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Aphasia

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121. Effects of a Tablet-Based Home Practice Program With Telepractice on Treatment Outcomes in Chronic Aphasia (PubMed)

Effects of a Tablet-Based Home Practice Program With Telepractice on Treatment Outcomes in Chronic Aphasia The aim of this study was to determine if a tablet-based home practice program with weekly telepractice support could enable long-term maintenance of recent treatment gains and foster new language gains in poststroke aphasia.In a pre-post group study of home practice outcomes, 21 individuals with chronic aphasia were examined before and after a 6-month home practice phase and again (...) , such that individuals with the most severe aphasia made and maintained fewer gains. There was a negative relationship between the amount of training required for iPad proficiency and improvements on practiced and unpracticed pictures and a positive relationship between practice compliance and same improvements.Unsupervised home practice with weekly video teleconferencing support is effective. This study demonstrates that even individuals with chronic severe aphasia, including those with no prior smart device

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2018 Journal of speech, language, and hearing research : JSLHR

122. Postseizure aphasia in Wernicke’s encephalopathy: a case report and review of literature (PubMed)

Postseizure aphasia in Wernicke’s encephalopathy: a case report and review of literature This case discusses the course of a woman with a history of epilepsy, alcohol use disorder, herpes simplex virus (HSV) encephalitis, and Wernicke encephalopathy (WE) who presented with altered mental status following approximately 48 hours of vomiting. After experiencing a tonic-clonic seizure in the emergency department, she developed a fluent aphasia. Aphasias are ordinarily attributed to structural (...) changes in the brain parenchyma, often from stroke, neoplasm, or infection. When the magnetic resonance imaging of brain failed to show changes that could explain her fluent aphasia, the neurology team consulted psychiatry to workup psychogenic aphasia. During an admission 9 months earlier, she had been diagnosed with HSV encephalitis and possible WE. There was a high degree of suspicion for recurrent HSV infection, intermittent focal seizure activity, postictal psychosis, pseudobulbar affect

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2018 Neuropsychiatric disease and treatment

123. Types of naming errors in chronic post-stroke aphasia are dissociated by dual stream axonal loss (PubMed)

Types of naming errors in chronic post-stroke aphasia are dissociated by dual stream axonal loss The types of errors during speech production can vary across individuals with chronic post-stroke aphasia, possibly due to the location and extent of brain damage. In this study, we evaluated the relationship between semantic vs. phonemic errors during confrontational naming, and their relationship with the degree of damage to ventral and dorsal white matter pathways extending beyond the necrotic

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2018 Scientific reports

124. Early-Onset Alzheimer Disease (EOAD) With Aphasia: A Case Report (PubMed)

Early-Onset Alzheimer Disease (EOAD) With Aphasia: A Case Report Background: Alzheimer's disease (AD) is traditionally subdivided into early onset (EOAD) and late onset (LOAD). EOAD has an onset before age 65 years and accounts for 1-5% of all cases. Two main presentation types of AD are familial and sporadic. Case presentation: The authors present the case of a 68-year-old retired white man, with a college level educational background. At 55 years of age, the patient presented cognitive (...) decline with short-term memory impairment and slowed, hesitant speech. At 57 years, he was unable to remember the way to work, exhibiting spatial disorientation. PET-CT: revealed hypometabolism and atrophy in the left temporal lobe and posterior region of the parietal lobes. Disease course: Evolving with difficulties in comprehension and sentence repetition over past 3 years and with global aphasia in past 6 months, beyond progressive memory impairment. Discussion: Possibly due to the young age

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2018 Frontiers in Psychiatry

125. Multimodal Communication in Aphasia: Perception and Production of Co-speech Gestures During Face-to-Face Conversation (PubMed)

Multimodal Communication in Aphasia: Perception and Production of Co-speech Gestures During Face-to-Face Conversation The role of nonverbal communication in patients with post-stroke language impairment (aphasia) is not yet fully understood. This study investigated how aphasic patients perceive and produce co-speech gestures during face-to-face interaction, and whether distinct brain lesions would predict the frequency of spontaneous co-speech gesturing. For this purpose, we recorded samples (...) of conversations in patients with aphasia and healthy participants. Gesture perception was assessed by means of a head-mounted eye-tracking system, and the produced co-speech gestures were coded according to a linguistic classification system. The main results are that meaning-laden gestures (e.g., iconic gestures representing object shapes) are more likely to attract visual attention than meaningless hand movements, and that patients with aphasia are more likely to fixate co-speech gestures overall than

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2018 Frontiers in human neuroscience

126. Aphasia Recovery: When, How and Who to Treat? (PubMed)

Aphasia Recovery: When, How and Who to Treat? We now know that speech and language therapy (SALT) is effective in the rehabilitation of aphasia; however, there remains much individual variability in the response to interventions. So, what works for whom, when and how?This review evaluates the current evidence for the efficacy of predominantly impairment-focused aphasia interventions with respect to optimal dose, intensity, timing and distribution or spacing of treatment. We conclude (...) that sufficient dose of treatment is required to enable clinical gains and that e-therapies are a promising and practical way to achieve this goal. In addition, aphasia can be associated with other cognitive deficits and may lead to secondary effects such as low mood and social isolation. In order to personalise individual treatments to optimise recovery, we need to develop a greater understanding of the interactions between these factors.

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2018 Current neurology and neuroscience reports

127. Relative contributions of lesion location and lesion size to predictions of varied language deficits in post-stroke aphasia (PubMed)

Relative contributions of lesion location and lesion size to predictions of varied language deficits in post-stroke aphasia Despite the widespread use of lesion-symptom mapping (LSM) techniques to study associations between location of brain damage and language deficits, the prediction of language deficits from lesion location remains a substantial challenge. The present study examined several factors which may impact lesion-symptom prediction by (1) testing the relative predictive advantage (...) lesion location. For both VLSM and SCCAN, overall aphasia severity (Western Aphasia Battery Aphasia Quotient) and object naming deficits were primarily predicted by lesion size, whereas deficits in Speech Production and Speech Recognition were better predicted by a combination of lesion size and location. The implementation of both VLSM and SCCAN raises important considerations regarding controlling for lesion size in lesion-symptom mapping analyses. These findings suggest that lesion-symptom

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2018 NeuroImage : Clinical

128. CNKSR2 mutation causes the X-linked epilepsy-aphasia syndrome: A case report and review of literature (PubMed)

CNKSR2 mutation causes the X-linked epilepsy-aphasia syndrome: A case report and review of literature The mutation in CNKSR2 leads to a broad spectrum of phenotypic variability and manifests as an X-linked intellectual disability. However, we reported that the male patient in this study not only had intellectual disability but also epileptic seizures. In addition, there were progressive language impairment, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and autism. Electroencephalograms showed (...) continuous spike-and-wave during sleep. Genetic testing revealed a de novo mutation of the CNKSR2 gene (c.2185C>T, p.Arg729Ter) in the child that was not detected in the parents. Therefore, the child was diagnosed with X-linked epilepsy aphasia syndrome. Deletion of the CNKSR2 gene has been rarely reported in epilepsy aphasia syndrome, but no de novo mutation has been found in this gene. This report not only adds to the spectrum of epilepsy aphasia syndrome but also helps clinicians in diagnosis

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2018 World journal of clinical cases

129. The Role of Language Severity and Education in Explaining Performance on Object and Action Naming in Primary Progressive Aphasia (PubMed)

The Role of Language Severity and Education in Explaining Performance on Object and Action Naming in Primary Progressive Aphasia Despite the common assumption that atrophy in a certain brain area would compromise the function that it subserves, this is not always the case, especially in complex clinical syndromes such as primary progressive aphasia (PPA). Clinical and demographic information may contribute to PPA phenotypes and explain the manifested impairments better than atrophy

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2018 Frontiers in aging neuroscience

130. Robotic Arm Rehabilitation in Chronic Stroke Patients With Aphasia May Promote Speech and Language Recovery (but Effect Is Not Enhanced by Supplementary tDCS) (PubMed)

Robotic Arm Rehabilitation in Chronic Stroke Patients With Aphasia May Promote Speech and Language Recovery (but Effect Is Not Enhanced by Supplementary tDCS) Objective: This study aimed to determine the extent to which robotic arm rehabilitation for chronic stroke may promote recovery of speech and language function in individuals with aphasia. Methods: We prospectively enrolled 17 individuals from a hemiparesis rehabilitation study pairing intensive robot assisted therapy with sham or active (...) tDCS and evaluated their speech (N = 17) and language (N = 9) performance before and after a 12-week (36 session) treatment regimen. Performance changes were evaluated with paired t-tests comparing pre- and post-test measures. There was no speech therapy included in the treatment protocol. Results: Overall, the individuals significantly improved on measures of motor speech production from pre-test to post-test. Of the subset who performed language testing (N = 9), overall aphasia severity

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2018 Frontiers in neurology

131. Sensitivity of Speech Output to Delayed Auditory Feedback in Primary Progressive Aphasias (PubMed)

Sensitivity of Speech Output to Delayed Auditory Feedback in Primary Progressive Aphasias Delayed auditory feedback (DAF) is a classical paradigm for probing sensori-motor interactions in speech output and has been studied in various disorders associated with speech dysfluency and aphasia. However, little information is available concerning the effects of DAF on degenerating language networks in primary progressive aphasia: the paradigmatic "language-led dementias." Here we studied two forms (...) of speech output (reading aloud and propositional speech) under natural listening conditions (no feedback delay) and under DAF at 200 ms, in a cohort of 19 patients representing all major primary progressive aphasia syndromes vs. healthy older individuals and patients with other canonical dementia syndromes (typical Alzheimer's disease and behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia). Healthy controls and most syndromic groups showed a quantitatively or qualitatively similar profile of reduced speech

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2018 Frontiers in neurology

132. Single-word comprehension deficits in the nonfluent variant of primary progressive aphasia (PubMed)

Single-word comprehension deficits in the nonfluent variant of primary progressive aphasia A subset of patients with the nonfluent variant of primary progressive aphasia (PPA) exhibit concomitant single-word comprehension problems, constituting a 'mixed variant' phenotype. This phenotype is rare and currently not fully characterized. The aim of this study was twofold: to assess the prevalence and nature of single-word comprehension problems in the nonfluent variant and to study multimodal

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2018 Alzheimer's research & therapy

133. Impairments in the Comprehension of Indoor Object/Body Part Words and Family Relationships in a Patient with Aphasia due to Cerebral Infarction of the Left Parietal and Temporal Lobes (PubMed)

Impairments in the Comprehension of Indoor Object/Body Part Words and Family Relationships in a Patient with Aphasia due to Cerebral Infarction of the Left Parietal and Temporal Lobes The present report discusses the case of a 73-year-old right-handed man who exhibited signs of aphasia caused by cerebral infarction in the left temporoparietal region. Neuropsychological evaluation revealed that he had difficulty in comprehending words related to indoor objects, body parts, and family

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2018 Case reports in neurology

134. Diagnostic utility of FDG-PET in the differential diagnosis between different forms of primary progressive aphasia (PubMed)

Diagnostic utility of FDG-PET in the differential diagnosis between different forms of primary progressive aphasia A joint effort of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM) and the European Academy of Neurology (EAN) aims at clinical guidance for the use of FDG-PET in neurodegenerative diseases. This paper addresses the diagnostic utility of FDG-PET over clinical/neuropsychological assessment in the differentiation of the three forms of primary progressive aphasia (PPA).Seven

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2018 European Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging

135. Retained capacity for perceptual learning of degraded speech in primary progressive aphasia and Alzheimer’s disease (PubMed)

Retained capacity for perceptual learning of degraded speech in primary progressive aphasia and Alzheimer’s disease Processing of degraded speech is a promising model for understanding communication under challenging listening conditions, core auditory deficits and residual capacity for perceptual learning and cerebral plasticity in major dementias.We compared the processing of sine-wave-degraded speech in 26 patients with primary progressive aphasia (non-fluent, semantic, and logopenic (...) variants), 10 patients with typical Alzheimer's disease and 17 healthy control subjects. Participants were required to identify sine-wave words that were more predictable (three-digit numbers) or less predictable (place names). The change in identification performance within each session indexed perceptual learning. Neuroanatomical associations of degraded speech processing were assessed using voxel-based morphometry.Patients with non-fluent and logopenic progressive aphasia and typical Alzheimer's

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2018 Alzheimer's research & therapy

136. Distinct [18F]THK5351 binding patterns in primary progressive aphasia variants (PubMed)

Distinct [18F]THK5351 binding patterns in primary progressive aphasia variants To assess the binding of the PET tracer [18F]THK5351 in patients with different primary progressive aphasia (PPA) variants and its correlation with clinical deficits. The majority of patients with nonfluent variant (NFV) and logopenic variant (LV) PPA have underlying tauopathy of the frontotemporal lobar or Alzheimer disease type, respectively, while patients with the semantic variant (SV) have predominantly

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2018 European Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging

137. Thalamic bacterial abscess presenting with hemiparesis and expressive aphasia (PubMed)

Thalamic bacterial abscess presenting with hemiparesis and expressive aphasia Brain abscesses are relative rare in the developing world, with an incidence of 2% of all space occupying lesions. Deep-seated abscesses such as thalamic and basal ganglia abscesses are much rarer than abscesses in other locations of the brain, comprising 1.3-6% of all brain abscesses. These abscesses may present with hemiparesis, and subcortical aphasia has only been reported in a few cases throughout the literature (...) . Here we present and discuss a case of thalamic brain abscess caused by S. anginosus that presented with subcortical aphasia.

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2018 IDCases

138. Lesion mapping in acute stroke aphasia and its implications for recovery (PubMed)

Lesion mapping in acute stroke aphasia and its implications for recovery Patients with stroke offer a unique window into understanding human brain function. Mapping stroke lesions poses several challenges due to the complexity of the lesion anatomy and the mechanisms causing local and remote disruption on brain networks. In this prospective longitudinal study, we compare standard and advanced approaches to white matter lesion mapping applied to acute stroke patients with aphasia. Eighteen (...) patients with acute left hemisphere stroke were recruited and scanned within two weeks from symptom onset. Aphasia assessment was performed at baseline and six-month follow-up. Structural and diffusion MRI contrasts indicated an area of maximum overlap in the anterior external/extreme capsule with diffusion images showing a larger overlap extending into posterior perisylvian regions. Anatomical predictors of recovery included damage to ipsilesional tracts (as shown by both structural and diffusion

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2018 Neuropsychologia

139. CSF Biomarkers of Neurodegeneration in Progressive Non-fluent Aphasia and Other Forms of Frontotemporal Dementia: Clues for Pathomechanisms? (PubMed)

CSF Biomarkers of Neurodegeneration in Progressive Non-fluent Aphasia and Other Forms of Frontotemporal Dementia: Clues for Pathomechanisms? Frontotemporal Dementia (FTD) encompasses distinct pathophysiologically heterogenous disorders with different genetic and cellular disease mechanisms. The objective of this study is to compare the constellation of biomarkers of neurodegeneration in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) to the FTD type categorized by clinical symptoms. We investigated the levels (...) of Phospho181-tau, Total-tau, Beta-amyloid1-42, Neurofilament light chain, and Progranulin in the CSF of n = 99 FTD patients regarding to the different subtypes of FTD, including semantic dementia (SD), progressive non-fluent aphasia (PNFA), behavioral variant FTD (bvFTD). We compared these groups to patients without neurodegenerative disorders and another cohort encompassing tauopathies with distinct clinical syndromes (Cortico basal syndrome and progressive supranuclear palsy) and logopenic PNFA (lPPA

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2018 Frontiers in neurology

140. Conduction Aphasia as Initial Manifestation of Tuberculous Meningitis (PubMed)

Conduction Aphasia as Initial Manifestation of Tuberculous Meningitis Conduction aphasia being the arcuate fasciculus of the site of structural injury is a speech disorder characterized by fluent, spontaneous speech and paraphasias, intact auditory comprehension, and limited repetition. One of the causes of stroke in young adults is the Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) infection, which may cause cerebral ischemia secondary to artery obliteration. In this case report, we present a previously (...) healthy 24-year-old woman that presented with a sudden onset of aphasia; MTB was identified as the etiological agent. Tuberculous meningitis (TBM) has a wide range of clinical manifestations with aphasia being one of the rarest forms of initial presentation.

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2018 Cureus

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