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Aphasia

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61. tDCS over the motor cortex improves lexical retrieval of action words in poststroke aphasia. (PubMed)

tDCS over the motor cortex improves lexical retrieval of action words in poststroke aphasia. One-third of stroke survivors worldwide suffer from aphasia. Speech and language therapy (SLT) is considered effective in treating aphasia, but because of time constraints, improvements are often limited. Noninvasive brain stimulation is a promising adjuvant strategy to facilitate SLT. However, stroke might render "classical" language regions ineffective as stimulation sites. Recent work showed (...) the effectiveness of motor cortex stimulation together with intensive naming therapy to improve outcomes in aphasia (Meinzer et al. 2016). Although that study highlights the involvement of the motor cortex, the functional aspects by which it influences language remain unclear. In the present study, we focus on the role of motor cortex in language, investigating its functional involvement in access to specific lexico-semantic (object vs. action relatedness) information in poststroke aphasia. To this end, we

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2018 Journal of neurophysiology

62. Melodic intonation therapy in post-stroke nonfluent aphasia: a randomized pilot trial. (PubMed)

Melodic intonation therapy in post-stroke nonfluent aphasia: a randomized pilot trial. To collect data to estimate the sample size of a definitive randomized controlled trial to evaluate the effects of Melodic Intonation Therapy in post-stroke nonfluent aphasia.A randomized, crossover, interventional pilot trial.Departments of Neurology and Rehabilitation from a university general hospital.Stroke survivors with post-stroke nonfluent aphasia.Patients randomized to group 1 had treatment (...) with Melodic Intonation Therapy first (12 sessions over six weeks) followed by no treatment; the patients in group 2 started active treatment between three and six months after their inclusion in the study, serving as waiting list controls for the first phase.The Communicative Activity Log (CAL) questionnaire and the Boston Diagnostic Aphasia Examination (BDAE) were evaluated at baseline, and at six and 12 weeks.Twenty patients were included. Four of the patients allocated to group 2 crossed over to group

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2018 Clinical rehabilitation

63. Technology-enhanced writing therapy for people with aphasia: results of a quasi-randomized waitlist controlled study. (PubMed)

Technology-enhanced writing therapy for people with aphasia: results of a quasi-randomized waitlist controlled study. Acquired writing impairment, or dysgraphia, is common in aphasia. It affects both handwriting and typing, and may recover less well than other aphasic symptoms. Dysgraphia is an increasing priority for intervention, particularly for those wishing to participate in online written communication. Effective dysgraphia treatment studies have been reported, but many did not target (...) of writing, which was administered in handwriting and on a computer with assistive technology enabled. Secondary measures were: The Boston Naming Test (written version), Communication Activities of Daily Living-2, Visual Analogue Mood Scales (Sad question), and the Assessment of Living with Aphasia. Analyses of variance (ANOVA) were used to examine change on the outcome measures over two time points, between which the immediate group had received therapy but the delayed group had not. Pre-therapy, post

2018 International Journal of Language & Communication Disorders

64. The Acute Aphasia IMplementation Study (AAIMS): a pilot cluster randomized controlled trial. (PubMed)

The Acute Aphasia IMplementation Study (AAIMS): a pilot cluster randomized controlled trial. Effective implementation strategies to improve speech and language therapists' (SLTs) aphasia management practices are needed. Australian SLTs working in the acute setting have reported inconsistent implementation of post-stroke aphasia guideline recommendations. Therefore, implementation efforts to address these gaps are necessary. However, little is known about the effectiveness of behaviour-change (...) strategies in SLTs providing acute aphasia management.This study designed and tested the feasibility, acceptability and potential effectiveness of a tailored implementation strategy to improve acute SLTs' uptake of evidence in two areas of practice: aphasia-friendly information provision; and collaborative goal setting.A pilot cluster randomized controlled trial design was used (retrospective trial registration number ACTRN12618000170224). Four acute SLT teams were randomly assigned to receive either

2018 International Journal of Language & Communication Disorders

65. Effect of type of language therapy on expressive language skills in patients with post-stroke aphasia. (PubMed)

Effect of type of language therapy on expressive language skills in patients with post-stroke aphasia. Constraint-induced (language) aphasia therapy (CIAT), based on constraint usage of the language channel only, massed practice and shaping through therapeutic language games, has been suggested as a more efficient therapy approach than traditional aphasia therapies.To examine the comparative efficacy of CIAT and a traditional therapy approach on expressive language ability, with the intensity (...) of therapy controlled and matched, in the treatment of post-stroke aphasia.Two successive 4-week blocks of intense (1 h, 5 days a week) of aphasia therapy programmes were delivered in a randomized within-subject crossover design: one therapy block consisted of stimulation aphasia therapy (SAT, a common traditional therapy approach), another of CIAT. Twenty consecutive patients, up to 1 year after stroke, were randomly assigned either to have SAT followed by CIAT (S1C2 group) or to have CIAT followed

2018 International Journal of Language & Communication Disorders

66. Communication and well-being outcomes of a hybrid service delivery model of intensive impairment-based treatment for aphasia in the hospital setting: a pilot study. (PubMed)

Communication and well-being outcomes of a hybrid service delivery model of intensive impairment-based treatment for aphasia in the hospital setting: a pilot study. This pilot study aimed to evaluate the effects of an intensive hybrid service delivery model (i.e., combining face-to-face individual, computer and group therapy) on communication and well-being for people with aphasia (PWA) in the hospital setting.The study explored two different intensities of the hybrid model, 4 h/week (Hybrid-4 (...) in communication and well-being for some PWA across different stages of recovery. Implications for rehabilitation The present findings help bridge the gap between what evidence suggests is effective intensity of rehabilitation for aphasia and what can be practically delivered in real-world hospital settings. Findings support the potential clinical value of employing a hybrid service model (using computer, group and individual therapy) to deliver intensive rehabilitation to people with aphasia in the hospital

2018 Disability and rehabilitation

67. Treatment integrity of elaborated semantic feature analysis aphasia therapy delivered in individual and group settings. (PubMed)

Treatment integrity of elaborated semantic feature analysis aphasia therapy delivered in individual and group settings. This study ran within the framework of the Thales Aphasia Project that investigated the efficacy of elaborated semantic feature analysis (ESFA). We evaluated the treatment integrity (TI) of ESFA, i.e., the degree to which therapists implemented treatment as intended by the treatment protocol, in two different formats: individual and group therapy.Based on the ESFA manual (...) , observation of therapy videos and TI literature, we developed two ESFA integrity checklists, for individual and group therapy, and used them to rate 15 videos of therapy sessions, delivered by three speech-language therapists (SLTs). Thirteen people with aphasia (PwA) were involved in this study. Reliability of the checklists was checked using Kappa statistics. Each session's TI was calculated. Differences in TI scores between the two therapy approaches were calculated using independent sample t-tests

2018 International Journal of Language & Communication Disorders

68. Accessibility and Applicability of Currently Available e-Mental Health Programs for Depression for People With Poststroke Aphasia: Scoping Review. (PubMed)

Accessibility and Applicability of Currently Available e-Mental Health Programs for Depression for People With Poststroke Aphasia: Scoping Review. Depression affects approximately 60% of people with aphasia 1 year post stroke and is associated with disability, lower quality of life, and mortality. Web-delivered mental health (e-mental health) programs are effective, convenient, and cost-effective for the general population and thus are increasingly used in the management of depression. However (...) , (2) communicative accessibility for people with aphasia via an aphasia-specific communicative accessibility evaluation tool, and (3) empirical evidence for the general population and stroke survivors with and without aphasia. The program that met the most general evaluation criteria and aphasia-specific communicative accessibility evaluation criteria was then trialed by a small subgroup of people with poststroke aphasia.A total of 8 programs were identified. Of these, 4 had published evidence

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2018 Journal of medical Internet research

69. Lesion mapping in acute stroke aphasia and its implications for recovery (PubMed)

Lesion mapping in acute stroke aphasia and its implications for recovery Patients with stroke offer a unique window into understanding human brain function. Mapping stroke lesions poses several challenges due to the complexity of the lesion anatomy and the mechanisms causing local and remote disruption on brain networks. In this prospective longitudinal study, we compare standard and advanced approaches to white matter lesion mapping applied to acute stroke patients with aphasia. Eighteen (...) patients with acute left hemisphere stroke were recruited and scanned within two weeks from symptom onset. Aphasia assessment was performed at baseline and six-month follow-up. Structural and diffusion MRI contrasts indicated an area of maximum overlap in the anterior external/extreme capsule with diffusion images showing a larger overlap extending into posterior perisylvian regions. Anatomical predictors of recovery included damage to ipsilesional tracts (as shown by both structural and diffusion

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2018 Neuropsychologia

70. Conduction Aphasia as Initial Manifestation of Tuberculous Meningitis (PubMed)

Conduction Aphasia as Initial Manifestation of Tuberculous Meningitis Conduction aphasia being the arcuate fasciculus of the site of structural injury is a speech disorder characterized by fluent, spontaneous speech and paraphasias, intact auditory comprehension, and limited repetition. One of the causes of stroke in young adults is the Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) infection, which may cause cerebral ischemia secondary to artery obliteration. In this case report, we present a previously (...) healthy 24-year-old woman that presented with a sudden onset of aphasia; MTB was identified as the etiological agent. Tuberculous meningitis (TBM) has a wide range of clinical manifestations with aphasia being one of the rarest forms of initial presentation.

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2018 Cureus

71. Thalamic bacterial abscess presenting with hemiparesis and expressive aphasia (PubMed)

Thalamic bacterial abscess presenting with hemiparesis and expressive aphasia Brain abscesses are relative rare in the developing world, with an incidence of 2% of all space occupying lesions. Deep-seated abscesses such as thalamic and basal ganglia abscesses are much rarer than abscesses in other locations of the brain, comprising 1.3-6% of all brain abscesses. These abscesses may present with hemiparesis, and subcortical aphasia has only been reported in a few cases throughout the literature (...) . Here we present and discuss a case of thalamic brain abscess caused by S. anginosus that presented with subcortical aphasia.

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2018 IDCases

72. Single-word comprehension deficits in the nonfluent variant of primary progressive aphasia (PubMed)

Single-word comprehension deficits in the nonfluent variant of primary progressive aphasia A subset of patients with the nonfluent variant of primary progressive aphasia (PPA) exhibit concomitant single-word comprehension problems, constituting a 'mixed variant' phenotype. This phenotype is rare and currently not fully characterized. The aim of this study was twofold: to assess the prevalence and nature of single-word comprehension problems in the nonfluent variant and to study multimodal

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2018 Alzheimer's research & therapy

73. Impairments in the Comprehension of Indoor Object/Body Part Words and Family Relationships in a Patient with Aphasia due to Cerebral Infarction of the Left Parietal and Temporal Lobes (PubMed)

Impairments in the Comprehension of Indoor Object/Body Part Words and Family Relationships in a Patient with Aphasia due to Cerebral Infarction of the Left Parietal and Temporal Lobes The present report discusses the case of a 73-year-old right-handed man who exhibited signs of aphasia caused by cerebral infarction in the left temporoparietal region. Neuropsychological evaluation revealed that he had difficulty in comprehending words related to indoor objects, body parts, and family

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2018 Case reports in neurology

74. Retained capacity for perceptual learning of degraded speech in primary progressive aphasia and Alzheimer’s disease (PubMed)

Retained capacity for perceptual learning of degraded speech in primary progressive aphasia and Alzheimer’s disease Processing of degraded speech is a promising model for understanding communication under challenging listening conditions, core auditory deficits and residual capacity for perceptual learning and cerebral plasticity in major dementias.We compared the processing of sine-wave-degraded speech in 26 patients with primary progressive aphasia (non-fluent, semantic, and logopenic (...) variants), 10 patients with typical Alzheimer's disease and 17 healthy control subjects. Participants were required to identify sine-wave words that were more predictable (three-digit numbers) or less predictable (place names). The change in identification performance within each session indexed perceptual learning. Neuroanatomical associations of degraded speech processing were assessed using voxel-based morphometry.Patients with non-fluent and logopenic progressive aphasia and typical Alzheimer's

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2018 Alzheimer's research & therapy

75. Clustering Analysis of FDG-PET Imaging in Primary Progressive Aphasia (PubMed)

Clustering Analysis of FDG-PET Imaging in Primary Progressive Aphasia Background: Primary progressive aphasia (PPA) is a clinical syndrome characterized by the neurodegeneration of language brain systems. Three main clinical forms (non-fluent, semantic, and logopenic PPA) have been recognized, but applicability of the classification and the capacity to predict the underlying pathology is controversial. We aimed to study FDG-PET imaging data in a large consecutive case series of patients

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2018 Frontiers in aging neuroscience

76. Anatomy of aphasia revisited. (PubMed)

Anatomy of aphasia revisited. In most cases, aphasia is caused by strokes involving the left hemisphere, with more extensive damage typically being associated with more severe aphasia. The classical model of aphasia commonly adhered to in the Western world is the Wernicke-Lichtheim model. The model has been in existence for over a century, and classification of aphasic symptomatology continues to rely on it. However, far more detailed models of speech and language localization in the brain have

2018 Brain

77. Modeling Treated Recovery From Aphasia

Modeling Treated Recovery From Aphasia Modeling Treated Recovery From Aphasia - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. Modeling Treated Recovery From Aphasia The safety and scientific validity (...) Communication Disorders (NIDCD) Information provided by (Responsible Party): Julius Fridriksson, PhD, University of South Carolina Study Details Study Description Go to Brief Summary: Stroke is the leading cause of adult disability in the United States, and aphasia is common following a stroke to the left hemisphere of the brain. Aphasia therapy can improve aphasia recover; however, very little is known about how different patients respond to different types of treatments. The purpose of this study

2018 Clinical Trials

78. Validation of a prediction model for long-term outcome of aphasia after stroke. (PubMed)

Validation of a prediction model for long-term outcome of aphasia after stroke. About 30% of stroke patients suffer from aphasia. As aphasia strongly affects daily life, most patients request a prediction of outcome of their language function. Prognostic models provide predictions of outcome, but external validation is essential before models can be used in clinical practice. We aim to externally validate the prognostic model from the Sequential Prognostic Evaluation of Aphasia after stroKe (...) (SPEAK-model) for predicting the long-term outcome of aphasia caused by stroke.We used data from the Rotterdam Aphasia Therapy Study - 3 (RATS-3), a multicenter RCT with inclusion criteria similar to SPEAK, an observational prospective study. Baseline assessment in SPEAK was four days after stroke and in RATS-3 eight days. Outcome of the SPEAK-model was the Aphasia Severity Rating Scale (ASRS) at 1 year, dichotomized into good (ASRS-score of 4 or 5) and poor outcome (ASRS-score < 4). In RATS-3, ASRS

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2018 BMC Neurology

79. Leukoaraiosis is independently associated with naming outcome in poststroke aphasia. (PubMed)

Leukoaraiosis is independently associated with naming outcome in poststroke aphasia. To test the hypothesis that severity of leukoaraiosis in the noninfarcted hemisphere at onset is associated with poorer language outcome after poststroke aphasia independently of volume of infarct, damage to 3 critical language areas (left inferior frontal gyrus, superior longitudinal fasciculus, and superior temporal gyrus), comorbid conditions, and time since stroke.In this cross-sectional study, we evaluated (...) naming outcome (>3 months after stroke) in 42 individuals who initially had aphasia after stroke. We rated leukoaraiosis in the right hemisphere 1 to 4 weeks from onset of stroke using the Cardiovascular Health Study rating scale. We evaluated associations between severity of leukoaraiosis and each measure of naming using Spearman correlations and evaluated the independent contributions of leukoaraiosis, lesion volume, months since onset, comorbid conditions, and damage to critical nodes

2018 Neurology

80. Atrophy and microglial distribution in primary progressive aphasia with TDP-43. (PubMed)

Atrophy and microglial distribution in primary progressive aphasia with TDP-43. To quantitatively determine the density and distribution of activated microglia across cortical regions and hemispheres in the brains of primary progressive aphasia (PPA) participants with pathological diagnoses of frontotemporal lobar degeneration with transactive response DNA-binding protein-43 (TDP-43) inclusions and to examine the relationships between microglial densities, patterns of focal atrophy, (TDP-43

2018 Annals of Neurology

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