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Aphasia

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101. Melodic intonation therapy in post-stroke nonfluent aphasia: a randomized pilot trial. (PubMed)

Melodic intonation therapy in post-stroke nonfluent aphasia: a randomized pilot trial. To collect data to estimate the sample size of a definitive randomized controlled trial to evaluate the effects of Melodic Intonation Therapy in post-stroke nonfluent aphasia.A randomized, crossover, interventional pilot trial.Departments of Neurology and Rehabilitation from a university general hospital.Stroke survivors with post-stroke nonfluent aphasia.Patients randomized to group 1 had treatment (...) with Melodic Intonation Therapy first (12 sessions over six weeks) followed by no treatment; the patients in group 2 started active treatment between three and six months after their inclusion in the study, serving as waiting list controls for the first phase.The Communicative Activity Log (CAL) questionnaire and the Boston Diagnostic Aphasia Examination (BDAE) were evaluated at baseline, and at six and 12 weeks.Twenty patients were included. Four of the patients allocated to group 2 crossed over to group

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2018 Clinical rehabilitation Controlled trial quality: predicted high

102. tDCS over the motor cortex improves lexical retrieval of action words in poststroke aphasia. (PubMed)

tDCS over the motor cortex improves lexical retrieval of action words in poststroke aphasia. One-third of stroke survivors worldwide suffer from aphasia. Speech and language therapy (SLT) is considered effective in treating aphasia, but because of time constraints, improvements are often limited. Noninvasive brain stimulation is a promising adjuvant strategy to facilitate SLT. However, stroke might render "classical" language regions ineffective as stimulation sites. Recent work showed (...) the effectiveness of motor cortex stimulation together with intensive naming therapy to improve outcomes in aphasia (Meinzer et al. 2016). Although that study highlights the involvement of the motor cortex, the functional aspects by which it influences language remain unclear. In the present study, we focus on the role of motor cortex in language, investigating its functional involvement in access to specific lexico-semantic (object vs. action relatedness) information in poststroke aphasia. To this end, we

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2018 Journal of neurophysiology Controlled trial quality: uncertain

103. Transcranial Cerebellar Direct Current Stimulation Enhances Verb Generation but Not Verb Naming in Poststroke Aphasia. (PubMed)

Transcranial Cerebellar Direct Current Stimulation Enhances Verb Generation but Not Verb Naming in Poststroke Aphasia. Although the role of the cerebellum in motor function is well recognized, its involvement in the lexical domain remains to be further elucidated. Indeed, it has not yet been clarified whether the cerebellum is a language structure per se or whether it contributes to language processing when other cognitive components (e.g., cognitive effort, working memory) are required (...) among the two conditions. We hypothesize that cerebellar tDCS is a viable tool for recovery from aphasia but only when the language task, such as verb generation, also demands the activation of nonlinguistic strategies.

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2018 Journal of cognitive neuroscience Controlled trial quality: uncertain

104. Improving Electronic Written Communication in Aphasia

Improving Electronic Written Communication in Aphasia Improving Electronic Written Communication in Aphasia - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. Improving Electronic Written Communication (...) in Aphasia (T-WRITE) The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. of clinical studies and talk to your health care provider before participating. Read our for details. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03773419 Recruitment Status : Recruiting First Posted : December 12, 2018 Last Update Posted : December 12, 2018 See Sponsor: Shirley Ryan AbilityLab

2018 Clinical Trials

105. Etiology of language network changes during recovery of aphasia after stroke (PubMed)

Etiology of language network changes during recovery of aphasia after stroke Knowledge of spatiotemporal patterns of language network changes may help in predicting outcome in aphasic stroke patients. Here we assessed language function and performed functional MRI four times during one year to measure language network activation and cerebrovascular reactivity (with breath-holding) in twelve left-hemispheric stroke patients, of whom two dropped out before the final measurement, and eight age (...) inferior frontal gyrus were primarily related to differences in vascular reactivity. Furthermore, several language-activation changes could not be linked to alterations in language proficiency nor vascular reactivity, and were assumed to be caused by unspecified intersession variability. In conclusion, early functional neuroimaging improves outcome prediction of aphasia after stroke. Controlling for cerebrovascular reactivity and unspecified intersession variability may result in more accurate

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2018 Scientific reports

106. Noun and verb processing in aphasia: Behavioural profiles and neural correlates (PubMed)

Noun and verb processing in aphasia: Behavioural profiles and neural correlates The behavioural and neural processes underpinning different word classes, particularly nouns and verbs, have been a long-standing area of interest in psycholinguistic, neuropsychology and aphasiology research. This topic has theoretical implications concerning the organisation of the language system, as well as clinical consequences related to the management of patients with language deficits. Research findings (...) , in a relatively large cohort of 48 patients with chronic post-stroke aphasia. A data-driven approach, principal component analysis (PCA), was also used to determine how noun and verb production and comprehension were related to the patients' underlying fundamental language domains. The results revealed no performance differences between noun and verb production and comprehension once matched on multiple psycholinguistic features including, most critically, imageability. Interestingly, the noun-verb

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2018 NeuroImage : Clinical

107. The Association Between Post-stroke Depression, Aphasia, and Physical Independence in Stroke Patients at 3-Month Follow-Up (PubMed)

The Association Between Post-stroke Depression, Aphasia, and Physical Independence in Stroke Patients at 3-Month Follow-Up Objective: Few studies have examined the association between post-stroke depression (PSD), aphasia, and physical independence in Chinese patients. This study investigated the above association in stroke patients in China at 3-month follow-up. Methods: Altogether 270 patients within 14 days after ischemic stroke were recruited and followed up at 3 months. PSD, aphasia (...) , and physical functional status were measured using the Stroke Aphasia Depression Questionnaire (SADQ), Western Aphasia Battery (WAB), and modified Rankin Scale (mRS), respectively. Patients with mRS total score >2 were considered as having "physical dependence." Results: Out of 248 patients at 3-month follow up, 119 (48%) were rated as having physical dependence. Multiple logistic regression analyses revealed that female (p = 0.04; OR = 2.2; 95% CI: 1.0-5.1), more severe stroke at admission (p < 0.01

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2018 Frontiers in Psychiatry

108. Relating resting-state hemodynamic changes to the variable language profiles in post-stroke aphasia (PubMed)

Relating resting-state hemodynamic changes to the variable language profiles in post-stroke aphasia Linking both structural lesions and the functional integrity of remaining brain tissue to patients' behavioural profile may be critical in discovering the limits of behavioural recovery post stroke. In the present study, we explored the relationship between temporal hemodynamic changes and language performance in chronic post-stroke aphasia. We collected detailed language and neuropsychological (...) data for 66 patients with chronic (>1 year) post-stroke aphasia. We used principal component analysis to extract their core language-neuropsychological features. From resting-state fMRI scans in 35 patients, we calculated the lag in the time-course of the intact brain voxels in each patient. Finally, variation across the language-cognitive factors was related to both the patients' structural damage and the time-course changes in each patient's intact tissue. Phonological abilities were correlated

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2018 NeuroImage : Clinical

109. Clinical, Anatomical, and Pathological Features in the Three Variants of Primary Progressive Aphasia: A Review (PubMed)

Clinical, Anatomical, and Pathological Features in the Three Variants of Primary Progressive Aphasia: A Review Primary progressive aphasias (PPA) are neurodegenerative diseases clinically characterized by an early and relatively isolated language impairment. Three main clinical variants, namely the nonfluent/agrammatic variant (nfvPPA), the semantic variant (svPPA), and the logopenic variant (lvPPA) have been described, each with specific linguistic/cognitive deficits, corresponding anatomical

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2018 Frontiers in neurology

110. Speech and language therapists’ perspectives of therapeutic alliance construction and maintenance in aphasia rehabilitation post‐stroke (PubMed)

Speech and language therapists’ perspectives of therapeutic alliance construction and maintenance in aphasia rehabilitation post‐stroke Therapeutic alliance refers to the interactional and relational processes operating during therapeutic interventions. It has been shown to be a strong determinant of treatment efficacy in psychotherapy, and evidence is emerging from a range of healthcare and medical disciplines to suggest that the construct of therapeutic alliance may in fact be a variable (...) component of treatment outcome, engagement and satisfaction. Although this construct appears to be highly relevant to aphasia rehabilitation, no research to date has attempted to explore this phenomenon and thus consider its potential utility as a mechanism for change.To explore speech and language therapists' perceptions and experiences of developing and maintaining therapeutic alliances in aphasia rehabilitation post-stroke.Twenty-two, in-depth, semi-structured interviews were conducted with speech

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2018 International Journal of Language & Communication Disorders

111. Comparison of two configurations of transcranial direct current stimulation for aphasia treatment. (PubMed)

Comparison of two configurations of transcranial direct current stimulation for aphasia treatment. To compare 2 configurations of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) for treatment of aphasia.Randomized cross-over study.Patients with chronic post-stroke aphasia (n = 13).tDCS was combined with word-finding therapy in 3 single sessions. In session 1, sham-tDCS/pseudo-stimulation was applied. In sessions 2 and 3, 2 active configurations were provided in random order: anodal tDCS over (...) active tDCS; either in the l-IFG condition (n = 4; 31%) or in both the l-IFG and l-STG conditions (n = 2; 15%). On the untrained items there was no improvement (median = 0%; interquartile range  = 0-0).This randomized cross-over single-session protocol to determine an optimal tDCS configuration for treatment of aphasia suggests that only performance on trained items can be used as guidance for configuration, and that it is relevant for half of the patients. For this subgroup, the l-IFG configuration

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2018 Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine Controlled trial quality: uncertain

112. Further Evidence of the Positive Influence of Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation on Speech and Language in Patients with Aphasia after Stroke: Results from a Double-Blind Intervention with Sham Condition. (PubMed)

Further Evidence of the Positive Influence of Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation on Speech and Language in Patients with Aphasia after Stroke: Results from a Double-Blind Intervention with Sham Condition. After a stroke, up to 20% of patients suffer from aphasia. The preferred treatment for stroke-related aphasia (SRA) is regular speech and language training (SLT). In the present study, we investigated to what extent adjuvant repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) might (...) enhance recovery. While there is growing evidence of the positive effect of adjuvant rTMS on aphasia, no study has yet been based on an Iranian sample.A total of 12 patients (mean age: 55 years; right-handed; 7 women) underwent treatment for SRA 1 month after stroke. The standard treatment consisted of regular 45-min SLT sessions 5 times a week for 2 consecutive weeks. Additionally, patients were randomly assigned either to adjuvant rTMS (5 times a week for 30 min) or to a sham condition (5 times

2018 Neuropsychobiology Controlled trial quality: uncertain

113. Development and Feasibility Analysis of Verbal Expressive Skills Management Programme (VESMP) for Patients With Broca Aphasia

Development and Feasibility Analysis of Verbal Expressive Skills Management Programme (VESMP) for Patients With Broca Aphasia Development and Feasibility Analysis of Verbal Expressive Skills Management Programme (VESMP) for Patients With Broca Aphasia - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached (...) the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. Development and Feasibility Analysis of Verbal Expressive Skills Management Programme (VESMP) for Patients With Broca Aphasia (VESMP) The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our for details. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03699605 Recruitment Status

2018 Clinical Trials

114. Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation and Constraint Induced Language Therapy for Chronic Aphasia

Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation and Constraint Induced Language Therapy for Chronic Aphasia Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation and Constraint Induced Language Therapy for Chronic Aphasia - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one (...) or more studies before adding more. Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation and Constraint Induced Language Therapy for Chronic Aphasia The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. of clinical studies and talk to your health care provider before participating. Read our for details. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03651700 Recruitment Status : Recruiting

2018 Clinical Trials

115. Tablet-based Aphasia Therapy in the Acute Phase After Stroke

Tablet-based Aphasia Therapy in the Acute Phase After Stroke Tablet-based Aphasia Therapy in the Acute Phase After Stroke - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. Tablet-based Aphasia Therapy (...) , Ghent Information provided by (Responsible Party): Neurologie, University Hospital, Ghent Study Details Study Description Go to Brief Summary: As aphasia is one of the most common and disabling disorders following stroke, in many cases resolving in long-term deficits, it is now thought that intensive aphasia therapy is effective, even in the chronic phase following stroke. However, as intensive aphasia rehabilitation is difficult to achieve in clinical practice, tablet-based aphasia therapies

2018 Clinical Trials

116. Rehabilitating and Decelerating Language Loss in Primary Progressive Aphasia With tDCS Plus Language Therapy

Rehabilitating and Decelerating Language Loss in Primary Progressive Aphasia With tDCS Plus Language Therapy Rehabilitating and Decelerating Language Loss in Primary Progressive Aphasia With tDCS Plus Language Therapy - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (...) (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. Rehabilitating and Decelerating Language Loss in Primary Progressive Aphasia With tDCS Plus Language Therapy The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. of clinical studies and talk to your health care provider before participating. Read our for details. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier

2018 Clinical Trials

117. Structural, Microstructural, and Metabolic Alterations in Primary Progressive Aphasia Variants (PubMed)

Structural, Microstructural, and Metabolic Alterations in Primary Progressive Aphasia Variants Neuroimaging studies have described the brain alterations in primary progressive aphasia (PPA) variants (semantic, logopenic, nonfluent/agrammatic). However, few studies combined T1, FDG-PET, and diffusion MRI techniques to study atrophy, hypometabolism, and tract alterations across the three PPA main variants. We therefore explored a large early-stage cohort of semantic, logopenic and nonfluent (...) /agrammatic variants (N = 86) and of 23 matched healthy controls with anatomical MRI (cortical thickness), FDG PET (metabolism) and diffusion MRI (white matter tracts analyses), aiming at identifying cortical and sub-cortical brain alterations, and confronting these alterations across imaging modalities and aphasia variants. In the semantic variant, there was cortical thinning and hypometabolism in anterior temporal cortices, with left-hemisphere predominance, extending toward posterior temporal regions

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2018 Frontiers in neurology

118. Electrical brain stimulation in different variants of primary progressive aphasia: A randomized clinical trial (PubMed)

Electrical brain stimulation in different variants of primary progressive aphasia: A randomized clinical trial Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) has been recently shown to improve language outcomes in primary progressive aphasia (PPA) but most studies are small and the influence of PPA variant is unknown.Thirty-six patients with PPA participated in a randomized, sham-controlled, double-blind, within-subject crossover design for 15 daily sessions of stimulation coupled with written

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2018 Alzheimer's & dementia : translational research & clinical interventions Controlled trial quality: uncertain

119. Exploring the efficacy of melodic intonation therapy with Broca’s aphasia in Arabic (PubMed)

Exploring the efficacy of melodic intonation therapy with Broca’s aphasia in Arabic  Even though the efficacy of melodic intonation therapy (MIT) with persons with aphasia (PWA) has been explored in different languages, the efficacy of MIT with Arabic-speaking PWA has never been explored. Aims: To explore the efficacy of MIT, adapted to Arabic, in promoting the expressive abilities of a 70-year-old Jordanian Arabic-speaking male subject with severe Broca's aphasia 3 months post-onset. Methods (...) : An 8-week MIT therapy programme with tapping (1.5 h daily, 6 days a week) was used in a multiple baseline design across two types of trained phrases (i.e. automatic and self-generated phrases). Outcome measures included accuracy of production of trained (at the end of each session) and untrained phrases (at the end of each week). Pre- and post-treatment measures used, were the bilingual aphasia test, the American Speech-Language Hearing Association Functional Assessment of Communicative Skills

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2018 The South African Journal of Communication Disorders

120. The effect of tDCS on functional connectivity in primary progressive aphasia (PubMed)

The effect of tDCS on functional connectivity in primary progressive aphasia Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is an innovative technique recently shown to improve language outcomes even in neurodegenerative conditions such as primary progressive aphasia (PPA), but the underlying brain mechanisms are not known. The present study tested whether the additional language gains with repetitive tDCS (over sham) in PPA are caused by changes in functional connectivity between

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2018 NeuroImage : Clinical

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