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Aphasia

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81. Time for a quick word? The striking benefits of training speed and accuracy of word retrieval in post-stroke aphasia. (PubMed)

Time for a quick word? The striking benefits of training speed and accuracy of word retrieval in post-stroke aphasia. One-third of stroke survivors experience deficits in word retrieval as a core characteristic of their aphasia, which is frustrating, socially limiting and disabling for their professional and everyday lives. The, as yet, undiscovered 'holy grail' of clinical practice is to establish a treatment that not only improves item naming, but also generalizes to patients' connected (...) -focused treatment. Both treatments were evaluated for naming, connected speech outcomes, and related to participants' neuropsychological and lesion profiles. Twenty participants with post-stroke chronic aphasia of varying severity and subtype took part in 12 computer-based treatment sessions over 6 weeks. Four carefully matched word sets were randomly allocated either to the speed- and accuracy-focused treatment, standard accuracy-only treatment, or untreated (two control sets). In the standard

2018 Brain

82. Changes in the corpus callosum during the recovery of aphasia: A case report. (PubMed)

Changes in the corpus callosum during the recovery of aphasia: A case report. The corpus callosum, which is the most important fiber pathway linking the bilateral hemispheres, plays a key role in information access, as well as the functional coordination and reorganization between the bilateral hemispheres. However, whether the corpus callosum will undergo structural changes during the recovery of aphasia is still unclear. In the current study, a Chinese aphasic patient with stroke was reported (...) to develop changes in the corpus callosum after speech therapy.A 33-year-old right-handed male patient had aphasia only without limb paralysis at 14 months after stroke.Neuroimaging evaluation confirmed a diagnosis of cerebral infarction in the left frontal lobe, insula and basal ganglia.He underwent 5-month speech therapy and received language function evaluation and DTI examination before and after speech therapy.The result ABC showed that the language functions in the patient, including spontaneous

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2018 Medicine

83. Rates of Amyloid Imaging Positivity in Patients With Primary Progressive Aphasia. (PubMed)

Rates of Amyloid Imaging Positivity in Patients With Primary Progressive Aphasia. The ability to predict the pathology underlying different neurodegenerative syndromes is of critical importance owing to the advent of molecule-specific therapies.To determine the rates of positron emission tomography (PET) amyloid positivity in the main clinical variants of primary progressive aphasia (PPA).This prospective clinical-pathologic case series was conducted at a tertiary research clinic specialized (...) amyloid brain imaging, 3 were excluded because of incomplete language evaluations, 5 for absence of significant aphasia, and 12 for presenting with significant initial symptoms outside of the language domain, leaving a cohort of 89 patients with PPA.Clinical, cognitive, neuroimaging, and pathology results.Twenty-eight cases were classified as imaging-supported semantic variant PPA (11 women [39.3%]; mean [SD] age, 64 [7] years), 31 nonfluent/agrammatic variant PPA (22 women [71.0%]; mean [SD] age, 68

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2018 JAMA neurology

84. Asymmetric TDP pathology in primary progressive aphasia with right hemisphere language dominance. (PubMed)

Asymmetric TDP pathology in primary progressive aphasia with right hemisphere language dominance. To quantitatively examine the regional densities and hemispheric distribution of the 43-kDa transactive response DNA-binding protein (TDP-43) inclusions, neurons, and activated microglia in a left-handed patient with right hemisphere language dominance and logopenic-variant primary progressive aphasia (PPA).Phosphorylated TDP-43 inclusions, neurons, and activated microglia were visualized

2018 Neurology

85. Predicting Recovery in Acute Post-stroke Aphasia. (PubMed)

Predicting Recovery in Acute Post-stroke Aphasia. Many stroke patients show remarkable recovery of language after initial severe impairment, but it is difficult to predict which patients will show good recovery. We aimed to identify patient and lesion characteristics that together predict the best naming outcome in 4 studies.We report 2 longitudinal studies that identified 2 variables at onset that were strongly associated with good recovery of naming (the most common residual deficit (...) in aphasia) in the first 6 months after stroke: damage to left posterior superior temporal gyrus (pSTG) and/or superior longitudinal fasciculus/arcuate fasciculus (SLF/AF), and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) use. We then tested these variables in 2 independent cohorts of chronic left hemisphere stroke patients, using chi-square tests and multivariate logistic regression for dichotomous outcomes and t tests for continuous outcomes.Lesion load in left pSTG and SLF/AF was associated

2018 Annals of Neurology

86. [18F]AV-1451 tau-PET and primary progressive aphasia. (PubMed)

[18F]AV-1451 tau-PET and primary progressive aphasia. To assess [18 F]AV-1451 tau-PET (positron emission tomography) uptake patterns across the primary progressive aphasia (PPA) variants (logopenic, semantic, and agrammatic), examine regional uptake patterns of [18 F]AV-1451 independent of clinical diagnosis, and compare the diagnostic utility of [18 F]AV-1451, [18 F]-fluorodeoxygluclose (FDG)-PET and MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) to differentiate the PPA variants.We performed statistical

2018 Annals of Neurology

87. Cerebral microbleeds and CSF Alzheimer biomarkers in primary progressive aphasias. (PubMed)

Cerebral microbleeds and CSF Alzheimer biomarkers in primary progressive aphasias. To reveal the prevalence and localization of cerebral microbleeds (CMBs) in the 3 main variants of primary progressive aphasia (PPA) (logopenic, semantic, and nonfluent/agrammatic), to identify the relationship with underlying Alzheimer pathology, and to explore whether CMBs contribute to language breakdown.We used a cross-sectional design in a multicenter cohort of 82 patients with PPA and 19 similarly aged

2018 Neurology

88. Validating new diagnostic imaging criteria for primary progressive aphasia via anatomical likelihood estimation meta-analyses.

Validating new diagnostic imaging criteria for primary progressive aphasia via anatomical likelihood estimation meta-analyses. Recently, diagnostic clinical and imaging criteria for primary progressive aphasia (PPA) have been revised by an international consortium (Gorno-Tempini et al. Neurology 2011;76:1006-14). The aim of this study was to validate the specificity of the new imaging criteria and investigate whether different imaging modalities [magnetic resonance imaging (MRI (...) ) and fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET)] require different diagnostic subtype-specific imaging criteria. Anatomical likelihood estimation meta-analyses were conducted for PPA subtypes across a large cohort of 396 patients: firstly, across MRI studies for each of the three PPA subtypes followed by conjunction and subtraction analyses to investigate the specificity, and, secondly, by comparing results across MRI vs. FDG-PET studies in semantic dementia and progressive nonfluent aphasia. Semantic

2018 European Journal of Neurology

89. Comment on 'Validating new diagnostic imaging criteria for primary progressive aphasia via anatomical likelihood estimation meta-analyses'.

Comment on 'Validating new diagnostic imaging criteria for primary progressive aphasia via anatomical likelihood estimation meta-analyses'. 27272109 2018 03 19 2018 12 02 1468-1331 23 7 2016 07 European journal of neurology Eur. J. Neurol. Comment on 'Validating new diagnostic imaging criteria for primary progressive aphasia via anatomical likelihood estimation meta-analyses'. e38 10.1111/ene.13022 Zhong J J Department of Neurology, Affiliated Yancheng Hospital, School of Medicine, Southeast (...) University, Yancheng, China. Shi H H Department of Neurology, Affiliated Yancheng Hospital, School of Medicine, Southeast University, Yancheng, China. Ma H H Department of Neurology, Kunshan Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Kunshan, China. Sheng L L Department of Neurology, Kunshan Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Kunshan, China. eng Letter Comment England Eur J Neurol 9506311 1351-5101 IM Eur J Neurol. 2016 Apr;23 (4):704-12 26901360 Eur J Neurol. 2016 Aug;23(8):e52-3 27431027 Aphasia

2018 European Journal of Neurology

90. Response to the letter on 'Validating new diagnostic imaging criteria for primary progressive aphasia via anatomical likelihood estimation meta-analyses'.

Response to the letter on 'Validating new diagnostic imaging criteria for primary progressive aphasia via anatomical likelihood estimation meta-analyses'. 27431027 2018 03 19 2018 12 02 1468-1331 23 8 2016 08 European journal of neurology Eur. J. Neurol. Response to the letter on 'Validating new diagnostic imaging criteria for primary progressive aphasia via anatomical likelihood estimation meta-analyses'. e52-3 10.1111/ene.13046 Bisenius S S Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain (...) Letter Comment England Eur J Neurol 9506311 1351-5101 IM Eur J Neurol. 2016 Jul;23 (7):e38 27272109 Eur J Neurol. 2016 Apr;23 (4):704-12 26901360 Aphasia, Primary Progressive Humans Likelihood Functions Magnetic Resonance Imaging Neuropsychological Tests logopenic progressive aphasia meta-analysis primary progressive aphasia progressive nonfluent aphasia semantic dementia 2016 04 19 2016 04 21 2016 7 20 6 0 2016 7 20 6 0 2018 3 20 6 0 ppublish 27431027 10.1111/ene.13046

2018 European Journal of Neurology

91. Repetitive sessions of tDCS to improve naming in post-stroke aphasia: Insights from an individual patient data (IPD) meta-analysis.

Repetitive sessions of tDCS to improve naming in post-stroke aphasia: Insights from an individual patient data (IPD) meta-analysis. Small clinical trials reported that repetitive sessions of tDCS could improve naming abilities in post-stroke aphasia. However, systematic meta-analyses found no effect, but all of these analyses pooled data from both single and repetitive sessions at the group level. The aim of this paper was to perform a meta-analysis based on individual patient data to explore (...) the effects of repetitive tDCS sessions on naming in post-stroke aphasia and in prespecified subgroups.We searched for published sham-controlled trials using the keywords "aphasia OR language" AND "transcranial direct current stimulation OR tDCS" AND "stroke". We computed an active and sham improvement ratio by dividing the difference between naming scores after and before the active or sham sessions, respectively, by the total number of picture items. Because of heterogeneity (I2 = 66%, p: 0.002), we

2018 Restorative neurology and neuroscience

92. Developmental conduction aphasia after neonatal stroke. (PubMed)

Developmental conduction aphasia after neonatal stroke. Impairment of speech repetition following injury to the dorsal language stream is a feature of conduction aphasia, a well-described "disconnection syndrome" in adults. The impact of similar lesions sustained in infancy has not been established.We compared language outcomes in term-born individuals with confirmed neonatal stroke (n = 30, age = 7-18 years, left-sided lesions in 21 cases) to matched controls (n = 40). Injury to the dorsal (...) was correlated with minimal or absent repetition deficits. Post hoc analysis of the repetition-impaired group revealed additional language-associated deficits, but these were more subtle and variable.We conclude that (1) despite the considerable plasticity of the infant brain, early dorsal language stream injury can result in specific and long-lasting problems with speech repetition that are similar to the syndrome of conduction aphasia seen in adults; and (2) language reorganization to the contralateral

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2018 Annals of Neurology

93. A language-based sum score for the course and therapeutic intervention in primary progressive aphasia (PubMed)

A language-based sum score for the course and therapeutic intervention in primary progressive aphasia With upcoming therapeutic interventions for patients with primary progressive aphasia (PPA), instruments for the follow-up of patients are needed to describe disease progression and to evaluate potential therapeutic effects. So far, volumetric brain changes have been proposed as clinical endpoints in the literature, but cognitive scores are still lacking. This study followed disease progression

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2018 Alzheimer's research & therapy

94. The contribution of executive control to semantic cognition: Convergent evidence from semantic aphasia and executive dysfunction (PubMed)

The contribution of executive control to semantic cognition: Convergent evidence from semantic aphasia and executive dysfunction Semantic cognition, as described by the controlled semantic cognition (CSC) framework (Rogers et al., , Neuropsychologia, 76, 220), involves two key components: activation of coherent, generalizable concepts within a heteromodal 'hub' in combination with modality-specific features (spokes), and a constraining mechanism that manipulates and gates this knowledge (...) to generate time- and task-appropriate behaviour. Executive-semantic goal representations, largely supported by executive regions such as frontal and parietal cortex, are thought to allow the generation of non-dominant aspects of knowledge when these are appropriate for the task or context. Semantic aphasia (SA) patients have executive-semantic deficits, and these are correlated with general executive impairment. If the CSC proposal is correct, patients with executive impairment should not only exhibit

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2018 Journal of neuropsychology

95. Atypical Kawasaki Disease Presenting with Hemiparesis and Aphasia: A Case Report (PubMed)

Atypical Kawasaki Disease Presenting with Hemiparesis and Aphasia: A Case Report Kawasaki disease (KD) is an inflammatory vasculitis. KD is classified into two groups based on clinical characteristics criteria, namely classic and incomplete. Cerebral vascular abnormality, especially arterial ischemic stroke (AIS) is very rare and unusual in KD. Here, we report a 4-year-old boy who was referred to our tertiary pediatric center with abrupt right hemiparesis and aphasia. At admission time, he had (...) febrile illness and was toxic. On physical examination, we found unilateral left submandibular lymphadenopathy. On neurologic examination, we obtained right sided hemiparesis with hemiparetic gait and aphasia. His deep tendon reflexes (DTRs) of right extremities were exaggerated and his sensory system was intact. Based on these features, some differential diagnoses were suggested, such as acute encephalitis with focal signs, brain abscess, cerebral vasculitis, hemorrhagic insults, and ischemic stroke

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2018 Iranian journal of medical sciences

96. Therapy-Induced Neuroplasticity in Chronic Aphasia After Phonological Component Analysis: A Matter of Intensity (PubMed)

Therapy-Induced Neuroplasticity in Chronic Aphasia After Phonological Component Analysis: A Matter of Intensity Despite the growing evidence regarding the importance of intensity and dose in aphasia therapy, few well-controlled studies contrasting the effects of intensive and non-intensive treatment have been conducted to date. Phonological components analysis (PCA) treatment for anomia has been associated with improvements in some patients with chronic aphasia; however, the effect of treatment (...) reflects the need to suppress errors to improve naming. Thus, both short-term intensive and standard, non-intensive, PCA treatment can improve word retrieval in chronic aphasia, but neuroimaging data suggest that improved naming is associated with different neural activation patterns in the two treatment conditions.

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2018 Frontiers in neurology

97. Telerehabilitation for aphasia – protocol of a pragmatic, exploratory, pilot randomized controlled trial (PubMed)

Telerehabilitation for aphasia – protocol of a pragmatic, exploratory, pilot randomized controlled trial The Cochrane review on the effectiveness of speech and language therapy for aphasia following stroke suggests intensity of therapy is a key predictor for outcome. Current aphasia services cannot provide intervention at the intensity observed within trial contexts because of resource limitations. Telerehabilitation could widen access to speech-language pathologists (SLPs) in geographically (...) remote contexts and reduce the time spent on travel by the therapist and patient. The current academic literature within this field is in its infancy, with few trials of speech and language therapy (SLT) delivered by videoconference. Our pilot randomized controlled trial (RCT) will explore feasibility aspects and effectiveness of telerehabilitation for aphasia in addition to standard SLT.Our study is a pragmatic, exploratory, pilot randomized controlled trial, where participants will be randomized

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2018 Trials

98. Etiology of language network changes during recovery of aphasia after stroke (PubMed)

Etiology of language network changes during recovery of aphasia after stroke Knowledge of spatiotemporal patterns of language network changes may help in predicting outcome in aphasic stroke patients. Here we assessed language function and performed functional MRI four times during one year to measure language network activation and cerebrovascular reactivity (with breath-holding) in twelve left-hemispheric stroke patients, of whom two dropped out before the final measurement, and eight age (...) inferior frontal gyrus were primarily related to differences in vascular reactivity. Furthermore, several language-activation changes could not be linked to alterations in language proficiency nor vascular reactivity, and were assumed to be caused by unspecified intersession variability. In conclusion, early functional neuroimaging improves outcome prediction of aphasia after stroke. Controlling for cerebrovascular reactivity and unspecified intersession variability may result in more accurate

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2018 Scientific reports

99. Speech and language therapists’ perspectives of therapeutic alliance construction and maintenance in aphasia rehabilitation post‐stroke (PubMed)

Speech and language therapists’ perspectives of therapeutic alliance construction and maintenance in aphasia rehabilitation post‐stroke Therapeutic alliance refers to the interactional and relational processes operating during therapeutic interventions. It has been shown to be a strong determinant of treatment efficacy in psychotherapy, and evidence is emerging from a range of healthcare and medical disciplines to suggest that the construct of therapeutic alliance may in fact be a variable (...) component of treatment outcome, engagement and satisfaction. Although this construct appears to be highly relevant to aphasia rehabilitation, no research to date has attempted to explore this phenomenon and thus consider its potential utility as a mechanism for change.To explore speech and language therapists' perceptions and experiences of developing and maintaining therapeutic alliances in aphasia rehabilitation post-stroke.Twenty-two, in-depth, semi-structured interviews were conducted with speech

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2018 International Journal of Language & Communication Disorders

100. Noun and verb processing in aphasia: Behavioural profiles and neural correlates (PubMed)

Noun and verb processing in aphasia: Behavioural profiles and neural correlates The behavioural and neural processes underpinning different word classes, particularly nouns and verbs, have been a long-standing area of interest in psycholinguistic, neuropsychology and aphasiology research. This topic has theoretical implications concerning the organisation of the language system, as well as clinical consequences related to the management of patients with language deficits. Research findings (...) , in a relatively large cohort of 48 patients with chronic post-stroke aphasia. A data-driven approach, principal component analysis (PCA), was also used to determine how noun and verb production and comprehension were related to the patients' underlying fundamental language domains. The results revealed no performance differences between noun and verb production and comprehension once matched on multiple psycholinguistic features including, most critically, imageability. Interestingly, the noun-verb

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2018 NeuroImage : Clinical

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