosed with primary progressive aphasia were investigated for phonological paraphasias using the criteria

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2018 American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology

160. The Effect of Speech Repetition Rate on Neural Activation in Healthy Adults: Implications for Treatment of Aphasia and Other Fluency Disorders (PubMed)

The Effect of Speech Repetition Rate on Neural Activation in Healthy Adults: Implications for Treatment of Aphasia and Other Fluency Disorders Functional imaging studies have provided insight into the effect of rate on production of syllables, pseudowords, and naturalistic speech, but the influence of rate on repetition of commonly-used words/phrases suitable for therapeutic use merits closer examination. Aim: To identify speech-motor regions responsive to rate and test the hypothesis (...) and their sensitivity to changes in rate may play an important role in interventions for nonfluent aphasia and other fluency disorders, particularly when right-hemisphere structures are the sole remaining pathway for production of meaningful speech.

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2018 Frontiers in human neuroscience

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