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Aphasia

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4321. Aphasia in hyperacute stroke: language follows brain penumbra dynamics. (Abstract)

Aphasia in hyperacute stroke: language follows brain penumbra dynamics. During the first few hours after onset, stroke symptoms may evolve rapidly. We studied the correlation between brain perfusion and aphasia changes during the hyperacute phase of stroke using a new technique of perfusion computed tomography (P-CT). Using an aphasia score developed for each language modality, language was evaluated within 6 hours after onset, then sequentially during the first week. Maps of the penumbra (...) and infarct obtained from P-CT images and definite infarct size evaluated using T2 and diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI) on day 3 were rated by a neuroradiologist, blinded to the clinical deficit. Within 6 hours, deficits in all language modalities were present in 13 out of 24 consecutive patients, corresponding to large anterior-posterior perfusion deficits of the left middle cerebral artery (MCA) territory. The aphasia score correlated with a corresponding perfusion deficit in specific areas of the MCA

2003 Annals of Neurology

4322. Axonal injury within language network in primary progressive aphasia. (Abstract)

Axonal injury within language network in primary progressive aphasia. Primary progressive aphasia (PPA) is characterized by an isolated progressive impairment of word use and comprehension reflecting the distribution of pathological processes within the left hemisphere. We used proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) to study in vivo the integrity of axonal fibers connecting perisylvian language areas in 11 patients with PPA, 11 subjects with Alzheimer's disease, and 22 controls. Brain

2003 Annals of Neurology

4323. LGI1 is mutated in familial temporal lobe epilepsy characterized by aphasic seizures. (Abstract)

LGI1 is mutated in familial temporal lobe epilepsy characterized by aphasic seizures. Autosomal dominant lateral temporal lobe epilepsy previously has been linked to chromosome 10q22-q24, and recently mutations in the LGI1 gene (Leucine-rich gene, Glioma Inactivated) have been found in some autosomal dominant lateral temporal lobe epilepsy families. We have now identified a missense mutation affecting a conserved cysteine residue in the extracellular region of the LGI1 protein. The C46R (...) mutation is associated with autosomal dominant lateral temporal lobe epilepsy in a large Norwegian family showing unusual clinical features like short-lasting sensory aphasia and auditory symptoms.

2002 Annals of Neurology

4324. Primary progressive aphasia: PPA and the language network. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Primary progressive aphasia: PPA and the language network. Primary Progressive Aphasia (PPA) is a behaviorally focal dementia syndrome with deterioration of language functions but relative preservation of other cognitive domains for at least the first two years of disease. In this study, PPA patients with impaired word finding but intact comprehension of conversational speech and their matched control subjects were examined using voxel-based morphometry (VBM) and functional magnetic resonance

2003 Annals of Neurology

4325. Revisiting the dissociation between singing and speaking in expressive aphasia. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Revisiting the dissociation between singing and speaking in expressive aphasia. We investigated the production of sung and spoken utterances in a non-fluent patient, C.C., who had a severe expressive aphasia following a right-hemisphere stroke, but whose language comprehension and memory were relatively preserved. In experiment 1, C.C. repeated familiar song excerpts under four different conditions: spoken lyrics, sung lyrics on original melody, lyrics sung on new but familiar melody and melody (...) . Therefore, our findings do not support the claim that singing helps word production in non-fluent aphasic patients. Rather, they are consistent with the idea that verbal production, be it sung or spoken, result from the operation of same mechanisms.

2003 Brain

4326. Progressive non-fluent aphasia is associated with hypometabolism centred on the left anterior insula. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Progressive non-fluent aphasia is associated with hypometabolism centred on the left anterior insula. Progressive non-fluent aphasia (PNFA) is a syndrome in which patients lose the ability to communicate fluently in the context of relative preservation of single word comprehension and non-linguistic cognitive abilities. Neuroimaging in case studies with PNFA has failed to identify a consistent neural substrate for the language disorder. In this study of a group of patients (n=10) whose (...) not include non-fluent aphasic features. In this analysis, the only persisting hypometabolic region was that centred over the left anterior insula. VBM did not identify any regional differences in atrophy between PNFA and Alzheimer's disease. In the light of current theories of fluent language production, the findings offer anatomical evidence that the breakdown in fluency is due to a motor articulatory planning deficit (speech apraxia) combined with a variable degree of agrammatism.

2003 Brain

4327. MAAS (Multi-axial Aphasia System): realistic goal setting in aphasia rehabilitation. (Abstract)

and interdisciplinary process of clinical decision-making. The objectives of this study were to investigate the potentialities of MAAS in predicting the outcome of cognitive-linguistic treatment. A group of 58 aphasic patients were investigated prospectively. All received cognitive-linguistic treatment during a randomized, controlled study on the efficacy of lexical semantic treatment. An interdisciplinary aphasia team rated the pretreatment MAAS profiles of all patients. The team was blinded for treatment (...) , the neuropsychological axis contributed to the prediction. An interdisciplinary approach to aphasia assessment may contribute to realistic goal setting in aphasia rehabilitation. The results of this study stress the importance of neuropsychological assessment of aphasic patients before treatment.

2008 International journal of rehabilitation research. Internationale Zeitschrift für Rehabilitationsforschung. Revue internationale de recherches de réadaptation Controlled trial quality: uncertain

4328. Constraint-induced aphasia therapy stimulates language recovery in patients with chronic aphasia after ischemic stroke. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Constraint-induced aphasia therapy stimulates language recovery in patients with chronic aphasia after ischemic stroke. Constraint-induced aphasia therapy (CIAT) offers potential benefits to individuals with history of aphasia-producing ischemic stroke. The goals of this pilot study were to implement the original German CIAT protocol, refine the treatment program, and confirm its efficacy in patients with chronic aphasia.We translated and modified the original CIAT protocol to include (...) a hierarchy of individual skill levels for semantic, syntactic, and phonological language production, while constraining non-use behaviors. Three male participants with moderate to severe post-stroke aphasia received CIAT 3-4 hours/day for 5 consecutive days. Pre and post-testing included formal language evaluation, linguistic analysis of story retell, and mini-Communication Activity Log (mini-CAL).Substantial improvements in comprehension and verbal skills were noted in 2 patients with an increase

2008 Medical science monitor : international medical journal of experimental and clinical research

4329. Long-term stability of improved language functions in chronic aphasia after constraint-induced aphasia therapy. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Long-term stability of improved language functions in chronic aphasia after constraint-induced aphasia therapy. In response to the established notion that improvement of language functions in chronic aphasia only can be achieved through long-term treatment, we examined the efficacy of a short-term, intensive language training, constraint-induced aphasia therapy (CIAT). This program is founded on the learning principles of prevention of compensatory communication (constraint), massed practice (...) , and shaping (induced).Twenty-seven patients with chronic aphasia received 30 hours of training over 10 days. Twelve patients were trained with the CIAT program. For 15 patients the training included a module of written language and an additional training in everyday communication, which involved the assistance of family members (CIATplus). Outcome measures included standardized neurolinguistic testing and ratings of the quality and the amount of daily communication.Language functions improved

2005 Stroke

4330. Extreme altitude transient aphasia. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Extreme altitude transient aphasia. 9015606 1997 04 10 2018 11 13 0306-3674 30 4 1996 Dec British journal of sports medicine Br J Sports Med Extreme altitude transient aphasia. 364 Garrido E E Department of Physiological Sciences, Medical School, University of Barcelona, Spain. Javierre C C eng Case Reports Journal Article England Br J Sports Med 0432520 0306-3674 IM Br J Sports Med. 1996 Dec;30(4):275-6 9015582 Altitude Aphasia etiology Humans Male Mountaineering 1996 12 1 1996 12 1 0 1 1996

1996 British Journal of Sports Medicine

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