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Antibiotics in Pregnancy

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41. Effects of antibiotics use during pregnancy on risk of spontaneous abortion: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Effects of antibiotics use during pregnancy on risk of spontaneous abortion: a systematic review and meta-analysis Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external websites. Email salutation (e.g. "Dr Smith" or "Joanne") for correspondence

2018 PROSPERO

42. Pregnancy and Renal Disease

to the survey, including 76 (49%) nephrologists, 36 (23%) obstetricians, 16 (10%) pharmacists, 12 (8%) midwives, 7 (4%) obstetric physicians, 5 (3%) physicians, 2 (1%) patients, 1 dietician and 1 person with role in guideline development. Of those completing the survey, 57 (37%) were part of a specialist multidisciplinary team managing women with CKD in pregnancy and 72 (46%) were routinely involved in either the renal or obstetric care of pregnant women with CKD. The strength of the recommendation (...) guidelines 19 6. Lay summary 74 7. Acknowledgements 75 Appendix 1. The experience of pregnancy and renal disease……………………………………………………………………………….76 Appendix 2. Summary of clinical responsibility for elements of the guideline 80 Appendix 3. Ovid Medline search terms (1946 to 2018) 81 Renal Association Clinical Practice Guideline Pregnancy and Renal Disease – September 2019 4 1. Introduction 1. Background Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is estimated to affect 3% of pregnant women in high-income countries

2019 Renal Association

43. Pregnancy and lower urinary tract infection: opt for cefuroxime

antibiotics are cefuroxime and the combination of amoxicillin + clavulanic acid, because a large amount of data on short-term exposure is available. This includes around 400 pregnancies exposed from the first trimester to cefuroxime, and 500 exposed to the combination of amoxicillin + clavulanic acid, in which no problem was identified. In mid-2017, proprietary drugs based on single-dose fosfomycin trometamol were authorised in France for urinary tract infections in pregnant women, after having been (...) recommended by a range of institutions. This recommendation was based on a few clinical trials which showed similar efficacy to that of standard antibiotic treatment. Fosfomycin trometamol crosses the placenta and is widely distributed in the body. During the first trimester, assessment of the consequences for the unborn child of exposure to fosfomycin trometamol is based on around 150 pregnancies. No worrying safety alert has appeared, but these data are too few in number to exclude a significant risk

2019 Prescrire

44. Venous thromboembolism (VTE) prophylaxis in pregnancy and the puerperium

) • Preeclampsia/eclampsia • Artificial reproductive therapy • Gestational diabetes • Multiparity (> 2) • Multiple pregnancy • Intrauterine growth restriction • Hyperemesis/dehydration • Current systemic infection (requiring antibiotics or hospitalisation) • Antepartum haemorrhage • Surgical procedure in pregnancy Known Risk Factors • Single prior provoked VTE (not COCP related) • Asymptomatic thrombophilia (inherited or acquired) • Family history VTE • Family history VTE (but no personal history VTE (...) deterioration of pregnant patients 8 • Use standard administration forms for prophylactic and therapeutic medications (e.g. Heparin intravenous infusion order and administration form) 20,21 o For Dalteparin, write the brand name in addition to the generic name to reduce ambiguity 22 Queensland Clinical Guideline: VTE prophylaxis in pregnancy and the puerperium Refer to online version, destroy printed copies after use Page 10 of 25 2 Risk assessment Failure to recognise and/or treat personal or pregnancy

2020 Queensland Health

45. ASCIA Guidelines - Acute management of anaphylaxis in pregnancy

the pregnant and non-pregnant population. A dose of 0.5mg adrenaline intramuscularly (IM) can be given for treatment of anaphylaxis in pregnancy. Anaphylaxis definitions Any acute onset illness with typical skin features (urticarial rash or erythema/flushing, and/or angioedema), PLUS involvement of respiratory and/or cardiovascular and/or persistent severe gastrointestinal symptoms; or Any acute onset of hypotension or bronchospasm or upper airway obstruction where anaphylaxis is considered possible, even (...) without typical skin features present. Signs and symptoms in maternal anaphylaxis The signs and symptoms of anaphylaxis in pregnant women are the same as for non-pregnant women, though several additional features are possible. Additional signs and symptoms include: Persistent hypotension - may be the predominant feature Intense vulvar and vaginal itching (particularly if allergic reaction/IgE-mediated reaction to latex) Low back pain Uterine cramps Fetal distress Common culprits include antibiotics

2020 Australasian Society of Clinical Immunology and Allergy

46. The safety and pharmacokinetics of antibiotics in pregnant women: a systematic review of antibiotics considered for plague

The safety and pharmacokinetics of antibiotics in pregnant women: a systematic review of antibiotics considered for plague Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external websites. Email salutation (e.g. "Dr Smith" or "Joanne") for correspondence

2018 PROSPERO

47. Antibiotic Therapy in Preterm Premature Rupture of the Membranes

PPROM at 32 weeks' gestation, antibiotics should be administered to women who are not in labour in order to prolong pregnancy and to decrease maternal and neonatal morbidity (I-A). 2. The use of antibiotics should be gestational-age dependent. The evidence for benefit is greater at earlier gestational ages (<32 weeks) (I-A). 3. For women with PPROM at >32 weeks' gestation, administration of antibiotics to prolong pregnancy is recommended if fetal lung maturity cannot be proven and/or delivery (...) Antibiotic Therapy in Preterm Premature Rupture of the Membranes No. 233-Antibiotic Therapy in Preterm Premature Rupture of the Membranes - Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Canada Email/Username: Password: Remember me Search Terms Search within Search Volume 39, Issue 9, Pages e207–e212 No. 233-Antibiotic Therapy in Preterm Premature Rupture of the Membranes x Mark H. Yudin , MD Toronto, ON x Julie van Schalkwyk , MD Vancouver, BC x Nancy Van Eyk , MD Halifax, NS No. 233, September 2017

2017 Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada

48. Cystitis: taking an antibiotic

Cystitis: taking an antibiotic Decision aid for cystitis: taking an antibiotic © NICE 2018. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights. Last updated November 2018 Page 1 of 2 Decision aid Cystitis: taking an antibiotic Information to help women who are not pregnant discuss the options with their healthcare professionals. Cystitis is usually caused by bacteria (germs) from your gut getting into your bladder (also called lower urinary tract infection, UTI). Sometimes symptoms get better (...) are not pregnant get these (so more than 99 in 100 don’t). There’s no good evidence to know whether taking an antibiotic straightaway or waiting to take an antibiotic makes a difference to the chance of getting complications. It is not possible to know in advance what will happen to any individual person. What are the disadvantages of taking an antibiotic for cystitis? Antibiotics can cause side effects, but not everyone gets them. About 10 to 20 people in 100 get side effects with antibiotics for cystitis

2018 Health Information and Quality Authority

49. The activity of commercial antimicrobials, and essential oils and ethanolic extracts of Olea europaea on Streptococcus agalactiae isolated from pregnant women. Full Text available with Trip Pro

The activity of commercial antimicrobials, and essential oils and ethanolic extracts of Olea europaea on Streptococcus agalactiae isolated from pregnant women. Streptococcus agalactiae also known as Group B Streptococcus (GBS) is a major cause of disease in pregnant women and new born babies where it causes early and late onset disease characterised by sepsis, pneumonia and meningitis. Ten to 37 % of pregnant women in the world are colonised with GBS while intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis has (...) as an alternative source of antimicrobials.

2019 BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine

50. Management of Group B Streptococcal Bacteriuria in Pregnancy

, and Costs The recommendations in this guideline are designed to help clinicians identify pregnancies in which it is appropriate to treat GBS bacteriuria to optimize maternal and perinatal outcomes, to reduce the occurrences of antibiotic anaphylaxis, and to prevent increases in antibiotic resistance to GBS and non-GBS pathogens. No cost-benefit analysis is provided. Recommendations 1. Treatment of any bacteriuria with colony counts ≥100 000 CFU/mL in pregnancy is an accepted and recommended strategy (...) and includes treatment with appropriate antibiotics (II-2A). 2. Women with documented group B streptococcal bacteriuria (regardless of level of colony-forming units per mL) in the current pregnancy should be treated at the time of labour or rupture of membranes with appropriate intravenous antibiotics for the prevention of early-onset neonatal group B streptococcal disease (II-2A). 3. Asymptomatic women with urinary group B streptococcal colony counts <100 000 CFU/mL in pregnancy should not be treated

2018 Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada

51. Management of Cardiovascular Diseases during Pregnancy Full Text available with Trip Pro

dissection, and myocardial infarction (MI) were the most common causes of maternal death in the UK over the period 2006–08. Knowledge of the risks associated with CVDs during pregnancy and their management in pregnant women who suffer from serious pre-existing conditions is of pivotal importance for advising patients before pregnancy. Since all measures concern not only the mother but the foetus as well, the optimum treatment of both must be targeted. A therapy favourable for the mother can be associated (...) Management of Cardiovascular Diseases during Pregnancy We use cookies to enhance your experience on our website. By continuing to use our website, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. You can change your cookie settings at any time. 2018 ESC Guidelines for the management of cardiovascular diseases during pregnancy | European Heart Journal | Oxford Academic Search Account Menu Menu Navbar Search Filter Mobile Microsite Search Term Close search filter search input Article Navigation Close

2018 European Society of Cardiology

52. Pregnancy

cause serious adverse pregnancy outcomes for both mother and child including preterm birth and small-for-gestational-age babies. Interventions used to prevent RUTI in women who are pregnant can be pharmacological (antibiotics) or non-pharmacological (cranberry products, acupuncture, probiotics and behavioural (...) modifications). So far little is known about the best way to prevent RUTI in pregnant women. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of interventions for preventing RUTI in pregnant women.The (...) have questions please contact us via jon.brassey@tripdatabase.com Top results for pregnancy 1. Oral anti-diabetic agents for women with established diabetes/impaired glucose tolerance or previous gestational diabetes planning pregnancy , or pregnant women with pre-existing diabetes. BACKGROUND: While most guidance recommends the use of insulin in women whose pregnancies are affected by pre-existing diabetes, oral anti-diabetic agents may be more acceptable to women. The effects of these oral anti

2018 Trip Latest and Greatest

53. Care of Women with Obesity in Pregnancy

What care should be provided in the primary care setting to women of childbearing age with obesity who wish to become pregnant? Primary care services should ensure that all women of childbearing age have the opportunity to optimise their weight before pregnancy. Advice on weight and lifestyle should be given during preconception counselling or contraceptive consultations. Weight and BMI should be measured to encourage women to optimise their weight before pregnancy. P Women of childbearing age (...) after caesarean (VBAC) section. B What nutritional supplements should be recommended to women with obesity who wish to become pregnant? Women with a BMI 30 kg/m 2 or greater wishing to become pregnant should be advised to take 5 mg folic acid supplementation daily, starting at least 1 month before conception and continuing during the ?rst trimester of pregnancy. D Obese women are at high risk of vitamin D de?ciency. However, although vitamin D supplementation may ensure that women are vitamin D

2018 Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists

54. Antibiotic Overconsumption in Pregnant Women With Urinary Tract Symptoms in Uganda. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Antibiotic Overconsumption in Pregnant Women With Urinary Tract Symptoms in Uganda. Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are one of the most common bacterial infections in women. During pregnancy physiological changes, like frequency, mimic UTI symptoms, and therefore bacteriological cultures are needed to confirm the diagnosis. However, in developing countries antibiotic therapy is commonly initiated without culture confirmation.We investigated the prevalence of bacteriuria among pregnant women (...) with and without UTI symptoms in Uganda. In total 2 562 urine samples were evaluated with nitrite and leukocyte esterase tests, using urine culture and/or dipslide with species identification as reference.The prevalence of culture-proven UTI among pregnant women with UTI symptoms was 4%. Since treatment is initiated based only on the presence of symptoms, 96% were erroneously given antibiotics. Further, there is a high prevalence of resistance to commonly used antibiotics, with 18 % ESBL and 36 % multidrug

2017 Clinical Infectious Diseases

55. Prevalence, aetiology and antibiotic sensitivity profile of asymptomatic bacteriuria isolates from pregnant women in selected antenatal clinic from Nairobi, Kenya Full Text available with Trip Pro

Prevalence, aetiology and antibiotic sensitivity profile of asymptomatic bacteriuria isolates from pregnant women in selected antenatal clinic from Nairobi, Kenya Asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB) is the presence of bacteria in urine without apparent symptoms of urinary tract infections. The importance of asymptomatic bacteriuria lies in the insight it provides into symptomatic infections. To determine prevalence, bacterial isolates and Antibiotic Sensitivity Profile of asymptomatic bacterial (...) urinary tract infection in pregnant women in selected clinics in Nairobi.This was a cross-sectional study involving women attending antenatal clinic at selected clinics of Nairobi County. The women who met the inclusion criteria were included in the study. The midstream urine samples of these women were subjected to microscopy, culture and sensitivity.A total of 1020 of women on their first antenatal clinic visit participated in the study; 219 of them had ASB, giving a prevalence of 21.5 % at 95

2017 The Pan African medical journal

56. Immunization Against Group B Streptococci vs. Intrapartum Antibiotic Prophylaxis in Peripartum Pregnant Women and their Neonates: A Review Full Text available with Trip Pro

Immunization Against Group B Streptococci vs. Intrapartum Antibiotic Prophylaxis in Peripartum Pregnant Women and their Neonates: A Review Group B streptococcus (GBS) is an organism that has an immense global impact on neonatal morbidity and mortality. GBS is known to colonize the gastrointestinal and genitourinary tracts of infected pregnant women. Transmission to the neonate is achieved during labor and delivery. Complications of neonatal infection include sepsis, meningitis, and pneumonia (...) . Preventative measures are needed to reduce the disease burden. The current method of prophylaxis being utilized is intrapartum antibiotics. Though effective, it presents limitations that include a required, lengthy duration of treatment, increased antibiotic resistance, and lack of late-onset disease coverage. Recent studies are exploring alternative methods of prophylaxis such as vaccination. Vaccination provides coverage of both early and late-onset disease to infected women who are unable to complete

2017 Cureus

57. Morbidity in Pregnant Women Associated with Unverified Penicillin Allergies, Antibiotic Use, and Group B Streptococcus Infections Full Text available with Trip Pro

Morbidity in Pregnant Women Associated with Unverified Penicillin Allergies, Antibiotic Use, and Group B Streptococcus Infections The morbidity potentially associated with unverified penicillin allergy in pregnant women, with and without group B streptococcus (GBS) infections, is unknown. Penicillin allergy testing is safe during pregnancy but is done infrequently.To determine morbidity associated with antibiotic use in a large cohort of pregnant women, with and without an unverified history (...) of penicillin allergy, and with and without GBS.Retrospective. All pregnant women who delivered live infants in Kaiser Permanente Southern California between January 1, 2009, and December 31, 2014, were identified.Penicillin allergy status at delivery, delivery method, maternal and infant hospital utilization, peripartum antibiotic exposures, new antibiotic-associated adverse drug reactions, and new Clostridium difficile infections.There were 170,379 unique women who had 201,316 pregnancies during the study

2017 The Permanente journal

58. Pneumonia (hospital-acquired): antimicrobial prescribing

cannot be used; specialist advice only) 600 mg twice a day orally or IV Pneumonia (hospital-acquired): antimicrobial prescribing (NG139) © NICE 2019. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and- conditions#notice-of-rights). Page 8 of 231 See BNF for appropriate use and dosing in specific populations, for example, hepatic impairment, renal impairment, pregnancy and breastfeeding, and administering intravenous (or, where appropriate, intramuscular) antibiotics (...) of 23Contents Contents Overview 4 Who is it for? 4 Recommendations 5 1.1 Managing hospital-acquired pneumonia 5 1.2 Choice of antibiotic 6 T erms used in the guideline 13 Hospital-acquired pneumonia 13 Summary of the evidence 14 Antibiotic prescribing strategies 14 Choice of antibiotics 15 Antibiotic course length, dosage and route of administration 22 Other considerations 23 Medicines adherence 23 Resource implications 23 Pneumonia (hospital-acquired): antimicrobial prescribing (NG139) © NICE 2019. All

2019 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

59. Pneumonia (community-acquired): antimicrobial prescribing

-lactamase inhibitor) with with clarithrom clarithromy ycin cin or erythrom erythromy ycin cin (in pregnancy). This provides broad-spectrum gram- negative cover and cover for atypical pathogens. The high risk of mortality in this population outweighs the potential adverse effects and increased risk of antimicrobial resistance with broad-spectrum antibiotics. The alternativ alternative antibiotic e antibiotic for adults with high-severity community-acquired pneumonia and penicillin allergy is le lev voflo (...) 37 Resource implications 37 Pneumonia (community-acquired): antimicrobial prescribing (NG138) © NICE 2019. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and- conditions#notice-of-rights). Page 3 of 37Ov Overview erview This guideline sets out an antimicrobial prescribing strategy for adults, young people, children and babies aged 72 hours and over with a confirmed diagnosis of community-acquired pneumonia. It aims to optimise antibiotic use and reduce antibiotic

2019 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

60. Cellulitis and erysipelas: antimicrobial prescribing

Erythromycin (in pregnancy) 8 to 17 years, 250 to 500 mg four times a day orally for 5 to 7 days 5 First-choice antibiotic if infection near the e First-choice antibiotic if infection near the ey yes or nose es or nose 8 8 ( (consider seeking specialist advice; consider seeking specialist advice; giv give or e oral unless person unable to tak al unless person unable to take or e oral or se al or sev verely un erely unwell) well) 3 3 Cellulitis and erysipelas: antimicrobial prescribing (NG141) © NICE 2019 (...) , but there is no evidence that dual therapy is more effective than, for example, flucloxacillin alone. Additionally, the committee considered that dual therapy may increase the risk of antimicrobial resistance and adverse effects. The committee agreed that oral macrolides, clarithrom clarithromy ycin cin or erythrom erythromy ycin cin (in pregnancy), are suitable alternatives to flucloxacillin in people who have penicillin allergy or where flucloxacillin is not a suitable option. Oral macrolide antibiotics were shown

2019 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

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